PUBLICATIONS:

In this analysis of the main party manifestos we highlight a failure to respond to demographic change and long term population ageing.

The Missing Million research, undertaken by ILC-UK with Business in the Community and PRIME, has identified more than a million people aged over 50 who are forced out of work involuntarily.

After decades of the number of deaths in the UK falling, 2015 will mark a “tipping point” where the historic trend starts to reverse: as the oldest of the babyboomer generation move through their later years deaths are predicted to rise by 20%.

This is the final report of the Commission on the Voluntary Sector & Ageing which was set up by NPC and the ILC-UK to put ageing on the agenda of the voluntary sector.

Today we have launched a major new report, sponsored by Aviva, providing the first detailed exploration of what certain choices made at the point of retirement today could mean for overall levels of retirement income over the next 30 years.

Age at death will increasingly cluster in the 90s and the life expectancy of men and women will converge, according to a study by academics from Cass Business School in partnership with the ILC UK.

This report, supported by Prudential, calls upon the next Government to introduce a new independent Pensions Commission to rebuild consensus-based policy making in pensions and tackle the substantial challenge of insufficient incomes in retirement.

This report, the second in a two part series summarising research from the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London (UCL), focusses on the UCL findings on the subjective wellbeing of older carers.

This report is one of two in conjunction with the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London. This report emphasises the importance of social connections in later life and highlights the problem of low levels of life satisfaction among older people.

New research published today by the ILC-UK reveals a continuing generational divide in access to and trust of health information. The research finds that older people are more likely to use and trust doctors and nurses whilst younger people are more likely than older to look towards pharmacists and online and telephone services.