WELCOME TO THE ILC-UK

The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. We develop ideas, undertake research and create a forum for debate.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partner organisations, to inform important decision-making processes. We are aided in this work by our Chief Executive, Baroness Sally Greengross, former director-general of Age Concern and now a cross-bench peer.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

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NEWS:

International Longevity Centre - UK make the case for political consensus required to tackle “perfect storm” for savers.

Social isolation, loneliness and giving up caregiving all linked to depression and low quality of life in old age.

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PUBLICATIONS

This report, supported by Prudential, calls upon the next Government to introduce a new independent Pensions Commission to rebuild consensus-based policy making in pensions and tackle the substantial challenge of insufficient incomes in retirement.

This report, the second in a two part series summarising research from the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London (UCL), focusses on the UCL findings on the subjective wellbeing of older carers.

This report is one of two in conjunction with the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London. This report emphasises the importance of social connections in later life and highlights the problem of low levels of life satisfaction among older people.

New research published today by the ILC-UK reveals a continuing generational divide in access to and trust of health information. The research finds that older people are more likely to use and trust doctors and nurses whilst younger people are more likely than older to look towards pharmacists and online and telephone services.

The Missing Million: Pathways back into employment – the second in our series – examines the paths that older people take as they seek re-employment, shedding light on these journeys and identifying the predominant obstacles and barriers that continue to keep labour force participation so low among people aged 50+ in the UK.

With demand for NHS services already under pressure, new analysis by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and supported by Engage Mutual, the over-50s life cover specialists, predicts the NHS may have to support up to one million more older people with serious illnesses within the next ten years.

BLOGS:

In my last post I argued that the key to avoiding inter-generational conflict over retirement is making it possible for people to decide for themselves how and when they exit the labour market. Only that way will we accept that we cannot sustain the work:retirement balance that we have come to expect during the last generation.

In my last post I described the looming ‘hard landing’ in which incompatible and unsustainable retirement expectations become a political and social battleground. The question is whether we can design, and transition to, a future retirement system that is sustainable, without causing a fracture between generations.

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EVENTS:

Monday 16th March 2015; 08:00 (for an 8:30 start) – 10:00;...