NEWS:

We are currently looking to review and refresh the consultants we work with. As a small organisation which is continuing to grow in terms of work, reach and size, we often partner with consultants when we are low on capacity and/or require specific skills we do not possess in house.

To this end, we are looking to establish a small but diverse range of consultants who can contribute to our work in the following areas:

  • Health Economists - We are interested in working with individuals who have a particular expertise in health economics, i.e those who have expertise in studying the functioning of health markets, and with detailed experience of quantitatively evaluating health interventions.
     
  • Fiscal and Economic Policy – we are keen to work with economists who can provide robust economic analysis to help formulate our policy positions and build evidence to support them through leading on costings, public finances forecasting and interest/expertise in developing new models of analysis for ILC-UK.
     
  • Expert users of microdata - We are looking for individuals who are highly comfortable using big datasets such as ELSA, LCFS and WAS in order to derive robust insights about the behaviours of individuals over time.
     
  • Strong research and/or policy expertise in the following subjects linked to population ageing including but not exclusively - pensions and financial planning, poverty and life chances, health and social care, housing and design, the built environment, the older consumer, equalities and age discrimination.
     
  • Demography – we are interested in individuals who have expertise and research experience in analysing complex demographic surveys and demographic modelling, in particular a background in either demography, epidemiology, statistics. Consultants who have a track record of working on and preparing population survey datasets would be of interest.
     
  • Futurist, Trend Forecasting and Data Analytics – we are a futures based organisation and we are not simply about responding to population ageing today but rather anticipating and developing solutions for tomorrow. We are interested in experts who will help us to identify global, national and regional trends and disruptors across different sectors and markets.
     
  • Qualitative Research – we occasionally look to work with consultants on large qualitative aspects of research and would be particularly interested to hear from consultants with expertise in working with older and/or vulnerable groups.
     
  • Events and broader stakeholder engagement – alongside our research and policy analysis, we run a wide range of events, broader stakeholder engagement and influencing activity. We are particularly keen to hear from professionals who have a strong track record in delivering projects of this nature and organising high level events including fundraising events.

We would ask interested individuals to please send over their CV, with additional details of: availability/level of notice required for projects, estimated day or project rate and two references of past clients or previous employment.

If your skills and experience marry with our requirements then we would be keen to recognise you as an official ILC consultant on our webpage and of course, any involvement in projects would be attributed and acknowledged. Following on from this, we would look to hold an initial set up meeting to explore future potential projects.


For further details or to apply please email: Research and Strategy Director: Sallymariebamford@ilcuk.org.uk

Further details and background on ILC-UK:

We are the ILC-UK, the leading think tank on ageing and demographic change. As an independent non-partisan charitable think tank, we are futures based, exploring sustainable solutions to some of the prescient challenges facing us today.

Established by Baroness Greengross in 2001, we generate strategic thinking on some of the most challenging issues facing us as national and global citizens. We are part of 17 ILC Centres, which extends our reputation and reach across the world.

Our overarching mission is to make a difference – not just in terms of delivering better outcomes for older people – but critically helping to create a fair, just and sustainable society for all, creating current and future wellbeing across society and the generations.

We generate strategic thinking on some of the most challenging issues facing us as national and global citizens. We produce rigorous yet accessible evidenced based research and thought leadership. Presenting current and futures research on economic policy, families and community, health and social care, migration and integration, transport and planning, work and wellbeing.

Issue and impact driven –we aim to improve public policy and practice both at the national and international level. We are solutions focussed and all our reports include targeted recommendations for future action.

We believe to have true impact as a think tank you need to combine robust and rigorous research methods with strong policy knowledge and adept communication. We are unique in our skills set, with a core team of 14, composed of former academics, Chief Executives, economists, policy advisors and speech writers. We are also supported in a work by a broader team of Trustees, leading advisors, consultants and our Academic and Emerging Researchers Board.

Our primary audiences and stakeholders are national and international governments, politicians, policy makers, thought leaders and opinion formers, business and industry, the third sector and other think tanks and researchers in the academic and non-academic sectors.

We have limited core funding (which is currently derived by a Partners Programme primarily composted of private sector organisations, though some Universities), with income primarily being generated by project based research, policy analysis and events.

We work with a range of leading corporate clients, including the financial and insurance sector, housing and retirement providers for example but have of late diversified income streams to include Government departmental funding for example DH, third sector funding mainly from ageing related charities, ESRC funding and other academic, grants and trust funding through working with academic partners. Please visit our website to see examples of our work and past clients.

Responding to NHS England, Public Health England, the Department of Health and NHS Improvement’s announcement that employers of social care workers will no longer need to pay to have their employees vaccinated against the flu, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) has praised the long-called for decision.

Whilst NHS staff were already offered the vaccination for free to protect patients and the public, the Government recommended that social care workers were immunised but asked employers of social care workers to pay for the vaccine. The ILC-UK has long highlighted the need to fund the vaccine for social care workers, to protect the extremely vulnerable people under their care.

The flu epidemic in care homes in Wigan last winter, which lead to thirty cases of flu, eight deaths, and Wigan Infirmary and the North West Ambulance Service facing additional pressures, is a case study of the toll that low uptake of flu vaccination among care home staff can have on residents and the NHS.

However, the ILC-UK is also urging the Government to ensure that domiciliary care workers are also reimbursed for the immunisation, so that they can protect the people they care for from influenza this winter.

David Sinclair, Director of the International Longevity Centre – UK said:

‘Influenza is a serious illness which does kill.

For years the ILC-UK highlighted that it made little sense to offer NHS staff the vaccination for free, whilst asking employers of social care workers to pay for the jab, as their staff also care for the most vulnerable people in our society.

Protecting older people through offering the flu vaccine to social care workers free of charge is a common sense approach that will save lives this winter. However, we are urging the Government to go further and ensure that domiciliary care workers are reimbursed when they receive the vaccine on the high street so that they too can protect the people under their care’.

Contact

Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) or 020 7340 0440.

Notes

For more information about vaccination, visit http://www.adultimmunisation.eu.

About

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.
Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.
Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

www.ilcuk.org.uk

@ILCUK



Since our last update, we have participated in the bi-annual International Longevity Centre Global Alliance meeting, which brings together all 17 ILCs from around the world; we have also announced the agenda for the 2017 Future of Ageing Conference; hosted an international summit on adult immunisation in conjunction with the International Federation on Ageing, and held our annual Partners Lunch in the House of Lords.

Agenda for the 2017 Future of Ageing Conference announced

Featuring 8 workshops covering everything from innovation in the housing industry, ageism, antimicrobial resistance and extending working lives, to care, the labour market and the future of death and dying, the 2017 Future of Ageing Conference has something for everyone.

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today

The Conference will host more than 40 speakers and contributors, with the winners of our competition to present their vision for the future of ageing to be publicly announced next week. As well as a variety of interactive workshops in which all contributors will be challenged and asked to present solutions, plenary sessions will feature discussions on health, inequality, the NHS and the 100 year life.

Each workshop and debate will be a frank and open discussion on the biggest issues facing our rapidly ageing society. Between now and the Conference, ILC-UK staff will be giving their take on these issues in videos posted to our Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts. Below, Assistant Economist Dean Hochlaf addresses the question 'Given our rapidly ageing society, will we need more migrants or more older workers in the future?'.

Click here for the full Conference agenda.



Click to view ILC-UK Assistant Economist Dean Hochlaf discuss the Conference topic of the demands of the labour market in a rapidly ageing society.

Recent ILC-UK Publications


The Global Savings Gap

This new report, supported by Prudential Plc, examines 30 countries and regions and finds stark intergenerational savings gaps around the world.

The Value of Financial Advice

This new research report finds that those who received financial advice in the 2001-2007 period had accumulated significantly more liquid financial assets and pension wealth than their unadvised equivalent peers by 2012-14.

When the drugs won't work: Antimicrobial resistance and the future of medicine

This information report provides an introduction to antimicrobial resistance, and the role each of us can play to help prevent medicine being 'plunged back into the dark ages'.

Extending working lives: Overcoming inequalities conference report 2017

This report summarises the key points that emerged from the Overcoming Inequalities: Addressing barriers to extending working lives event, held in April at Church House in London.

Towards affordable healthcare: Why effective innovation is key

This major new report, supported by EY has found that whilst the UK is well placed to innovate to improve health outcomes and reduce costs, the UK is often not doing enough with the tools at its disposal.

Partner Events

Hymans Robertson's Third Annual Life Insurance Seminar
Tuesday, 10th October; 09:00 - 13:00; Stationers' Hall, Ave Maria Lane, London EC4M 7DD

Hymans Robertson are hosting their 3rd Annual Life Insurance Seminar in London on the 10 October from 9am-1pm, this year’s theme is growth opportunities in insurance. Please click the button below for more details, and to register for the event.

Register here

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our last update, ILC-UK staff have written about default financial guidance, housing and isolation in a rapidly ageing society, and the role of music in diagnosing, preventing and treating dementia.

'Default guidance needed to embolden consumer freedom' is the rallying cry of ILC-UK's Head of Economics of Ageing Ben Franklin, who this month wrote a special extended blog on the impact of pension freedoms and the implications of default financial guidance.

ILC-UK Research Fellow Sally Bowell has introduced the work of the Commission on Dementia and Music in 'Always on my mind: Understanding the role of music in dementia'. The blog explores the issues being addressed by the Commission, chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross, coordinated by the ILC-UK and supported by the Utley Foundation.

Finally, 'Social Crises: Housing, Isolation and an Ageing Population' examines different models of intergenerational living, such as the Homeshare and Mehrgenerationenhausen systems. This blog was produced by Eloise Peck, an ILC-UK summer economics intern

If you would like to contribute an article to our guest blog, please contact Dave Eaton at davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Edinburgh Napier University, EY, FirstPort, Housing&Care 21, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

Working with ILC-UK

Research and Events

Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

Press

If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

About ILC-UK

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focused on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.
We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.
Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

We are an intergenerational and solutions focused in our approach, our work is evidence based and all our reports include targeted recommendations for future action.
Over the last year, we have enjoyed great success both in terms of our impact and reach:

• Producing over 35 reports.
• Holding over 50 high level events and conferences.
• Featuring in every UK national newspaper, in international publications, contributing to national TV and radio debates, and reaching an international Twitter audience of more than 5 million.

The ILC-UK is part of the ILC Global Alliance. The alliance is a multinational research and educational consortium, united in a common purpose to understand and address the consequences of population ageing and advancing longevity.

Candidate Specification

You will work closely with the Director of Research and Strategy, our Economists and Research Fellows, joining a growing team of researchers working on major themes in public policy. You will lead and contribute to policy research and advisory projects, sometimes cross-country, engage with policy-makers in research and advisory processes and disseminate results.
We need a Senior Research Fellow with excellent analytical and written skills, a track record of project management and delivery, with a strong passion and understanding for UK public policy. You must be able to work at a rapid pace, conducting secondary analysis of literature and evidence including data. Alongside this, you will be need to be able develop your own narrative including drawing together interesting and salient conclusions and recommendations to influence UK public policy. You must be able to work on multiple projects at the same time with competing deadlines. Candidates should also have experience in client liaison, proposal development and wider fundraising activities and management as well as supervision of junior researchers.
This role would suit an individual with over three years’ experience in a public policy or research environment. You will need strong analytical ability, including high level competency in interpreting and communicating complex data analysis. A broad understanding of, and interest in, current economic and social policy debates is a must.

Key Responsibilities

Research and funding Developing and leading policy relevant research, including the production of outputs (e.g. research reports, journal articles, policy briefings and blogs). This includes attracting funds through the identification of funding opportunities, development of bids, and pro-active promotion of ILC-UK’s work.

Project management 
Taking responsibility for the implementation and overall management of research, advisory and public affairs projects, including supervision and management of junior researchers.

Policy advice, public affairs, and dissemination Maximising the potential influence of our research and expertise through the dissemination of research, engagement with key stakeholders and other activities, such a media engagement.

Contributing to ILC-UK’s broader community life Contributing to ILC-UK internal and external meetings and events, and more broadly the intellectual and social capital of the organisation.

Key Skills

Essential

  • Over three years’ experience in a public policy or research environment.
  • Ability to interpret and use complex data to develop a strong narrative and produce impactful policy solutions.
  • A track record of drafting and publishing reports or articles at speed.
  • Strong track record in project management and delivery including supervision of junior members of staff.
  • Experience of fundraising through leading on, or contributing to, tenders or project proposals from ideally a range of funders, including Government, academic trusts, foundations and charities.
  • Understanding and experience of analysing key UK health, social or economic public policy.
  • Ability to write engaging articles, briefs and reports for different audiences.
  • Ability to work independently in a highly-pressured environment and to tight deadlines.
  • Ability to work independently but offer support and guidance to more junior members of the team.
  • Ability to work under pressure, managing multiple tasks with competing deadlines.
  • Good IT skills.

Desirable

  • A Masters or higher degree in Social Sciences with research methods component including quantitative analysis.
  • Experience of producing funding proposals/undertaking fundraising.
  • Experience of undertaking media interviews.
  • Experience or interest in the dissemination of research and the presentation of results in an academic, public or policy setting.
  • Demonstrable interest or experience of working on ageing related issues and a knowledge or interest of public policy environment in this field including policy development and the political process.

Post Information

The ILC-UK envisages this post to be a full-time position but is happy to consider part-time arrangements, secondments or permanent placements for the right candidate.

Duration

The post is initially offered on a year contract, with the strong possibility of extension and increase for the right candidate, who will then develop their own programme of work.

Location

Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Hours

5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible for the right candidate)

Salary

£35,000-£40,000 (depending on experience)

Start Date ASAP

How to Apply
Send a (maximum) two-page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Director of Research and Strategy at recruitment@ilcuk.org.uk, ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.
If selected for interview you will be asked to produce a short sample of your written work.

Application Deadline 20th October 2017

Interview Date 6th November 2017

Documents:

JD ILC-UK Senior Research Fellow ()

Get the free PDF reader

About ILC-UK

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focused on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

We are intergenerational and solutions focused in our approach, our work is evidence based and all our reports include targeted recommendations for future action.

Over the last year, we have enjoyed great success both in terms of our impact and reach:

  • Producing over 35 reports.
  • Holding over 50 high level events and conferences.
  • Featuring in every UK national newspaper, in international publications, contributing to national TV and radio debates, and reaching an international Twitter audience of more than 5 million.

The ILC-UK is part of the ILC Global Alliance. The alliance is a multinational research and educational consortium, united in a common purpose to understand and address the consequences of population ageing and advancing longevity.

Candidate Specification

Political interest in our areas of concern have never been higher.  We work on some of the most pressing current policy issues including how social care could be funded, how young people will be able to have a reasonable retirement income, how communities could work for all ages, and how we can afford health in the context of demographic change. This role will need to help ensure ILC-UK maximises visibility in this time of opportunity.

We need a Political Advisor with excellent analytical and written skills, a track record of political project management and delivery, with a strong passion and understanding for UK public policy.  The post holder should be able to interpret and understand research to disseminate to a wider audience. You must be able to work at a rapid pace, with both the Research and Public Affairs teams. You must also be able to work on multiple projects at the same time with competing deadlines. Ideally candidates should have experience in client liaison and project development, though this is not essential.

This role would suit an individual with experience in political engagement who also has experience in responding to governmental consultations and who can develop ILCs networks and alliances, enhancing the visibility of our research.

Key Responsibilities

Enhancing our political reputation: Developing and leading our political engagement strategy to ensure we have strong links with key opinion formers to promote the work of the ILC-UK.

Enhancing the visibility of our research: Maximising the potential influence of our research and expertise through the dissemination of research, engagement with key stakeholders and other activities, such as media engagement.

Delivering political projects and contributing political input to research projects: Taking responsibility for the implementation and overall management of political, advisory and public affairs projects.  Supporting the Research team to disseminate through political engagement.

Contributing to ILC-UK’s broader community life: Contributing to ILC-UK internal and external meetings and events, and more broadly the intellectual and social capital of the organisation.

Key Skills

Essential

  • Experience of working with and in Westminster and/or Whitehall.
  • Strong knowledge of Parliamentary procedure and the workings of Whitehall.
  • Good project management experience.
  • Understanding of the external political environment and political developments as they may affect ILC-UK.
  • Ability to understand and interpret research and disseminate it to a wide variety of audiences.
  • Track record of influencing stakeholders and understanding the opportunities and risks of working collaboratively with other stakeholders.
  • Ability to write engaging articles, briefs and reports for different audiences.
  • Experience of working on policy and political events.
  • Ability to work independently in a highly-pressured environment and to tight deadlines.
  • Ability to offer support and guidance to more junior members of the team.
  • Ability to work under pressure, managing multiple tasks with competing deadlines.
  • Good IT skills and knowledge of using social media for political purposes.

Desirable

  • Experience of responding to governmental and other consultations.
  • Experience of producing funding proposals/undertaking fundraising.
  • Experience of undertaking media interviews.
  • Experience of working with non-governmental organisations and/ or international agencies.
  • Demonstrable interest or experience of working on ageing related issues and a knowledge or interest of public policy environment in this field including policy development and the political process.

Post Information

The ILC-UK envisages this post to be a full-time position but is happy to consider part-time arrangements, secondments or permanent placements for the right candidate.

Duration

The post is initially offered on a year contract, with the strong possibility of extension and increase for the right candidate, who will then develop their own programmes of work.

Location

Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Hours

5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible for the right candidate).

Salary

£25,000-£35,000 (depending on experience).

Start Date

ASAP.

How to Apply

Send a (maximum) two-page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK at info@ilcuk.org.uk, ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.
If selected for interview you will be asked to produce a short sample of your written work.

Application Deadline

03/10/17

Interview Date

17/10/17

Documents:

ILC-UK Political Advisor ()

Get the free PDF reader


Press Release

Think tank urges Government to ensure that more social care workers are protected against the flu

Responding to Simon Stevens’ call that NHS Trusts make an additional 3000 beds available to respond to what is expected to be a particularly pressurised winter flu season, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), is calling on the Government to work to ensure that more social care staff receive the winter flu jab.

Whilst the Government recommends that all adult social care workers receive the flu jab, they are not eligible to receive the vaccination on the NHS.

The flu epidemic in care homes in Wigan last winter, which lead to thirty cases of flu, eight deaths, and Wigan Infirmary and the North West Ambulance Service facing additional pressures, is a case study of the toll that low uptake of flu vaccination among care home staff can have on residents and the NHS.

David Sinclair, Director of the International Longevity Centre – UK said:

‘With Simon Stevens’ call for the NHS to ready itself for a particularly bad winter flu season, it is imperative that adult social care workers are immunised to prevent the vulnerable people they care for contracting influenza and becoming hospitalised.

Influenza is a serious illness which does kill.

We would urge all eligible older people to sign up for their free jab via their GP or pharmacy. For those not eligible for the free jab but who want to protect themselves against the flu, the vaccine is now widely available in pharmacies and supermarkets.

Contact

Contact Dave Eaton at davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk for more information.

Notes

For more information about vaccination, visit http://www.adultimmunisation.eu.

About

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

@ILCUK

This year's Future of Ageing Conference will play host to 10 different panel debates covering everything from automating care, ageism, innovation in housing and the end of life.

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today

Confirmed workshops and confirmed speakers include:

Opening Keynote: Dr Pol Vandenbroucke, Vice President Medical Strategy, Pfizer

How can we maximise the economic contribution of older people?

  • Diane Kenwood, Editor, Woman's Weekly and ILC-UK Trustee
  • John McTernan, Senior Vice President, PSB and Former Political Secretary to Prime Minister Tony Blair
  • Jane Ashcroft CBE, Chief Executive, Anchor
  • Professor Debora Price, President, British Society of Gerontology and Director, MICRA
  • Professor Andrew Scott, Professor of Economics, London Business School

Is the Future less or more ageist?

  • Sam Smethers, Chief Executive, Fawcett Society
  • Rt Hon Dame Margaret Hodge MP, Member of Parliament for Barking, discussing 'How to stop wasting women's talents: overcoming our fixation with youth'
  • Yasmin Boudiaf, Virtual Reality Expert, discussing 'Can we use Virtual Reality to tackle ageism?'
  • Tessa Harding, Ex-NCVO and Help the Aged

Can technology drive innovation in pensions, health and care?

  • Alison Martin, Global Head of Life and Health, Swiss Re
  • Other speakers to be confirmed

Is antimicrobial resistance a threat to longevity - and what can we do about it? 

  • Mark Chataway, Managing Director, Hyderus
  • Professor Anthony Scott, Director, The Vaccine Centre, LSHTM
  • Professor Alan Johnson, Head of AMR, Public Health England's Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control

How can we save the NHS?

  • Rt Hon Stephen Dorrell, Chair, NHS Confederation and former Health Secretary
  • Dr David Oliver, Clinical Vice President, Royal College of Physicians
  • Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Pamela Spence, Partner, Global Life Sciences Industry Leader, EY

More inequalities in a world of austerity? 

  • Anna Dixon, Chief Executive, Centre for Ageing Better
  • Inequalities in Life Expectancy: Andrew Gaches, Head of Longevity, Life and Financial Services, Hymans Robertson
  • Inequalities in Old Age: Professor Thomas Scharf, Professor of Social Gerontology, Newcastle University
  • Austerity and Health Across Europe: Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing, International Longevity Centre - UK

Filling the skills gap: Migration, more older workers, or both?

  • Yvonne Sonsino, Partner and Innovation Leader, Mercer and Co-Chair DWP Fuller Working Lives Business Strategy Group
  • Professor Jonathan Portes, Professor of Economics and Public Policy, King's College London
  • Dean Hochlaf, Assistant Economist, International Longevity Centre - UK

Can we automate care?

  • George Holley-Moore, Research and Policy Manager, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Eric Kihlstrom, Co-Founder, KareInn
  • Pamela Spence, Partner, Global Life Sciences Industry Leader, EY

How can the housing industry innovate for tomorrow's older consumers?

  • Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Nigel Howell, Chief Executive, FirstPort
  • Gary Day, Land and Planning Director, McCarthy and Stone
  • Lord Best, Co-Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group on Housing and Care for Older People

The future of the end: Living forever or dying in style?

  • Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Professor Douglas Davies FBA, Professor of the Study of Religion, Durham University, and Director of the Centre for Death and Life Studies
  • Louise Winter, Founder, Poetic Endings
  • Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Manager, International Longevity Centre - UK

Closing Keynote: Professor Andrew Scott, Professor of Economics, London Business School and author of 'The 100 year life'.

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today

There will also be a number of keynote presentations, and an open slot to allow one delegate to present their idea to help society prepare for the future of ageing.

Join us at #FutureofAgeing
For more information click here: http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

Future of Ageing 2017: Sponsored by:

Supported by:

During this year’s Future of Ageing conference, we would like to invite you to share your vision of the Future of Ageing with an exclusive speaking slot.

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today                                               

The Future of Ageing 2017: Transforming Tomorrow Today
Wednesday, 29th November 2017 - 9:00 - 18:00 (approx.)
Amnesty International Human Rights Action Centre
25 New Inn Yard, London, EC2A 3EA


We are looking for someone to speak (or sing or dance or perform in any way you think appropriate) for 10 minutes on the plenary platform in front of 200+ opinion formers and decision makers.

We want someone who will present a vision and set out what needs to be done to make it a reality. Your vision could be as narrow or as broad as you want.

If you would like to take us up on this opportunity, send us an email (events@ilcuk.org.uk) with under 150 words summarising what you would like to say. Deadline for entrants is 12:00 Tuesday, 12th September.

Early bird rates end Thursday 31st August.
For more information about the Future of Ageing Conference, visit
www.futureofageing.org.uk.

Only two weeks left to take advantage of our early bird rates for the 2017 Future of Ageing Conference.
 

                                                              Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today


The Future of Ageing Conference 2017
Wednesday, 29th November
Amnesty International Human Rights Action Centre
25 New Inn Yard, London, EC2A 3EA


Thursday, 31st August is the final day our special early bird rates will be available for the 2017 Future of Ageing Conference.

Early bird rates offer significant discounts:

  • Early bird Corporate rate £235 as opposed to £299
  • Charity/Not-for-profit/Academic/Individual rate £155 as opposed to £210
    (All prices ex. VAT)                                                         

Join us at #FutureofAgeing

For more information visit: http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

Sponsorship opportunities

We have a range of sponsorship, advertising and promotional opportunities to suit all objectives and budgets. Our team are dedicated to understanding your aims and will help to put together a bespoke package to suit your needs.
Please contact Fabiana Bertin 0207 340 0440 or events@ilcuk.org.uk for more information.

Future of Ageing 2017: Sponsored by

 

Supported by
 

The ILC-UK has launched a Commission on Dementia and Music, designed to explore the current and potential role of music-based interventions in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, care and end of life care for people with dementia. According to the Alzheimer’s Society, there are 850,000 people with dementia in the UK, with numbers set to rise to over one million by 2025. By 2051, it is estimated that this will have reached two million people. Currently in the UK, one in six people over the age of 80 have dementia, with 40,000 people under the age of 65 living with the disease. As such, an increased and sustained public and policy focus on dementia is crucial.

This is an independent Commission, with the ILC-UK providing the governance and secretariat while the Commissioners, drawn from a wide range of different sectors, will drive the agenda and findings. This work is kindly being supported by the Utley Foundation.

As part of this high level Commission, we are seeking written evidence from a range of experts, framed by two overarching questions. Please find below a written evidence template, which provides further information about the Commission, the call for evidence and the questions which we would like to put to respondents. Please note that not all questions may be relevant for all respondents and we would therefore be happy to receive partial submissions.

The written submissions will form a key part of the evidence base for a final report due to be published in December of this year. The final report is intended for a policy and public audience, so written submissions should be accessible but at the same time, informative, thought provoking, ideally challenging while offering solutions/recommendations.

Please send any written evidence (strictly using the template provided) to our email address set up for this purpose: dementia@ilcuk.org.uk, and please note that the deadline for submissions is 5pm Friday 1 September.

Authors are requested to provide a very short biography of themselves/their organisations of no more than four lines to sit alongside their submission. Due to time constraints, we will only be making minor amendments/proofing so all submissions need to be of a publishable standard. ILC-UK reserves the right not to publish material for any reason. All authors and their organisation will be credited in the final report and any associated publicity and promotional material linked to the response.

 

Documents:

Commission on Dementia and Music - Template ()

Get the free PDF reader

In response to the Office for Budget Responsibility's first Fiscal Risk report, which found that ageing and technology cost pressures make health spending the biggest risk to fiscal sustainability, Sally-Marie Bamford, Director of Strategy and Research at the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK), the UK's leading think tank focusing on longevity, ageing and population change said:

“Today’s OBR Fiscal Risks report shows that the ageing of our population is the greatest single risk to government spending by driving up health costs over the long run. As our recent SOS2020 report showed, we will need transformative change in the health sector in order to ensure long run sustainability, which in particular will mean getting smarter with innovation.

Within the NHS, too many funding mechanisms still do not reward or encourage innovation, with payments too often based on output and not outcome, and Clinical Commissioning Group funding regulations discouraging the bold moves needed to create long-term cost savings, whilst still maintaining high levels of quality.

As one of the largest components of age-related public spending, healthcare is at the forefront of the challenge of ageing and delivering long run productivity growth in healthcare is likely to be one, if not the, most important element in ensuring a sustainable older society.”

In the SOS2020 report we modelled future health spending scenarios and found:

Health spending as a proportion of GDP

  • In the “transformative change” scenario, health spending rises from around 6% of GDP in 2019-20 to 8% by 2064-65.
  • In the “gradual convergence” scenario, health spending rises from around 6% of GDP in 2019-20 to 11.4% by 2064-65.
  • In the “no policy change scenario”, health spending rises from around 6% of GDP in 2019-20 to 16.4% by 2064-65.


The primary balance – the difference between non interest receipts and expenditure

  • In the “transformative change scenario”, the primary balance falls from a surplus of around 2% of GDP to a deficit of 1.9%.
  • In the “gradual convergence scenario”, the primary balance falls from a surplus of around 2% of GDP to a deficit of 5.3%.
  • In the “no policy change scenario”, the primary balance falls from a surplus of around 2% of GDP to a deficit of 10.3%.


Download the report, 'Towards affordable healthcare: Why effective innovation is key' at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/towards_affordable_healthcare_why_effective_innovation_is_key

Contact

Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or 020 7340 0440.

Notes

The Office for Budget Responsibility's first Fiscal Risk report can be downloaded from http://budgetresponsibility.org.uk/frr/fiscal-risk-report-july-2017/

About SOS2020

SOS 2020 was established by ILC-UK with the aim to raise awareness of the need to adapt our economy and society to the big strategic challenges posed by an ageing population, and will outline the specific policy measures needed to achieve this goal. It will illuminate the issues that face us and develop fully considered and costed solutions that will act as a “call to action” to policy-makers and politicians.

This second report in the SOS health series draws on the learning and some of the innovations from the last report. We explore the potential for innovation application and diffusion in health care within the UK and critically how the ‘right type’ of innovation could make health care better and cheaper, essentially doing ‘more with less’.

About

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK)
is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and supported by Royal London finds that those who received financial advice in the 2001-2007 period had accumulated significantly more liquid financial assets and pension wealth than their unadvised equivalent peers by 2012-14.

The report, ‘The Value of Financial Advice’ analyses data from the largest representative survey of individual and household assets in Great Britain, the Wealth and Assets Survey. Even allowing for the fact that some groups are more likely to seek advice than others, the research still shows that those who receive advice do better than an equivalent group who don’t.

The report examines the impact of financial advice on two groups, the ‘affluent’ and the ‘just getting by’. The ‘affluent’ group is formed of a wealthier subset of people who are also more likely to have degrees, be part of a couple, and be homeowners. The ‘just getting by’ group is formed of a less wealthy subset who are more likely to have lower levels of educational attainment, be single, divorced or widowed and be renting.

The Value of Financial Advice’ finds that:

  • The ‘affluent but advised’ accumulated on average £12,363 (or 17%) more in liquid financial assets than the affluent and non-advised group, and £30,882 (or 16%) more in pension wealth (total £43,245)
  • The ‘just getting by but advised’ accumulated on average £14,036 (or 39%) more in liquid financial assets than the just getting by but non-advised group, and £25,859 (or 21%) more in pension wealth (total £39,895)

The report also finds that financial advice led to greater levels of saving and investment in the equity market:

  • The ‘affluent but advised’ group were 6.7% more likely to save and 9.7% more likely to invest in the equity market than the equivalent non-advised group
  • The ‘just getting by but advised’ group were 9.7% more likely to save and 10.8% more likely to invest in the equity market than the equivalent non-advised group

Those who had received advice in the 2001-2007 period also had more pension income than their peers by 2012-14:

  • The ‘affluent but advised’ group earn £880 (or 16%) more per year than the equivalent non-advised group
  • The ‘just getting by but advised’ group earn £713 (or 19%) more per year than the equivalent non-advised group

The report found that 9 in 10 people are satisfied with the advice received, with the clear majority deciding to go with their adviser’s recommendation.

Despite the advantages of receiving advice, only 16.8% of people saw an adviser in the years 2012-2014. Indeed, ‘The Value of Financial Advice’ finds that even amongst those who took out an investment product in the last few years, around 40% didn’t take advice, rising to 78% of people who took out a personal pension.

After controlling for a range of factors, ‘The Value of Financial Advice’ concludes that the two most powerful driving forces of whether people sought advice was whether the individual trusts an Independent Financial Adviser to provide advice, and the individual’s level of financial capability. Therefore, the report makes a series of recommendations to raise demand for financial advice including:

  • Using advice to support the auto-enrolled – duty on employers to ensure staff can access the best information and advice on their pensions
  • Mandating default guidance for those seeking to access their pension savings – to ensure people can get crucial information in a complex marketplace and avoid worst outcomes
  • Helping to create informed consumers through continued development and roll out the pensions dashboard
  • Ensuring regulators continue to place emphasis on access to independent financial advice


Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing, ILC-UK said:

“Our results show that those who take advice are likely to accumulate more financial and pension wealth, supported by increased saving and investing in equity assets, while those in retirement are likely to have more income, particularly at older ages.

But the advice market is not working for everyone. A high proportion of people who take out investments and pensions do not use financial advice, while only a minority of the population has seen a financial adviser. Since advice has clear benefits for customers, it is a shame that more people do not use it. The clear challenge facing the industry, regulator and government is therefore to get more people through the “front door” in the first place.”

Steve Webb, Director of Policy, Royal London said:

“This powerful research shows for the first time the very real return to obtaining expert financial advice. What is most striking is that the proportionate impact is largest for those on more modest incomes. Financial advice need not be the preserve of the better off but can make a real difference to the quality of life in retirement of people on lower incomes as well. The evidence shows that when people take advice they are overwhelmingly satisfied and benefit as a result. More needs therefore to be done to overcome the barriers to advice.”

A copy of the Value of Advice is available to download from http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/the_value_of_financial_advice

'In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes'
Benjamin Franklin

As a futures organisation focused on the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change, we work across the lifecourse, including its beginning, and end.

That's why the 2017 Future of Ageing Conference will host a debate on
'The Future of End'.

The Future of Ageing Conference 2017
Wednesday, 29th November
Amnesty International Human Rights Action Centre
25 New Inn Yard, London, EC2A 3EA

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Will we live forever, or die in style? Will the dead keep tweeting, and can we continue to take selfies with the deceased? Are funerals as we know them outdated, or are the hearse and black suit here to stay?

The debate, chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) will feature:

Professor Douglas Davies (Director, Centre for Death and Life Studies)

Prof. Davies is Professor in Durham University's Department of Theology and Religious Studies, and one of the UK's foremost experts on death, dying and ritual.



Click the image to watch Douglas Davies discuss innovations in British death rituals

Louise Winter (Founder, Poetic Endings)

A professional funeral celebrant and Founder of Poetic Endings, an alternative funeral directors based in London, Louise believes that 'A funeral doesn't have to be like the ones you've been to in the past'.
Read more about Poetic Endings and Louise's innovative approach to funerals in her June 2017 interview with The Guardian.


Dave Eaton (Policy and Public Affairs Manager, ILC-UK)

Dave holds an MA (Res) in Digital Thanatology for his thesis on Death and Social Media. He will be discussing the changing ways in which we might remember the deceased in the future. Find out whether virtual reality means that those who have passed away can continue to live online, and whether the deceased will keep on tweeting.

Louise Winter will also kindly be running a Death Café during lunch.
Click here to find out more about Death Cafés.

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Join us at #FutureofAgeing

For more information, and to reserve your place, visit: http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

Future of Ageing 2017: Sponsored by

‘When the drugs won’t work: Antimicrobial resistance and the future of medicine’, produced with funding from Pfizer, outlines what Governments, medical professionals and individuals can do to prevent the rise of antimicrobial resistance, including:

  • Individuals can reduce the risk of infection occurring through washing hands with soap and water for the length of one verse of God Save the Queen, or two renditions of Happy Birthday
  • Governments incentivising the creation of new vaccines to reduce the use of antibiotics

Immunisation prevents an estimated 2-3 million deaths every year in all age groups. Vaccines have greatly reduced, or eliminated many infectious diseases that once routinely killed or harmed many people, and increased vaccine rates can reduce the usage of antibiotics through reducing the risk of secondary infection.

Given that AMR could negate longevity improvements made since the mid-20th century, the ILC-UK has produced this accessible guide to what AMR is, why it matters, and what can be done to prevent what Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies has described as a ‘catastrophic threat’ to the UK, and the world.




Adapted from I. Holanec, ‘What you need to know about antibiotic resistance’, p12, IFoA Longevity Bulletin Issue 08, May 2016

As well as summarising existing literature, the report also draws on presentations delivered at an ILC-UK debate on tackling AMR in an ageing society held in November 2016. During the debate, an audience of public health experts heard from:

  • Professor David Salisbury CB, Associate Fellow, Centre on Global Health Security Chatham House
  • Matthew Edwards, Head of Mortality and Longevity, Towers Watson
  • Michelle Bresnahan, Founder, A Life for a Cure
  • Dr Gina Radford, Deputy Chief Medical Officer

The report’s section on what every individual can do to help prevent the rise of AMR quotes Dr Gina Radford, Deputy Chief Medical Officer, who said at the event:

‘Some of the prevention [techniques] are really simple things like hand-washing. On a day to day basis, you should wash your hands with soap and water for the length of one verse of God Save the Queen or two times through Happy Birthday.
And I can absolutely guarantee that most of us don’t do that. I know because I have observed – and I have observed myself. We don’t do some of this stuff and we are not practising just some of the most basic hygiene’.

Report author Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Manager, ILC-UK said:

‘We know that the rise of antimicrobial resistance could lead to up to 10 million deaths a year worldwide by 2050. However, it’s not just Governments and medical professionals who have a role to play in preventing the spread of AMR.

Each and every one of us can help reduce the risk of infection through good hygiene, like proper handwashing technique; through completing all courses of antibiotics and not requesting them for things like colds or sore throats; and through checking to see which vaccines we are eligible for, and keeping an up-to date vaccination record’.

Contact

Dave Eaton at ILC-UK davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk or 02073400440.

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

Notes to Editors

The report incorporates presentations delivered at the ILC-UK’s ‘The Dr Jack Watters debate: Tackling antimicrobial resistance in an ageing society’, held in Central London on Wednesday, 16th November 2016.

This report was made possible through an educational grant from Pfizer. The report was independently produced by the ILC-UK.

New report from independent think tank finds just seven health innovations could save the NHS £18.5 billion, and the social care sector £6.3 billion between 2015 – 2030.

However, the UK is not doing enough with the tools at its disposal, and a failure to innovate will see rising healthcare spending lead to a deficit worse than that caused by the Financial Crisis

A major new report from the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), supported by EY has found that whilst the UK is well placed to innovate to improve health outcomes and reduce costs, the UK is often not doing enough with the tools at its disposal.

With the NHS committed to achieving efficiency savings of £22 billion through productivity gains of 2-3% between 2015 - 2020, ‘Towards affordable healthcare: Why effective innovation is key’ explores how health care innovations currently employed at home and abroad could increase productivity and reduce costs.

The report showcases seven outstanding global and UK-based innovations with a strong evidence base of demonstrable success, and calculates the savings that could be achieved by implementing them across the UK. Home grown innovations include:

• The UK’s Memory First Project, an integrated dementia service run by a consortium of GPs across Staffordshire. Savings if working methods applied nationally: up to £38 million between 2019 – 2030.

• Manchester Royal Infirmary’s programme of providing the training and equipment to perform home dialysis. Savings if programmed applied nationally: up to £5.6 billion between 2014 – 2030.

The report concludes however that the UK is often not doing enough with the tools at its disposal to implement such innovations. Social care is underfunded and fragmented, which has consequences also for NHS costs, and funding mechanisms within the health system can often discourage innovation; there continues to be a slow uptake in the UK of new drugs and treatments, with adoption speed varying across the country.

The report presents three simple scenarios for future UK health care costs based on projections for demographic change, the rate of productivity growth in the economy, and the degree to which innovations are implemented, thus reducing residual costs, i.e. the impact of investment in technology, relative prices and different policies and institutional adaptations within the health service.

1. Transformative change: The health service makes significant productivity gains and ensures that residual health care costs are zero over the projected period.

2. Gradual convergence: In light of continuing cost pressures, it is perhaps hard to imagine public policymakers and individual NHS Trusts will not make adjustments over time to improve efficiency, but the transformation will take time and is unlikely to happen overnight. For this reason, productivity gradually improves over time so that residual health costs converge to zero by the end of the projected period (from 1.7% in 2019-20 to 0% by 2064-65).

3. No policy change: There is no meaningful policy change, productivity in the health service continues to disappoint and residual health costs rise in line with the historic OECD average (1.7%)


Health spending as a proportion of GDP

• In the transformative change scenario, health spending rises from around 6% of GDP in 2019-20 to 8% by 2064-65.
• In the gradual convergence scenario, health spending rises from around 6% of GDP in 2019-20 to 11.4% by 2064-65.
• In the no policy change scenario, health spending rises from around 6% of GDP in 2019-20 to 16.4% by 2064-65.

The primary balance – the difference between non interest receipts and expenditure

• In the transformative change scenario, the primary balance falls from a surplus of around 2% of GDP to a deficit of 1.9%.
• In the gradual convergence scenario, the primary balance falls from a surplus of around 2% of GDP to a deficit of 5.3%.
• In the no policy change scenario, the primary balance falls from a surplus of around 2% of GDP to a deficit of 10.3%.

Sally-Marie Bamford, Research and Strategy Director, ILC-UK said:

‘Whilst the UK has a strong history of innovation in the field of healthcare, the UK is at a crossroads. We have world-leading higher education and research institutions, and some of the most cutting-edge health tech start-ups are emerging from the UK. However, social care has for too long played second fiddle to the NHS, and a financially unsustainable model of adult social care has a knock-on effect in terms of NHS sustainability.

Within the NHS, too many funding mechanisms still do not reward or encourage innovation, with payments too often based on output and not outcome, and Clinical Commissioning Group funding regulations discouraging the bold moves needed to create long-term cost savings, whilst still maintaining high levels of quality.

As one of the largest components of age-related public spending, healthcare is at the forefront of the challenge of ageing. ‘Towards affordable healthcare: Why effective innovation is key’ demonstrates why supporting long run productivity growth in healthcare is likely to be one, if not the, most important element in ensuring a sustainable older society’.

Shaun Crawford, Global Insurance Leader, EY:

‘In undertaking this research, it became very apparent that the UK has a wealth of entrepreneurial expertise in digital innovation that encompasses ‘HealthTech’ and ‘InsurTech’.

It would seem highly desirable for the UK Government to fully leverage and indeed promote existing UK innovation to solve both many of the NHS’s challenges and showcase UK expertise in a post-Brexit international market.

It was particularly rewarding to see the tangible benefits already generated by the NHS’s own adoption of some of this innovation in our health and social care issues. We can clearly see the advantages that could be leveraged by other global economies facing even more significant health and ageing challenges than the UK’.


The Future of Ageing 2017: Transforming Tomorrow Today

Wednesday, 29th November 2017 - 9:00 - 18:00 (approx.)

Amnesty International Human Rights Action Centre
25 New Inn Yard, London, EC2A 3EA


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Time for Transformation, a new ‘normal’ – 
where society has aligned and adapted to the fact we are living longer.

The world is going through turbulent times. But one thing is certain – it is getting older.

ILC-UK has been active for 16 years and have witnessed some significant change over this time. Yet progress has been far too slow and we are still talking about issues which should have been solved 10 years ago.

This conference will aim to reinvigorate those of us already convinced of the importance of ageing. But to achieve the transformation we need must reach beyond the usual suspects. We need businesses, entrepreneurs, people managers, and marketing professionals to work with the charity sector and policy makers and politicians to deliver change. And we need to help provide the evidence to make the case for action.

Our third conference will seek to kick-start that transformation. It won’t be a run of the mill “ageing” conference. It will be different. We will challenge and energise you. We want the conference to lead to change.
If we are to make the most of the opportunity of age we need to engage businesses and community leaders to act.

We want everyone to come away learning something new and with a plan to act. We will set the groundwork to inspire and support government, business and voluntary organisations to better prepare, adapt and prosper in a longer-lived society. The conference will reach new businesses and other stakeholders.

You will disagree with some of what our presenters have to say. That’s fine, the Future of Ageing Conference is a place to have these honest debates. And you will get the opportunity to have your say.

The Future of Ageing Conference will

  • be brave enough to have the honest conversations we need to have
  • convene experts and innovators
  • challenge our own prejudices and yours
  • debate some of the big issues
  • avoid stereotyping. We won’t let people generalise about older or younger people or even about cohorts. Saying “The baby boomers X” will be banned.
  • debating the evidence rather than present it
  • avoid “the ageing Cliché”
  • try and cause mischief and have some fun
  • invite unexpected contributors to talk about the big and familiar issues
  • challenge every speaker
  • Insist speakers focus on the transforming tomorrow today

But we won’t...

  • repeat what people already know. Before the conference delegates will get a short factpack setting out the evidence
  • allow presenters to show us showing population pyramids (we all know we are ageing)
  • pretend that ageing is always good and that old age is always the best time of our lives. Too many older people spend too much of their time alone, in poor health, with only the TV for company
  • let people say “The fact we are living longer is a good thing”. It doesn’t need to be said. And it undermines the fact that for too many people today, old age isn’t a good or happy time
  • try to sex up ageing or pretend there are simple solutions
  • let anyone use imagery of older people’s hands in their presentation. And we won’t have any smiling studio shots of older people on the beach.


SPEAKERS AND DEBATES

9.25 Welcome to the Future of Ageing: Baroness Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK

9.30 Opening keynote: Dr Pol Vandenbroucke, Vice President Medical Strategy, Pfizer

10.00 ILC-UK keynote

10.10 Workshops

How can we maximise the Economic Contribution of older people?

  • John McTernan, Senior Vice President, PSB & Former Political Secretary to Tony Blair
  • Diane Kenwood, Editor, Woman’s Weekly & ILC-UK Trustee
  • Jane Ashcroft, Chief Executive, Anchor
  • Debora Price, Micra and BSG President
  • Professor Andrew Scott, Professor of Economics, London Business School

Is Anti-microbial resistance a threat to longevity – and what can we do about it?

  • Professor Alan Johnson, Head of AMR, Public Health England’s Centre for Infectious Disease Survelliance and Control
  • Professor Anthony Scott, Director, The Vaccine Centre, LSHTM
  • Mark Chataway, Managing Director, Hyderus
  • Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Manager, ILC-UK

Is the future less of more ageist?

  • Sam Smethers, Chief Executive, Fawcett Society
  • Rt Hon Dame Margaret Hodge MP, ‘How to stop wasting women's talents: overcome our fixation with youth’
  • Yasmin Boudia, ‘Can we use Virtual Reality to tackle ageism?’
  • Tessa Harding, ex-Help the Aged and NCV

How can the housing industry innovate for tomorrow's older consumers?

  • Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK
  • Lord Best, Co-Chair, APPG for Housing and Care for Older People
  • Nigel Howell, Chief Executive, FirstPort
  • Gary Day, Land and Planning Director, McCarthy & Stone
  • Sue Adams, Chief Executive, Care and Repair England

11.20 Short break

11.40 How can we save the NHS?

  • Rt Hon Stephen Dorrell, Chair, NHS Confederation
  • Dr David Oliver, Clinical Vice President, Royal College of Physicians
  • Baroness Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK
  • Pamela Spence, Partner, Life Sciences Industry Leader, EY

12.40 - 13:50: Lunch

A Death Café will be held over lunch, run by Louise Winter, Founder, Poetic Endings.

13.50 More inequalities in a world of austerity?

  • Anna Dixon, Chief Executive, Centre for Ageing Better
  • Inequality in Life Expectancy: Andrew Gaches, Head of Longevity, Life and Financial Services, Hymans Robertson
  • Inequalities in old age: Professor Tom Scharf, Professor of Social Gerontology, Newcastle University
  • Austerity and Health across Europe: Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing, ILC-UK

15:00 The Open Slot

15:10 Comfort break/coffee available

15:25 Workshops

Filling the skills gaps: Migration, more older workers, or both? 

  • Yvonne Sonsino, Partner and Innovation Leader, Mercer and Co-Chair DWP Fuller Working Lives Business Strategy Group
  • Professor Jonathan Portes, Professor of Economics and Public Policy, King’s College London
  • Dean Hochlaf, Assistant Economist, ILC-UK

Can we automate care?

  • Gordon Sutherland, Chief Executive, Tunstall
  • Eric Kihlstrom, Co-Founder, KareInn
  • Pamela Spence, Partner, Global Life Sciences Industry Leader, EY
  • George Holley-Moore, Research and Policy Manager, ILC-UK

​Can technology drive innovation in pensions, health and care?

  • ​Jason Whyte, Executive Director, UK Life and Pensions, EY
  • Dawid Konotey-Ahulu, Co-Founder, Redington
  • Erica Young, Director, Anthemis
  • Steve Lowe, Group Communications Director, Just

The future of the end: Living forever or dying in style

  • Professor Douglas Davies FBA, Professor of the Study of Religion, Durham University
  • Louise Winter, Founder, Poetic Endings
  • Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Manager, ILC-UK

16:35 Closing Keynote: Professor Andrew Scott, Professor of Economics, London Business School and author of ‘The 100 year life’

17.35 Reception

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TICKET TYPES

Corporate Rate

  • £299+VAT

Charity/ Not for Profit/ Uni /Individuals Rate

  • £210+VAT

PhD Students

  • £110+VAT

If you are a member of the ILC-UK Partners Programme, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk for a Partners Programme Discount Code.

CANCELLATIONS AND BOOKING AMENDMENTS
There is a £50 non-refundable charge on all bookings.
Cancellations within 14 days of the conference will be charged 50% of the purchased cost.
Cancellations within 7 days of the conference are non-refundable.
If you wish to transfer your ticket to a colleague, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
We have a range of sponsorship, advertising and promotional opportunities to suit your company's objectives and budget. Our team are dedicated to understanding your aims and will help to put together a bespoke package to suit your needs.
Please contact Fabiana Bertin or Dave Eaton on 0207 340 0440 or events@ilcuk.org.uk for more information.

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and EY for their sponsorship of this conference.

   

Conference supported by:

      

 

Speech to text services, kindly donated by Action on Hearing Loss:

To view the slides delivered at the 2016 ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference, please see below.

 

Research conducted by the International Longevity Centre (ILC-UK) has suggested that only 11 constituencies would have had different results in the 2015 General Election, had turnout rates of those between 18-34 matched that of the population over 65.

ILC-UK will present the research at a debate on the topic of “if young people ruled the world”, on Monday 22nd May (Voter Registration Deadline day).

Young people between 18-24 report “lower levels of knowledge about politics” and are “less likely” to participate in political activities than other age groups [1]. In the 2015 General election 78% of those over 65 turned out to vote, while only 43% of those between 18-24 and 54% between 25-34 turned out to vote.

Using data from Ipsos MORI and the ONS, it was found that 9 Conservative and 2 Liberal Democrat constituencies (including the seat of Nick Clegg, former deputy Prime Minister) would have swung to Labour, had the voting turnout of those between 18-34 matched that of the over-65’s and if these new voters reflected the national trend.



Source: Ipsos MORI – How Britain Voted in 2015

There are several reasons why the youth vote has such little influence:

  • Voters over 55 outnumber younger voters in 445 of the 573 constituencies in England and Wales.
  • Of these, 118 constituencies have over twice as many voters over 55 than younger voters.
  • Older voters were more homogenous in their voting preference in the 2015 election, with 47% voting Conservative, a 24-point lead over labour.
  • In contrast, Labour had a 16-point lead over the Conservatives amongst 18-24 year olds, but only a 6-point lead amongst 25-34 year olds.

The 9 Conservative seats which would have swung to Labour are: Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport, Derby North, Croydon Central, Gower, Brighton, Kemptown, Thurrock, Vale of Clwyd, Morley and Outwood, and Bury North.

The 2 Liberal Democrat seats which would have swung to Labour are: Leeds North West and Sheffield, Hallam.

According to ONS population projections, the number of younger people in the UK, below 30 is expected to decrease by 2050. In contrast, the number of over-65’s is expected to rise by almost 70%. This will likely consolidate the political power of older people further.

Attempting to get young people to vote through the promise of more influence is likely to be unhelpful in terms of long-term engagement, which is the key issue.

While voting is incredibly important, it is important for young people to engage in politics, to make their case for policies among the wider and older electorate. ILC-UK is calling for automatic registration, so that all eligible UK citizens, regardless of age or any other factor can be guaranteed a vote.

Dean Hochlaf, Assistant Economist at the ILC-UK says:

“Democracy isn’t something that stops when you leave the voting booth, it has enormous influence over our everyday lives. While attempts to get young people to vote are encouraging, we need to do more to stimulate active engagement in politics. An ageing society is going to put more pressure on government resources and voters will be taking this into consideration when they cast their ballots.

The challenge for young people is how do they take their case to the rest of the electorate for policies that are going to benefit their generation and build a more inclusive society. This might not be the easiest task, but it will be impossible if young people continue to be left out of the political debate”.

Notes

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

An ILC-UK Partners Programme Debate: If young people ruled the world?... Maximising the voice of younger people in an ageing society.

Wednesday, 22nd May 2017; 08:30 (for 09:00) - 11:00, Great Hall, Chartered Insurance Institute, 20 Aldermanbury, London EC2V 7HY, Chair by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE Register here: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/an_ilc_uk_partners_programme_debate_if_young_people_ruled_the_world..._maxi
 
________________________________________
[1] Apostolova. V, Uberoi. E, and Johnston, N. (2017) “Political disengagement in the UK: who is disengaged?” House of Commons Library, Briefing Paper, Number CBP7501, 26 April
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For immediate release: Thursday 18th May 2017

International Longevity Centre – UK and Cass Business School respond to Conservative manifesto

Social care reforms form a key part of the Conservative manifesto, launched earlier today.

Over the past few years, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and Cass Business School have worked together to propose a number of radical solutions to the care funding crisis. 

Here, they comment on the Conservative manifesto and set out the principles which they think will result in intergenerational fairness, a balance between the tax payer and individual responsibility and new savings mechanisms.

Professor Les Mayhew, Professor of Statistics, Cass Business School, said:
“Many of the measures proposed in the manifesto, including scrapping the cap an individual must pay for care and a greater focus on domiciliary care are sensible. 
“However, what is missing is the incentive for people to save for their care in later years.
“Bringing new money into the system is an essential part of a long term and sustainable solution. This will not happen unless there are changes to the means testing system and new incentives introduced to save and plan ahead.”

David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK commented:
“Whilst the cost to the tax payer for social care is dwarfed by the cost of health, it is increasingly recognised that a failure to tackle the care crisis will put increased pressure on health.
“The next Government must procrastinate on this issue no longer. We need incentives in place to convince individuals to make provision for their future care needs. The policy environment must be conducive to the financial services industry coming in with new products.
“We have witnessed 20 years of uncertainty and underinvestment in social care. Whoever wins the next election must simply get on with it.”

Professor Mayhew added:
“Worked and financially costed examples of new products and affordable payment options may be found in our research publications with ILC-UK and published in peer reviewed journals.”

Principles suggested by the ILC-UK and Cass include:

• An improved and more transparent means test that can be used for both domiciliary and institutional care including the removal of ‘cliff edges’ which cause abuse of the system presently.

• Measures to bring new money into the system by providing the necessary incentives to save and plan ahead

• The introduction of approved financial products to pay for care which take account of housing wealth as well as savings and income.

• Those who have saved to be treated more generously under means testing so that it pays to save for care.

ENDS

Media enquiries:
Amy Ripley, Senior Communications Officer, Cass Business School
T: +44 (0) 20 7040 3134, M: +44 (0) 7794 053 384, E: amy.ripley@city.ac.uk

References:
Means Testing Adult Social Care in England. The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, pp 1-30.
Paying for Care Costs in Later Life Using the Value in People’s Homes. The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice.
Personal Care Savings Bonds: A New Way of Saving Towards Social Care in Later Life. The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice.
Flexible and affordable methods of paying for long term care insurance. ILC-UK, London.

Notes to Editors:

Cass Business School
Cass Business School, which is part of City, University of London, is a leading global business school driven by world-class knowledge, innovative education and a vibrant community. Located in the heart of one of the world’s leading financial centres, Cass has strong links to both the City of London and the thriving entrepreneurial hub of Tech City. It is among the global elite of business schools that hold the gold standard of triple-crown accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), the Association of MBAs (AMBA) and the European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS).

ILC-UK
The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

Documents:

()
ILC-UK and Cass respond to Conservative Manifesto ()

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We are delighted to announce that our Chief Executive, Baroness Sally Greengross OBE has been awarded a special Lifetime Achievement award by the British Geriatric Society (BGS), on the occasion of their 70th anniversary celebrations.

At a ceremony attended by patients, members of the BGS, doctors, nurses and healthcare workers, HRH The Prince of Wales presented Baroness Greengross with the award for her contribution to improving services for older people, and her ongoing support for the BGS.

Baroness Greengross sits as a Crossbench Peer in the House of Lords, and serves as Vice-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia, and Co-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Ageing and Older People.

ILC-UK Update - March 2016

Since our last update, we have published six new reports, including work on defined benefit pension schemes, and sex and intimacy in later life.

We have also hosted nine events, including a roundtable discussion on the role of grandparents caring for grandchildren, and the launch of a new study on longevity and retirement communities.

We have also received press coverage in the UK, Italy, Russia, and India, and provided media commentary on policy areas as diverse as housing to social care.

ILC-UK Board of Trustees strengthened by new members

Since our last update we have been delighted to welcome Jilly Forster, Founder of the social change agency Forster Communications to our Board of Trustees.

With over 40 years' experience of running businesses and providing strategic communications direction to change-makers, Jilly brings a wealth of experience and enthusiasm to the ILC-UK's strategic planning.

Jilly joins Shaun Crawford and Diane Kenwood, who also joined our Board of Trustees in 2016. Shaun Crawford is Head of Ernst & Young's Global Insurance Business. He has been in the Financial Services industry for more than 30 years, and has authored such thought leading publications as 'Health Insurer of the Future', 'Senior Based Insurance' and 'Digital Insurance Transformation'.

Diane Kenwood is Editor of Woman's Weekly, and also sits on the Management Board of the company, and leads the internal Content Executive Committee. She has previously fronted programmes on BBC One, BBC Two, Sky News and Channel 4, as well as previously working for the Guardian. She also currently sits on the Management Board of the Woman of the Year Lunch, and on the Lay Advisory Board of Chai Cancer Care.

For more information about all of our Trustees, please click here.

ILC-UK Publications

Does living in a retirement village extend life expectancy? The case of Whiteley Village

This report investigates the possible benefits of retirement village life with respect to life expectancy.

The Grandparent Army

This report examines the support grandparents who provide childcare to their grandchildren receive, and how grandparents feel about providing it.

How long will I love you? Sex and intimacy in later life

What factors affect our experiences of our intimate relationships as we grow older? This report examines the sexual and intimate lives of older adults, using survey data of men and women aged 50 to 90+ living in England.

Flexible and affordable methods of paying for long term care insurance

This new ILC-UK/Cass Business School report explores different methods of funding long term care insurance.

The end of the beginning? Private defined benefit pensions and the new normal

This report explores the scale of the defined benefit pensions' crisis, outlines its implications for firms and employees and considers possible solutions.

The Missing £Billions: The economic cost of hailing to adapt our high street to respond to demographic change

This report looks at barriers to consumption in later life, and how best to address them to increase spending amongst the over 50s.

ILC-UK Events

Roundtable discussion: The value of advice

Tuesday, 21st March, 14:30 - 16:30
Central London

This private roundtable event will assemble policy experts to discuss the impact of independent financial advice.

Chaired by David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK, this discuss will inform a major new report from the ILC-UK, to be launched later this year. The report will map the characteristics of people who receive financial advice, and detail the medium-term economic impact of expert financial advice on consumer outcomes.

This event is an invitation only event.

An ILC-UK and Mile End Institute debate: If young people ruled the world?... Maximising the voice of younger people in an ageing society
Wednesday, 22nd March; 17:00 (for 17:30) - 19:30
House of Lords

Recent elections and referenda in the UK have implied a growing intergenerational divide. Older people have voted in larger proportions than younger cohorts leading to vocal concerns from journalists, politicians, and academics that older people are having an increasingly dominant impact on UK politics.

But how real is this intergenerational divide? During this debate we will explore whether, and how policy can be respond. We will explore:

- Why are younger people poorly engaged in elections?

- What does an ageing society mean for the future of participation by younger people?

- What are the policy solutions: How can we get young people more engaged in elections?

If you are interested in attending this event, please contact events@ilcuk.org.uk.

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our last update, we have published a summary of our press highlights from November to February, 'ILC-UK in the news - November 2016 - February 2017', including links to stories featuring ILC-UK research, analysis and commentary.

We have published two expert guest blogs recently, addressing the defined benefit pensions crisis, and the future of smart housing. The first blog is authored by Lawrence Churchill CBE, Chair of the Pensions Policy Institute.

Entitled 'The defined benefit crisis: Liabilities and broken promises' this blog is a summary of the response to the crisis given by Lawrence at the launch of 'The end of the beginning'. In it, he outlines the fundamental issues that need to be addressed to ensure a sustainable DB pension system.

Our second recent guest blog is by Paul Teverson, Director of Communications at McCarthy & Stone, entitled 'Home Smart Homes?'. It provides an outline of the technologies which are helping to create responsive home environments, whilst also recognising the persistent need for a personal 'human' touch, even in the cognitive home of the future.

If you would like to contribute an article to our guest blog, please contact Dave Eaton at davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.
For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

Working with ILC-UK

Research and Events

Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

Press

If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

For Immediate Release

Previous ILC-UK Research (1) has shown how household spending steadily falls as we get older.

Today’s “Family Spending” (2) evidence from ONS, shows a similar trend, with households headed by a person aged 75 and over spending substantially less than their younger counterparts.[1]

However, this new evidence suggests that the trend might be changing and that younger people are starting to spend a bit less, while older people seem to be spending more.

In 2016, younger households (aged 30 or less) spend on average £51 (or 11%) less per week than in 2015; conversely, households headed by someone aged 75 and over spend a little bit more, approximately £16 (or 6%) per week than in 2016. Expenditure for the other age groups has remained pretty much unchanged.

These changes have been driven by younger households spending less on education (-£16 per week); household goods and services (-£8 per week); transport (-£7 per week); and restaurants and hotels (-£6.2 per week).

Conversely, spending by older people (aged 75 and over) has increased because they spent a bit more on: household goods and services (+£7.8 per week); restaurants (+£4.3 per week); and miscellaneous goods and services, such as personal care, social protection etc. (+£6.3).

Cesira Urzi-Brancati, Research Fellow, ILC-UK said 
“Let’s not get too excited about these changing spending patterns. It is still the case that we spend less and less as we get older. And the over 75s spend less than younger people. But for many older people, it isn’t a lack of money, but more of a lack of opportunity which stops them spending. With a growing older population, Government and industry must look to open up spending by this group of the population”.

(1) ILC-UK previous research, “The Missing £Billions” and “Understanding Retirement Journeys”, reveals how expenditure on non-durable consumption steadily declines with age, even after we account for household size and composition, income, health and so on.

(2)https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity...

About us
The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

Press Release

For Immediate Release: 07 February 2017

Leading think tank urges retirement housing revolution to fix the housing crisis

Research finds that although 9 in 10 65-79 year olds live in under occupied houses, there could be a retirement housing gap of 160,000 houses by 2030 if Government fails to focus on last time buyers

Responding to Housing Minister Gavin Barwell’s suggestion that making it easier for older people to downsize could help solve the housing crisis, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) has urged Government to ensure thousands of new retirement properties are built as a matter of urgency.

ILC-UK Chief Executive Baroness Sally Greengross has also called on the Government to introduce a duty on Local Authorities to assess the needs of their older populations when making housing plans, and ensure that these needs are met before plans are put in place.

Research conducted by the ILC-UK has found:

  • Nearly 9 in 10 of the 65-79 age group live in under-occupied housing – over 50% live in homes with two or more excess bedrooms.
  • There are around 515,000 specialist retirement and extra care homes in England. However, this means that there is only enough specialist housing to accommodate 5% of the over-65 population.
  • According to ILC-UK calculations, there could be a retirement housing gap of 160,000 retirement housing by 2030 if current trends continue. By 2050, the gap could grow to 376,000.

The ILC-UK also found that those in retirement housing are significantly more likely to be living in homes with adaptations than those who do not. Approximately 87% of those in retirement housing have home adaptations, by comparison to around 60% in other types of housing.

Therefore, as well as freeing up a range of properties throughout the housing market, downsizing in later life could help to ensure more people can stay in their homes for longer, reducing pressure on the residential care sector.

Surveys conducted by the ILC-UK have also found that there are several reasons why older people do not downsize. One is a supply problem; the lack of suitable housing on the market. Another is financial considerations in terms of moving; stamp duty can be a major barrier.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK said:

'The Housing Minister is right to recognise that meeting the needs of last time buyers and encouraging downsizing is crucial to addressing the housing crisis. Downsizing can also ensure that older people live in properties that allow them to stay in their own homes for longer, and can release equity that can be used to fund social care in later live.

However, unless Government acts to encourage local authorities and developers to meet the needs of last time buyers, there could be a retirement housing gap of 160,000 retirement homes by 2030. If current trends continue, the gap could grow to 376,000 homes by 2050.

Local Authorities must have a duty to assess the needs of their older population when making housing plans, and ensure that these needs are met before plans are put in place.

Government should also consider what changes can be made to Stamp Duty to remove the perceived financial barrier of downsizing'.

Contact

Dave Eaton at ILC-UK davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk 02073400440 or 07531 164 886

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.


Notes to Editors

Full references are available in The State of the Nation’s Housing. To produce The State of the Nation’s Housing, ILC-UK has analysed data available through wave 7 of the The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and data from the English Housing Survey. The report also incorporates analysis of other official data sets including those produced by ONS and Government Departments.

The State of the Nation’s Housing is available to download at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/the_state_of_the_nations_housing_an_ilc_uk_factpack

Survey data is available in Generation Stuck: Exploring the reality of downsizing in later life, available to download at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/generation_stuck_exploring_the_reality_of_downsizing_in_later_life

ILC-UK is the leading think-tank on ageing and demographic change. We have over 15 years’ experience of producing ground breaking research, policy analysis and debate. 

Presenting current and futures research on economic policy, families and community, health and social care, migration and integration, transport and planning, work and wellbeing. Issue and impact driven – we aim to improve public policy and practice both at the national and international level. We are solutions focussed and all our reports include targeted recommendations for future action.

Over the last year, we have enjoyed great success both in terms of our impact and reach:
*Producing over 35 reports.
*Holding over 50 high level events and conferences.
*Featuring in every UK national newspaper and international publications, contributing to national TV and Radio debates and reaching an international Twitter audience of more than 5 million.

We need a Research Fellow with excellent analytical ability and strong writing skills who has a passion for, and understanding of, UK public policy. You must be able to work at a rapid pace, conducting secondary analysis of literature and evidence including data. Alongside this, you will be need to be able develop your own narrative including drawing together interesting and salient conclusions and recommendations to influence UK public policy. You must be able to work on multiple projects at the same time with competing deadlines. Ideally candidates will also have some experience in project management, client liaison, proposal development and wider fundraising activities.

This role would suit an individual with two to three years’ experience in a public policy or research environment. You will need strong analytical ability including high level competency in interpreting and communicating complex data analysis. A broad understanding of, and interest in, current economic and social policy debates is a must.

Key skills:
1. Essential: Two to three years’ experience in a public policy or research environment.

2. Essential Ability to interpret and use complex data to develop a strong narrative and produce impactful policy solutions.

3. Essential: A track record of drafting and publishing reports or articles at speed.

4. Essential: Understanding and experience of analysing key UK health, social and/or economic public policy.

5. Essential: Ability to write engaging articles, briefs and reports for different audiences.

6. Essential: Ability to work independently in a highly-pressured environment and to tight deadlines.

7. Essential: Ability to offer support and guidance to more junior members of the research team as well as work with other members of the team.

8. Desirable: A Masters or higher degree in Social Sciences with research methods component including quantitative analysis.

9. Desirable: Experience of fundraising through leading on, or contributing to, tenders or project proposals from ideally a range of funders, including Government, academic trusts, foundations and charities.

10. Desirable: Demonstrable interest or experience of working on ageing related issues and a knowledge or interest of the public policy environment in this field, including policy development and the political process.

11. Desirable: Experience or interest in the dissemination of research and the presentation of results in an academic, public or policy setting.

12. Desirable: Experience of leading or contributing to tenders or project proposals.

The ILC-UK envisages this post to be a full-time position but is happy to consider part-time arrangements, flexible working and secondments for the right candidate.

Send a (maximum) two-page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Director of Research and Strategy at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.

If selected for interview you will be asked to produce a short sample of your written work.

Hours 5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible for the right candidate)
Duration of contract Permanent
Salary £25,000-£35,000 depending on experience
Application deadline 27th February
Interview date 14-20th March
Start date ASAP
Place of Work Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Please note that due to the high volume of applications, we are unable to notify unsuccessful applicants. If you have not been notified of the outcome of your application within four weeks of the closing date, please assume you have been unsuccessful on this occasion.

Documents:

JD Research Fellow ()

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ILC-UK is the leading think-tank on ageing and demographic change. We have over 15 years’ experience of producing ground breaking research, policy analysis and debate. 

Presenting current and futures research on economic policy, families and community, health and social care, migration and integration, transport and planning, work and wellbeing. Issue and impact driven – we aim to improve public policy and practice both at the national and international level. We are solutions focussed and all our reports include targeted recommendations for future action. 

Over the last year, we have enjoyed great success both in terms of our impact and reach:
*Producing over 35 reports.
*Holding over 50 high level events and conferences in conjunction with Number 10 Downing Street, members of the royal family, Ministers and celebrities.
*Featuring in every UK national newspaper and international publications, contributing to national TV and Radio debates and reaching an international Twitter audience of more than 5 million.

We need an economic analyst to lead on quantitative economic research projects, to feed their analysis into the wider work of the team, and to communicate research findings via engagement with policymakers and media.

The successful candidate will therefore need to be able to link data analysis to current economic policy debates, have well-honed writing skills and be able to explain complex economic ideas in plain language.

The ability to interpret and manipulate data is a must. In particular, applicants will need to be familiar with the mathematical and statistical techniques of applied economics, as well as statistical computing methods. For instance, in the role we would envisage the job holder using STATA, SPSS or an equivalent statistical software package to derive new insight from large micro datasets such as the Wealth and Assets Survey, the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, Labour Force Survey or Family Resources survey (amongst others).

The role would suit an outstanding individual with extensive experience in using economic analysis in a research or policy environment. We’re particularly interested in candidates with experience in researching issues around pensions and financial capability, the labour market or housing.

Key skills
1. Essential: A Masters or higher degree in economics or equivalent training and work experience.

2. Essential: Experience of analysing large social science datasets, such as ELSA, LFS, WAS or FRS.

3. Essential: Experience of devising and planning analytical work, from researching appropriate methods to resolving methodological challenges.

4. Essential: Experience in the dissemination of research and the presentation of results in an academic, public policy or industry setting.

5. Essential: A track record of drafting and publishing reports or articles at speed.

6. Essential: Experience of presenting research findings and policy implications to non-technical audiences, both in writing and verbally in a range of formats.

7. Essential: Sound project management skills with experience of managing own time effectively and working on a number of projects simultaneously.

8. Essential: Ability to work independently but to offer support and guidance to junior members of the team as well as work with other team members.

9. Desirable: Experience of fundraising through leading on, or contributing to, tenders or project proposals from ideally a range of funders, including Government, academic trusts, foundations and charities.

10. Desirable: Demonstrable interest or experience of working on ageing related issues and a knowledge or interest of public policy environment in this field including policy development and the political process.

11. Desirable: Knowledge of UK public policy debates around the future of pension provision, financial capability, housing or the labour market. 

12. Desirable: Have an existing network among relevant academic/public policy community.

----------------------------
The ILC-UK envisages this post to be a full-time position but is happy to consider part-time arrangements, flexible working and secondments for the right candidate.

Send a (maximum) two page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Director of Research and Strategy at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.

If selected for interview you will be asked to produce a short sample of your written work.

Hours 5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible for the right candidate)
Application deadline 27th February
Duration of contract Permanent
Interview date 14-20th March
Salary £35,000-£45,000 depending on experience
Start date ASAP
Place of Work Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Please note that due to the high volume of applications, we are unable to notify unsuccessful applicants. If you have not been notified of the outcome of your application within four weeks of the closing date, please assume you have been unsuccessful on this occasion.

Documents:

JD Economic Analyst ()

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Press Release

For Immediate Release, Thursday, 22nd December


Think tank finds that if between 2000 and 2015 the money that was used to plug private defined benefit pension deficits had instead been redirected towards wages, average salaries would be £1,473 higher.

‘The End of the Beginning? Private defined benefit pensions and the new normal’, a report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) to be published in January also reveals:

  • Since the year 2000, pension contributions have accounted for an increasingly large proportion of total employee compensation. Where wages once accounted for more than 87% of total compensation, they now account for around 83%.
  • While some of those pension contributions will be for current employees, and therefore represents deferred consumption, around half has been for servicing the deficits of DB pensions which have since closed to new members.
  • The number of retirees receiving a DB pension will remain in the millions well into the latter half of this century – 3 million by 2060 and 1 million by 2070.

The collapse of BHS and concerns over the future of Tata Steel have put the sustainability of private sector defined benefit (DB) pension schemes firmly into the spotlight. These types of DB schemes promise a set payment to their members in retirement based on salary and years of service, but there are growing concerns that many such schemes and their sponsors will be unable to fulfil their promises at a time of rising life expectancy and falling interest rates.

Through new analysis of the Office for National Statistics’ National Accounts, the report finds that if the resources used to plug rising DB deficits had been directed towards boosting the pay of current workers, wages may have been, on average, as much as 6% higher (£1,473) in 2015.

While around half of all DB schemes are now closed to new members, the number of retirees receiving a DB pension will remain in the millions well into the latter half of this century – 3 million by 2060 and 1 million by 2070.


Source: Author’s calculations based on ONS National Accounts

‘The End of the Beginning? Private defined benefit pensions and the new normal’, supported by Ince and Co LLP and to be published by the ILC-UK in January will examine the scale of the DB pensions’ challenge, outlining what its implications have been for firms and employees, and how economic and demographic trends could shape the its future.

The report will make a series of policy recommendations to help ensure the long-term sustainability of both DB schemes, and the companies and employees funding them.

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing, ILC-UK said:

While the vast majority of private sector DB schemes have closed to new members or future accrual, their impact on individuals, firms and the economy as a whole is likely to be long felt. Our analysis suggests that plugging pension deficits has acted as an opportunity cost – supporting the pensions of retirees at the cost of investing in the current workforce. This situation will not change overnight. Based on conservative assumptions about future life expectancy and mortality, we estimate that DB pensions will continue to be paid out well into the latter half of this century.

We call on government, regulators and industry to devise solutions that move away from simply securing full member benefits and towards those that build in a recognition for the wider societal and economic challenges associated with continued DB pension deficits. 

Jennifer Donohue, Head of Global Corporate and Transactional Insurance, Ince and Co LLP said:

Company executives, pension trustees and all DB stakeholders need to adapt to a society where funds of DB schemes cannot provide for forty or fifty years of  retirement. Recognition of this legacy issue, and finding solutions to it, is the responsibility of all stakeholders, corporates, the government and scientists as we face a United Kingdom where a third of all babies born three years ago are now predicted to live to a hundred years old.

There is a nascent market of “gifted structurers” who can provide short, medium and long term (some as long as sixty years) solutions to the deficits problem. These solutions need to be accepted, expanded and developed if a societal calamity is to be avoided.

Notes

‘The End of the Beginning? Private defined benefit pensions and the new normal’ will be launched on Wednesday, 18th January with a panel debate of pensions policy experts. If you are interested in attending, please contact Dave Eaton at davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Contact

Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk on 07531 164 886)

About us

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

Press Release

For Immediate Release

21st December 2016

Struggling for a Christmas present for Nan? Take her for a meal or to the theatre.

A new report “The Missing £Billions” by the Internatonal Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and supported by Anchor, Englands largest not-for-profit provider of housing and care for older people, hightlights how people aged over 75 are missing out on leisure and social activities they want to do, resulting in a big economic hit to local economies.

  • 1.2 million over 75s want to go to the cinema more often and 1.8 million over 75s want to eat out more often.
  • Over a million people aged 75+ would like to go more often to art galleries and museums.
  • Nearly 1.8 million people aged 75+ would like to go to the theatre more often.
  • Older women would like to go out more often than men, and especially to the theatre.

The research reveals that while only a tiny proportion (between 4.7% and 7.1%) of consumers aged over 50 engage in cultural activities, such as going to the cinema, theatre, and museums, at least once a month, between a third and a quarter of the 50+ would like to do more.

While six in ten consumers aged over 50 go out to eat at least once a month, roughly four in ten of this age group would like to eat out more often.

The new research, based on new analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing reveals that as we get older we spend less: for every year beyond the age of 55, average (equivalised) household expenditure on food and groceries, eating out, clothing, and leisure declines by approximately 1%.
  
Yet the barriers to spending aren’t just about money. As we get older, we are less likely to report that we don’t have enough money to meet our needs. When asked how often they have too little money to spend on their needs, almost six in ten (58.3%) people aged over 80 reply ‘Never’, as opposed to one in four 50-54 (25.2% of 50-54 year olds).

The report highlights how older consumers with health impairments or disabilities are spending less than those without such conditions
• Older people with a walking difficulty spend on average 14.5% less than those without such a disability.
• People aged 50+ with poor eyesight spend 9-10% less on leisure and eating out.

Living in a rural area has a mixed impact on spending. It is associated with 12.1% less spending on clothes and 7.8% less on leisure activities, regardless of age, income, health barriers, and having access to a car. By contrast, people living in rural areas spend on average 7.2% more on eating out than those who live in urban areas. Over half (56%) of people aged 75+ living in rural areas have no access to internet yet a lack of internet access is associated with 28% lower spending.

The research reveals there are significant economic benefits of having internet for people with a walking difficulty: while people aged 50-64 with a walking difficulty and no access to internet spend on average £215 a week on the four items mentioned before, people in the same age group with a walking difficulty who can shop online spend on average £286, that is up to £70 more.

Cesira Urzi Brancati, Research Fellow at ILC-UK said:

‘Older people who suffer from arthritis or have walking difficulties are at risk of being more isolated, because they can’t go out as much as they would like to. We must ensure that leisure activities are as accessible as possible; also, improving internet access may help some of us spend more money as we age’

Anchor is ‘Standing Up 4 Sitting Down' as it calls on shops and retailers to do their bit to reduce older people’s loneliness and subsequent health issues by providing adequate seating in store and on the high street. This follows findings that the economy risks losing up to £3.8 billion a year through a lack of accessibility for many older people.

Anchor’s Chief Executive, Jane Ashcroft, CBE, said:

“It’s unjust for older people not to have equal access to shops and leisure activities. This generation is often cut off from the online world, so it’s crucial we enable them to connect in other ways. Standing Up 4 Sitting Down calls for change that benefits everyone. For shops, providing seating is a great opportunity to boost footfall and spending. For older people, it offers the opportunity for important social contact to tackle loneliness, encourages physical exercise, and allows a generation the chance to live later life to its fullest.”

For more information about Standing Up 4 Sitting Down and to lend your support to the campaign, go to www.su4sd.org.uk, call 0800 731 2020 or follow us on twitter using #su4sd.

Contact
Dave Eaton: 02073400440 Davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk

Derya Filiz at Anchor: derya.filiz@anchor.org.uk

Notes

“The Missing £Billions” will be published on 21st December on the ILC-UK website.

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

ILC-UK gratefully acknowledge the Office for National Statistics, for collecting the Living Costs and Food Survey (2014), and NatCen for the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (2014/15). Data were made available by the UK Data Service.

About Standing Up 4 Sitting Down

Anchor is calling on shops, retailers, shopping centres and high streets to pledge on su4sd.org.uk  to maintain or increase the number of seats they provide.

The campaign aims to:

  • Provide MPs, planners, businesses and the public with a better understanding about the challenges older people face on the high street
  • Encourage a change in practice that sees the provision of seating as the norm

Shops and retailers can back the campaign by signing up at http://www.su4sd.org.uk and applying for free window stickers.
Members of the public and MPs can support by encouraging local shops and retailers to sign up for Standing Up 4 Sitting Down and engaging in conversations online using #su4sd.

About Anchor

With almost 40,000 customers in 1,000 locations, Anchor is a charity and England’s largest not-for-profit provider of housing and care to older people. Anchor provides a range of services from rented and leasehold retirement properties to residential care homes, specialist dementia care homes and retirement villages.

Press Release

For Immediate Release

15/12/16

Social care precept increases won’t benefit the areas which need it most.
Potential funding increases are ‘no-where near adequate’ to sustain adult social care.

New analysis conducted by economists at the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) has found that a 3% social care precept wouldn’t benefit the local authorities which needed it most.

  • • 3% precept in Tower Hamlets raises £160 for every person over the age of 65. This is despite the fact it has a very low proportion of older people (just 6% are over 65).
  • • By contrast, West Somerset only brings in £53 per older person, despite having the highest proportion of older people in the country.

Raising the precept will be far more effective for some local authorities than others. ILC-UK analysis shows that a rise in the precept from 2 to 3% will bring in more money per older person for those local authorities where the older population accounts for a smaller overall proportion. In other words, those local authorities that need the money most, will bring in the least. This is shown on the chart below (each dot represents a local authority).

[Source ILC-UK analysis of DCLG and ONS data]

 

How much would a 3% levy raise per older person?


[Source ILC-UK analysis of DCLG and ONS data]


Ben Franklin, Head of Economics at ILC-UK said: “Sadly, this announcement seems to be about spin not substance. Simply raising the precept will be no-where near adequate to meeting the care needs of the UK’s ageing population and will exacerbate the extreme post-code lottery that already exists for people trying to access care services. The promise that local authorities can keep the new homes bonus is a sticking plaster on top of a sticking plaster.
The sector faces significant short and long term pressures including meeting the new living wage and supporting an increasing number of older people with complex care needs. Yet, the level of funding does not reflect this. We urgently need a new settlement. The cracks cannot be papered over any longer.”   

Contact: Ben Franklin at ILC-UK 02073400440 benfranklin@ilcuk.org.uk
About ILC-UK The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change. www.ilcuk.org.uk



Since our October update, we have published two new reports: our second annual State of the Nation report on alcohol and over 50s, and our Economic Insight paper on the 2016 Autumn Statement.

We also hosted our second annual Future of Ageing Conference, and organised discussions covering antimicrobial resistance in an ageing society, global savings challenges and innovations in the care workforce.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our LinkedIn Group.

Thank you for all of your support this year

This year, we have published 18 reports (with a 19th to be launched towards the end of December), and hosted more than 50 events (attended by more than 1100 people). We are very grateful for the support offered to us by all of our research funders, Partners and collaborators.

On behalf of the International Longevity Centre - UK, Baroness Sally Greengross and David 'Santa' Sinclair would like to wish you a merry Christmas, and a happy and prosperous new year.

If you would like to support our work, please click here to donate to the ILC-UK via our Secure BT My Donate Portal.

ILC-UK Publications

Easing the transition: The relationship between alcohol and labour market activity in the over 50s population of the UK

This report sets out the specific barriers and challenges faced by over 50s with current or previous drinking problems at three stages of labour market activity: unemployment, employment and retirement.

Economic Insight: The 2016 Autumn Statement

In the latest ILC-UK Economic Insight paper, we analyse what the 2016 Autumn Statement means for savings and conclude with a short discussion about UK savings policy.

ILC-UK Events

Costing care: New approaches to means-testing and funding adult social care

Wednesday 14th December; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) - 18:30 (followed by a short drinks reception)
Staple Inn Hall, Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, High Holborn, London WC1V 7QJ

This ILC-UK, IFoA and Cass Business School joint event will launch a new paper which reviews the present and proposed formula for means-testing adult social care in England.

Chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK, the launch will include a keynote presentation from report author, Professor Les Mayhew, Professor of Statistics, Faculty of Actuarial Science and Insurance, Cass Business School, and a response from an expert panel of actuaries and related professionals.

This event is currently operating a waiting list. To join the waiting list, please follow the link below.
Please click here to join the waiting list for this event.

Legal & General sponsor the ILC-UK website

We are delighted to announce that Legal & General has agreed to sponsor our website for three years from November 2016.

Kerrigan Procter, Managing Director, Legal & General Retirement said:

'We are delighted to sponsor the International Longevity Centre’s website and support their work as the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change'.

Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive added:

'Legal & General are one of ILC-UK’s founding Partners and as such we have worked with them for many years. We are delighted that they have agreed to sponsor our website for three years. This important support will help us continue to deliver our independent analysis of demographic change'.

Please click here for more information.

Stay informed on immunisation updates throughout Europe

Given the ILC-UK's interest in lifecourse approaches to policy, preventative health and healthy ageing, we run the European Adult Immunisation Hub; a website dedicated to providing multimedia resources for organisations interested in promoting adult immunisation to policy makers across Europe.

The Hub hosts new research reports into the cost-benefit and efficacy of adult immunisation as a public health measure, videos and infographics, and patient stories to use in conjunction with research reports to advocate for adult immunisation.

Recent stories include 'Why tweeting when you're ill could help boost immunisation rates', and 'The threat posed by antimicrobial resistance'.

If you would like to contribute to the Hub, please contact Dave Eaton at davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

Working with ILC-UK

Research and Events

Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

Press

If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

Employers ‘letting down’ over 50s on risks of alcohol in later life – new report

  • Recent retirees are more likely to drink every day
  • Almost one third of older drinkers in the professional occupational class drink 5-7 days a week
  • A quarter of the professional occupational class aged 60-69 drink heavily – more than under 30s
  • Those retiring before 60 and after 75 are more likely to be high-risk drinkers

Older adults in employment and facing retirement are being let down by employers when it comes to problem drinking, a report released today states.

The report written by ILC-UK and commissioned by Drink Wise, Age Well, urges employers and government to take more action to help over 50s in employment or facing retirement to avoid serious alcohol problems in later life.

It highlights retirement as a ‘danger point’ for problem drinking, with recent retirees over 50 being more likely to drink every day. Additionally, those retiring before 60 are more likely to become a high-risk drinker, as are those working beyond the age of 75.

It concludes that there is currently a ‘blind spot’ in support from employers and the state in preparing for retirement which falls short of emotional, health and social changes. For millions of people facing later retirement in the future, the report represents a clarion call.

For those over 50s still employed stress, boredom, lack of control over work and retirement worries all contribute to drinking more. Earlier this year the Drink Wise, Age Well survey revealed that as many as 1 in 4 older adults would not ask for help with an alcohol problem if they needed it.  For those who drank more than they used to, 40% cited retirement as a reason for doing so.

Other findings include:

  • Nearly 30% of over 50s in the ‘professional’ occupational classes drink 5-7 days a week, the highest of any occupational class
  • Almost a quarter of older groups in the highest professions drink more than their younger counterparts
  • Alcohol problems can cost UK employers money in terms of workplace absence and lost productivity – around 7.3 billion a year

Over 50s who have been out of work and recovered from an alcohol problem still face further barriers in getting back into work. Only 16% of employers said they would consider employing someone with a previous alcohol problem, leaving some of the UK’s most experienced workers who want to work unable to realise their potential.

The authors of the report call for employers to introduce measures to assist employees over 50 who might be struggling with an alcohol problem, such as counselling and effective workplace policies that treat alcohol issues like any other health issue.

For those into retirement, the report calls for GPs to factor in the effects of retirement when giving advice on reducing risk from alcohol. The report also calls for greater engagement from employers to staff pre and post-retirement. This includes social clubs and guidance on how to avoid alcohol becoming a problem once working life is over.

Julie Breslin, head of programme for Drink Wise, Age Well said:

“People aged over 50 who are out of work, may struggle more than any other age group to get employment. Add this to someone over 50 who is in recovery from problem drinking, and there is a compounded stigma. However, people in recovery will often have so much more to offer a workplace; experience, loyalty and commitment, and by making employment opportunities more accessible everyone benefits.

Additionally, people who are approaching retirement age will have given much of their life to the workplace and supporting their employer’s success. It is only right that there is an investment from the workplace into their well-being particularly as they approach retirement. There should be a holistic approach to retirement which includes health and well-being. Providing people with knowledge and awareness, and coping strategies to manage the transition hopefully means people won’t turn to increased alcohol use if they are struggling”

David McCullough, chief executive of Royal Voluntary Service said:

“Retirement is like a cliff edge and often older people go from having a busy schedule and colleagues to interact with, to days where they might not see anyone or even have a conversation on the phone. It doesn’t take long for loneliness to set in and drinking a little more than they should each day can quickly become the norm. It’s vital that people facing retirement or those recently retired, remain mentally and physically active and engaged in their community and we would urge employers to ensure they have the necessary support and guidance in place to help employees with what can be a very steep transition.”

Baroness Sally Greengross, chief executive of the International Longevity Centre – UK said:

“As our population ages, the importance of older employees continues to grow.

A healthy and happy older workforce is vital, and having a better relationship with alcohol can help towards this. This report shows that many older adults are reaching retirement drinking potentially harmful amounts, and there is a need for increased support from employers in treating alcohol problems as they would other health problems.

Employers, health professionals and family members should be having these potentially difficult conversations sooner rather than later, to prevent serious alcohol related harm developing later in life”.

The report is available to download here.

Notes to Editors:

  • The report was compiled from existing health and social-related data and took evidence from working and retired over 50s, and employers at a series of enquiries at the House of Lords.
  • The AUDIT Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test identifies three categories of drinker:

o LOWER RISK: This group is defined as: AUDIT score of 0-7 Or: Men who regularly drink 3-4 units per day. Women who regularly drink 2-3 units per day. This group is defined as ‘lower risk’ rather than ‘no risk, as evidence is accumulating that no level of alcohol use is without risk entirely. This is particularly true for older adults.

o INCREASING RISK DRINKERS This group is defined as: AUDIT score of 8-15 or Men who regularly drink more than 3 to 4 units a day, but less than the higher risk levels. Women who regularly drink more than 2 to 3 units a day, but less than the higher risk levels.

o HIGHER RISK DRINKERS This group is defined as: AUDIT score of 16+ or Men who regularly drink more than 8 units a day or more than 50 units of alcohol per week. (5 bottles of wine or 20 pints). Women who regularly drink more than 6 units a day or more than 35 units of alcohol per week. (14 pints lager or 3 ½ bottles of wine)

  • High Risk drinkers are defined in this research as respondents in Understanding Society who drink more than five times a week and who drink more than eight units in a typical day.
  • Recent retirees are defined as respondents in Understand Society who retired between waves four and five.
  • Drink Wise, Age Well will be delivered over a seven year period by a consortium led overall by Addaction and in Northern Ireland by Addiction Northern Ireland, and including Royal Voluntary Service, International Longevity Centre UK and Drug and Alcohol Charities Wales. The programme will be evaluated by an academic team led by the University of Bedfordshire’s Substance Misuse and Ageing Research Team (SMART

Each partner will take the lead in a demonstration area:

  • Western Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland: Addiction Northern Ireland (contact Director Thelma Abernethy or Locality Manager Joanne Smith )
  • Cwm Taf Wales: Drug Aid (Director, Caroline Phipps or Locality Manager Richard Broadway)
  • Devon County, England:  Addaction (Contact Clare Pawley)
  • Sheffield City, England : Royal Voluntary Service- (Contact Emma Wells)
  • Glasgow City, Scotland: Addaction (Contact Graeme Callander)
  • Research and Evaluation: Sarah Wadd, SMART who will lead a UK wide academic team
  • Policy- Sally-Marie Bamford, ILC-UK
  • The Big Lottery Fund supports the aspirations of people who want to make life better for their communities across the UK. It is responsible for giving out 40% of the money raised by the National Lottery and invests over £650 million a year in projects big and small in health, education, environment and charitable purposes.
     
  • Since June 2004 it has awarded over £8 billion to projects that change the lives of millions of people. Every year it funds 13,000 small local projects tackling big social problems like poor mental health and homelessness. Since the National Lottery began in 1994, £34 billion has been raised and more than 450,000 grants awarded.

Press Release

For Immediate Release

5 December 2016

Think Tank urges action to improve uptake of Shingles Vaccine among older people

Responding to the news of falls in uptake of the shingles vaccination, the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC-UK) has urged a change to its eligibility guidelines.

Public Health England has reported a decline in the uptake of the Shingles vaccination in both the routine (70 year old) and catch up (78 years old) cohorts (from 61.8% in 2013/14 to 54.9% in 2015/16 and from 57.8% in 2014/15 to 55.5% in 2015/16, respectively).

In 2013, ILC-UK published “Immune Response”, calling for a lifecourse approach to immunisation and making 30 plus recommendations for policy action.

In 2015, ILC-UK launched a European Adult Immunisation Hub, which seeks to provide information and news about adult immunisation across Europe.

David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK and Editor of the European Adult Immunisation Hub said:

“Vaccination is not just for kids. In an ageing society we need a much greater focus on improving awareness and uptake of vaccination among adults.

Anything we can do to reduce likelihood of pain is of huge importance in old age, with 6 in 10 people in their mid-70s suffering from pain.

Shingles can be a significant cause of pain in old age and vaccination is an effective way of reducing the likelihood that we will suffer from it. We must ensure that older people eligible for the Shingles vaccination take up their right to receive it.

Some parts of the country have very low coverage of the Shingles vaccine among eligible people. It is important that Public Health England and the Department of Health work to ensure that we don’t see emerging a postcode lottery in access to the vaccine.

The complexity of the age of eligibility guidelines for shingles will no doubt be hampering the ability to communicate uptake to relevant individuals. Perhaps now is the time to extend eligibility to everyone between 70 and 80, after all, all of these people are at risk and would benefit from vaccination.”

Details of who is eligible for a shingles vaccine are available here: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vaccinations/Pages/who-can-have-the-shingles-vaccine.aspx

See the European Adult Immunisation Website for more information about the latest figures for Shingles uptake: http://www.adultimmunisation.eu/shinglesherpes-zoster/shingles-vaccination-uptake-falls-england/

Contact

David Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) 02073400440 or 07851042609

Notes

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.


The European Adult Immunisation Hub is available at: http://www.adultimmunisation.eu/.

Economic Insight by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), published following the Autumn Statement, paints a bleak picture for future pensioners. ILC-UK analysis reveals that:

  • By 2022, economic output per person will be over 25% smaller than we would have expected it to be before the crisis. This economic weakness has impacted on household finances.
  • Real wages will be £11,600 (or 31%) below what we would have expected them to be before the crisis. This has made it harder to save.
  • Bank Rate is expected to remain firmly in the zero lower bound, while returns on long dated government bonds are likely to remain at historically low levels. This means savings will not go as far.
  • The household savings ratio has been falling and is expected to remain low up to 2022. This is despite the continued roll out of automatic enrolment.

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics at ILC-UK said:

“The picture painted by the Autumn statement is bad economic news for savers, but this does not mean the Government should shy away from its long run objective of supporting private savings through automatic enrolment. Government needs to think carefully about how to square the circle and deliver increased savings alongside economic growth.”

ILC-UK Economic Insight “Autumn Statement 2016: What does it all mean for UK savings?” has been published on the ILC-UK website at www.ilcuk.org.uk

The ILC-UK Economic Insight has been supported by the ILC-UK Partners Programme. Members of ILC-UK Partners Programme include Anchor; Audley; Aviva; Centre for Ageing Better; Equiniti; EY; FirstPort; Hymans Robertson; Legal & General; Newcastle University Institute for Ageing; Partnership; Prudential. 


Ends

Contact: Dave Eaton: Davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk 020 7340 0440

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change. We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.


The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is delighted to announce that Legal & General has agreed to sponsor our website for three years from November 2016.

Kerrigan Procter, Managing Director, Legal & General Retirement said:

'We are delighted to sponsor the International Longevity Centre’s website and support their work as the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change.

One of our society’s greatest achievements is that people are living longer, but ageing populations also bring challenges - from providing pensions to health and social care to housing.

We all share a common interest in finding new solutions to the challenges and indeed the opportunities presented by an ageing population.

At Legal & General we are working with individuals and companies on managing the financial consequences of people living longer. We currently provide income and security to over one million people in retirement and are investing in projects, such as housing, to help build a positive future for everyone. This is a natural partnership for us and one that we are very proud to support'.

Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive added:

“Legal & General are one of ILC-UK’s founding Partners and as such we have worked with them for many years. We are delighted that they have agreed to sponsor our website for three years. This important support will help us continue to deliver our independent analysis of demographic change”

Legal & General, established in 1836, is one of the UK’s leading financial services companies and is responsible for managing £842 billion of assets globally. Legal & General operates one of the largest annuity books in the UK and backs the pension promises it is responsible for keeping with an investment strategy guided by an ambition to play a socially and economically useful role in our wider society and economy.

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

Press Release

Embargoed Wednesday 9th November 00.01

Current pensioners have managed to secure unprecedented leisure time but fail to enjoy the fruits of their labour  


Current pensioners have come close to achieving Keynes’ 80 year old vision of economic bliss – where people are able to capitalise on extended periods of leisure time[1]. But many have fallen short of his ideal because they are unable to remain active and spend their accumulated wealth. Meanwhile, future generations may be forced to work longer hours and experience a sustained reduction in leisure time.

Based on analysis of OECD and Bank of England datasets [2], the findings will be presented by ILC-UK Head of Economics, Ben Franklin, at the ILC-UK’s Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference today.

Those reaching retirement today have benefitted from falling working hours, earlier exits from the labour force and longer life expectancy. New analysis from the ILC-UK shows how this has translated into far fewer working hours over the expected lifetimes of adults retiring today:

  • An average of 23 hours per week for those retiring in the UK today versus 30 hours in 1970.
  • An average of 19 hours per week in France for those retiring today versus 34 hours in 1970.
  • An average of 21 hours per week in Norway for those retiring today versus 30 hours in 1970[3].

Mr Franklin will argue that despite the success in substantially reducing lifetime working hours and increasing leisure time, those in retirement are not necessarily “enjoying the abundance when it comes”.[4] He highlights ILC-UK research which finds that, on average, older people are “underspending”[5], that poor health prevents older people from doing what they want in retirement, and that most leisure time is taken up watching TV and later on, living at home alone.

Yet just as we get accustomed to shorter working weeks, the trend has started to reverse. New analysis of 300 years’ worth of data suggests that the post-World War II period was an economic anomaly characterised by high wage growth, substantial increases in the productivity of labour and in the successful diffusion of productive invention (see chart). Since the year 2000, growth in each of these areas has stalled meaning people have had to work for longer to keep the economy ticking over.

Speaking at the conference, Ben Franklin will say:

“Over eighty years ago, Keynes had a vision that people would work substantially fewer hours and have much more leisure time to use in meaningful ways – to “enjoy the abundance when it comes”. Yet while we reduced the number of working hours across the lifetimes of those retiring today and created extensive periods of adult life outside of the workforce, most leisure time in retirement is spent watching television and, later on, living at home alone. Poor health and disability remain significant barriers to economic bliss in retirement.

Meanwhile, weak economic fundamentals may mean that Keynes’ vision of bliss will slip further from the fingers of those in the workforce today, with slower productivity growth leading to longer hours in work. If, as the data suggests, it turns out that the period 1950-2000 was an economic anomaly rather than the new normal, this will have profound implications for the future leisure opportunities of today’s workers.”


David Sinclair, ILC-UK Director, also speaking at the conference, will set out a positive vision for the Future of Ageing. He will argue that we are at a tipping point where staff shortages, the increasing economic cost of ageing and poor economic fundamentals will force action by policymakers.

Speaking at the conference David Sinclair will say:

“Over the past decade public policy has started to respond to the challenge of ageing. Auto enrolment into pensions has got millions more people saving. We have seen falls in serious illness among older people over the past decade as well as, for example, falls in excess winter deaths. We have seen a growth in age friendly communities as our society slowly adapts to ageing.

We have begun responding to ageing but we are miles from where we need to be. Health and social care funding is inadequate to meet demand, too few people are saving an adequate amount for their retirement and most of us aren’t living as healthily as we should.

But while ageing may seem an impossible challenge for politicians, with political will and action we can ensure the future of ageing is a success rather than a threat to our economy.”


Speaking at the conference, Sinclair highlights 6 “silver bullets” for policy makers to focus effort on, pointing out that achieving change in all these areas is possible with leadership and political will.

The 6 ILC-UK silver bullets

  • Maximising the economic contribution of older people
  • Getting us healthy
  • Maximising the potential of technology and big data
  • Stop patronising old age. Treat adults as adults
  • Start talking about end of life
  • Let’s make ageing fun

Ends

Contact

David Eaton, davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk (07851042609), David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk (07543646992) or Ben Franklin, benfranklin@ilcuk.org.uk (07393325293)

Journalists who would like to attend the Future of Ageing conference should contact ILC-UK asap. Filming and interviews may be arranged with speakers.

Notes:

Copies of the presentation of new analysis by Ben Franklin are available for journalists from Dave Eaton at ILC-UK. They will be published on the ILC-UK Website after the event.

Copies of other presentations on the day will also be made available on the ILC-UK website after the Future of Ageing Conference.

The ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference (http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/) brings together representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society. Speakers at this year’s conference, being held in Westminster, include:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

On Friday 12th February 2016, the ILC-UK published a report based on the information presented at the 2015 Future of Ageing conference, guest blogs written for our Future of Ageing series, and research and analysis from ILC-UK.  The report is available on the ILC-UK website at www.ilcuk.org.uk

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

[1] John Maynard Keynes, The economic possibilities for our grandchildren (1930)

[2] The Bank of England's Three Centuries Macroeconomic Dataset Version 2.3 - 30 June 2016

[3] We used OECD data to estimate likely hours in work as a proportion of total expected adult life. This is total estimated working hours over a lifetime divided by the number of adult years. Adult years is calculated as current life expectancy at the point of retirement minus age of entry in the labour force (we use age 18 for year of entry since time series data on entry is not available for all countries).

[4] John Maynard Keynes, The economic possibilities for our grandchildren (1930)

[5] http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/understanding_retirement_journeys_expectations_vs_reality


Responding to the House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee Report on Intergenerational Fairness, David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK)_said:

We have made huge progress in tackling pensioner poverty over recent decades. It is a major public policy success.

As our society ages we need to adapt our welfare state to ensure its sustainability and long term survival. But whilst it is right to debate cuts to pensioner benefits, we must take care not to throw the baby out with the bathwater.

Within the next decade we are likely to see average pensioner income start to fall. We must ensure that public policy protects the income of tomorrows poorest pensioners, particularly those who won’t have any private savings at all.

This debate cannot be about young versus old. Younger people are tomorrows pensioners. They can look forward to a long and increasingly healthy old age. Younger people will need the support of a welfare state and many will rely on it. Younger people need decent, well paid jobs which help them save for old age.

Government and businesses must focus on ensuring our economy can better support an increasingly older consumer and worker. We must improve workforce productivity and create meaningful employment for all ages. There is a very strong case to invest in education for young and old alike.

Increasing the number of new homes being built will benefit young and old. Government must prioritise housing investment to ensure that older people have places to move to and younger people can get onto the housing ladder.

Ends

Contact: David Eaton on 07531 164886 davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Notes

The House of Commons Work and Pensions Committee report on Intergenerational fairness will be published on 00.01 on Sunday 6th November 2016.
ILC-UK presented oral and written evidence to the committee. ILC-UK also contributed to the Ready for Ageing Alliance evidence submitted to the Committee

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.
We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

Press Release

For Immediate Release 28th October 2016

New analysis shows 60s who join a gym more likely to join a religious group

Think Tank’s longitudinal analysis also found that over 60s who join a political party are also significantly more likely to join a religious group like a church, synagogue or mosque.

Ahead of their annual ‘Future of Ageing’ Conference on Wednesday, 9th November in Central Hall Westminster, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) have conducted new analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and found that over 60s who join a gym or a political party are more like to also join a religious group.

Analysis of ELSA records from 2004-2014 by ILC-UK Research Fellow Dr Cesira Urzi Brancati found that:

  • Over 60s who join a gym are 4% more likely to also join a religious group, even when accounting for the trend in older people becoming more active
  • Over 60s who join a political party are 8% more likely to also join a religious group

The analysis of older people’s behaviour also found that there has been a marked decline in the number of 60-70 year olds belonging to a religious group in the last decade. Since 2002, 65-69 year olds are 7% less likely to claim that they belong to a religious group; 60-64 year olds are 6% less likely to claim that they belong to a religious group.

The ILC-UK also found that belonging to a religious group has a small, but positive impact on 60-70’s sense of worth and happiness:

  • When asked, ‘On a scale from 1 to 10, to what extent do you feel things you do in your life are worthwhile’ 60-64 year olds who are members of a religious group reported an average of 7.9; the average for those not members of a religious group was 7.4
  • For 65-69 year olds, the average response for those in a religious group was 8.2; for the non-religious group, it was 7.6
  • When asked ‘On a scale from 1 to 10, how happy did you feel yesterday’, religious 60-64 year olds on average reported 7.7 whilst the non-religious group average was 7.3
  • For 65-69 year olds, the average response for those in a religious group was 7.9, whilst the non-religious group average was 7.6


As the Church of England considers dropping its legal requirements for weekly Sunday services in light of declining attendance figures,
ILC-UK analysis suggests that outreach programmes by religious groups looking to grow their congregations might best be focused on over 60s who have recently started hitting the gym or campaigning with their local political party (of any affiliation).

The ILC-UK’s annual Future of Ageing Conference will consider how the challenges posed by the UK’s rapidly ageing population will affect health and social care; housing; pensions and personal finance; and wider social issues such as the future of faith in our rapidly ageing society.

Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Officer, ILC-UK said:

Every aspect of our society and economy is affected by our rapidly ageing population. This analysis might suggest that efforts to boost membership across a range of organisations could be best focused on targeting a new generation of over 60s looking to become more active and try something new. Lord Carey, former Archbishop of Canterbury will be delving into the future of faith in an ageing society in more details at the ILC-UK’s annual Future of Ageing Conference this November.


Notes

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is organising its second annual all day conference on The Future of Ageing, on Wednesday, 9th November 2016 at Central Hall, Westminster.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO

Contact

For more information, contact Dave Eaton at ILC-UK on 020 7340 0440 or davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk

ILC-UK are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference. Further support has kindly been received from Action on Hearing Loss, Drink Wise, Age Well, and Lip Reading Practice.

The conference will take place at: Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

To purchase your ticket, please click here to access our 2016 event page.http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/the_future_of_ageing_2016

On Friday 12th February 2016, the ILC-UK published a report based on the information presented at the 2015 Future of Ageing conference, guest blogs written for our Future of Ageing series, and research and analysis from ILC-UK. To download the full report, please click here.

About ILC-UK

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

We also host an annual Future of Ageing Conference to assemble representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society to discuss how the UK can meet the challenges and the opportunities of a rapidly ageing society.

Since our August update, we have launched four new reports, including an analysis of future care sector workforce shortages in the context of Brexit, and a review of financial capability interventions and older people in retirement.

We have also opened bookings for a December event on new approaches to means-testing and funding adult social care, and limited spaces are still available for the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our LinkedIn Group.

 

ILC-UK's Future of Ageing Conference less than one month away

George Sinclair, age 9, explains the urgent need to address the challenges posed by our rapidly ageing society

The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference
Wednesday, 9th November 2016; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

Current confirmed speakers include:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • Dr Maragaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, and
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

For more information and to register to attend, click on the below link
ILC-UK 2016 Future of Ageing Conference

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

Further support has kindly been received from Action on Hearing Loss, lip reading practice and Drink Wise, Age Well.

We have a number of promotional opportunities for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference. For full details, please click here.

We are also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. If you would like to discuss sponsorship and the various packages in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Support the work of the International Longevity Centre - UK

As an independent charity with no core funding, the ILC-UK relies upon the support of our Partners Programme and individual research commissions to operate.

If you would like to support our work producing research and policy analysis and hosting around 50 free-to-attend events a year, you can now donate to the ILC-UK via the secure BT My Donate portal below.

Any support you can provide would be greatly appreciated, and will allow us to continue to address the greatest challenges facing Government and society in the context of our rapidly ageing society and demographic change.

Please click here to donate to the ILC-UK

 

ILC-UK Publications

Brexit and the future of the migrant social care workforce
In this follow up to ILC-UK's 2015 report ‘Moved to Care’, ILC-UK and Independent Age update the analysis of the future workforce shortages in adult social care in England to take account of the EU referendum result of the 23rd June.

Still not ready for ageing
The Ready for Ageing Alliance assess the Government's response to our rapidly ageing society and finds the UK is still not ready.Far from seeing sustained progress over the past few years, society is seemingly going into “reverse gear” in some respects.

What works? A review of the evidence on financial capability interventions and older people in retirement
Commissioned by the Money Advice Service and the UK Financial Capability Strategy, this report carried out an extensive scoping review to establish which financial education programmes designed to improve financial capability amongst older people are effective.

Pension coverage and pension freedoms: Lessons from Hong Kong
This think-piece looks to Hong Kong,  whose pension infrastructure is similar to the one emerging in the UK to examine the potential impact of the UK's recent pension reforms.

 

ILC-UK Events

Costing care: New approaches to means-testing and funding adult social care

Wednesday 14th December; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) - 18:30 (followed by a short drinks reception)
Staple Inn Hall, Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, High Holborn, London WC1V 7QJ

This ILC-UK, IFoA and Cass Business School joint event will launch a new paper which reviews the present and proposed formula for means-testing adult social care in England.

Chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK, the launch will include a keynote presentation from report author, Professor Les Mayhew, Professor of Statistics, Faculty of Actuarial Science and Insurance, Cass Business School, and a response from an expert panel of actuaries and related professionals.

Limited spaces are still available for this event.
Please click here to register for this event

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our August update, we have published analysis on how best to support tomorrow's workforce; addressing the persistence of poverty across Europe; the dilemma faced by central banks, and guest blogs from a variety of expert contributors.

Blogs written by ILC-UK researchers include 'Are immigrants driving down wages in the adult social care sector?', 'Coming soon to a welfare state near you? A universal basic income', and 'Creeping protectionism and population ageing: a lethal combination'. ILC-UK economists Ben Franklin and Dean Hochlaf have also published an ILC-UK Economic Insight report into the challenges facing central banks in the context of the economic 'new normal'.

Our guest blogs have included articles from Audley Chief Executive Nick Sanderson on 'Downsizing and the housing black hole', and from Claire Turner, Interim Director of Evidence at the Centre for Ageing Better on 'Ageing: the things we don't talk about'.

We have also published three guest blogs as part of our 'Future of Ageing' series: researchers from the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation have published on 'Developing and evaluating sustainable services in an ageing society'; Clare Bambra, Professor of Public Health Geography at Durham University has written on how 'Where you live can kill you', and Dr Marianne Coleman, Emeritus Reader in Educational Leadership as written on 'The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society'.

We also regularly publish our Friday Five: five key facts about issues related to ageing.

To read these and all our blogs, please click here.

 

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.


Confirmed speakers include:

  •  John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO


Contact

For more information, contact Dave Eaton at ILC-UK on 020 7340 0440 or davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Notes

ILC-UK are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

The conference will take place at: Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

To purchase your ticket, please click here to access our 2016 event page.

On Friday 12th February 2016, the ILC-UK published a report based on the information presented at the 2015 Future of Ageing conference, guest blogs written for our Future of Ageing series, and research and analysis from ILC-UK. To download the full report, please click here.

About ILC-UK

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

We also host an annual Future of Ageing Conference to assemble representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society to discuss how the UK can meet the challenges and the opportunities of a rapidly ageing society.


A new paper “Still not Ready for Ageing” by the Ready for Ageing Alliance (R4AA), of which the ILC-UK is a member, argues that Government action on tackling the challenges and maximising the opportunities of ageing has stalled.

Click here to download the report.

The ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference will explore many of the issues raised by the Ready for Ageing Alliance.

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference


Confirmed speakers include:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing, Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • The Rt Hon Stephen Dorrell, Chair, NHS Confederation
  • The Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre - UK


If you are interested in sponsorship opportunities at the Future of Ageing conference, click here for further details on the options available, or contact Office and Events Manager Lyndsey Mitchell lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Charities criticise Government’s continued failure to plan for our rapidly ageing society

  • Charities call for an urgent focus on the ‘crisis in social care’ and urge an extended remit for the planned auto-enrolment review.

A group of national charities have criticised the Government’s “incredibly disappointing” progress in planning for our ageing society. 

A new paper “Still not Ready for Ageing” by the Ready for Ageing Alliance (R4AA) argues that Government action on tackling the challenges and maximising the opportunities of ageing has stalled. The charities argue that far from seeing sustained progress over the past few years, society is seemingly going into “reverse gear” in some respects.

In July, the Government published a report – with no fanfare - which it itself commissioned from the Chief Scientist to gather the latest evidence and draw appropriate conclusions on the future of ageing. The Chief Scientist’s report correctly stated that government “will require a co-ordinated response between departments that reflects the robust evidence for the inter-connectedness of policies affected by ageing”.

The Ready for Ageing Alliance argues that we are a long way from achieving this and making the progress we need, pointing out that:

  • Savings levels remain far too low and, without significant increases, future generations of older people will find themselves poorer than today’s pensioners
  • Real wage growth is low, meaning that the incomes of most younger people do not allow them to save more
  • Social Care funding reform has received little discussion since plans for its reform were shelved and the funding gap in social care, which grows by the day, is a disaster for older people today and tomorrow
  • Health and care face major staffing shortages over the short and medium term and unless this reality is properly gripped now we are storing up even bigger problems for the future 
  • Our economy loses billions due to the underemployment of older people who would prefer to keep working but who can’t because of ageism and/or a shortage of flexible working opportunities
  • Isolation and loneliness remain blights on our society, with too little progress in ensuring communities are equipped to help us live independently for longer
  • We have a huge undersupply of retirement housing and new mainstream housing is not meeting the needs of older people today or tomorrow

In terms of pressing public policy issues today the Ready for Ageing Alliance ask for “An urgent focus on the crisis in social care with the aim of achieving a sustainable long term financial settlement which ensures people’s care needs are met”. They also call for the planned review into auto-enrolment to be extended to look broadly at how to increase savings and ensure today’s young people – our future pensioners - can realise an adequate income when they reach later life.

The Ready for Ageing Alliance also calls for:

  • The creation of a permanent commission on Demographic Change which would focus on making progress in responding to our changing society
  • A single point of contact in Government responsible for leading and responding to the challenges and opportunities of ageing set out by the Chief Scientist

David Sinclair of the Ready for Ageing Alliance said:

“The new Prime Minister and her Cabinet have a great opportunity now to set out an agenda to respond to the longer term challenges and opportunities of ageing. The Government must deliver an action plan to respond to the issues highlighted by the Chief Scientist and ensure the report isn’t left to gather dust on the shelf – the issues are far too important for that to happen and affect every single one of us alive today, and future generations too. We also need urgent recognition of the crisis on social care and a plan to fill the funding gap.”

The R4AA members are: Age UK, Alzheimer’s Society, Anchor, Carers UK, Centre for Policy on Ageing, the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK), Independent Age, Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Application deadline - 8am, Monday 12th September

The ILC-UK is an independent, research led, think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and demographic change. Based in the heart of Westminster, much of our work is directed at the highest levels of government in London, Europe and internationally.

We are looking for an organised and proactive Office and Events Coordinator (Maternity Cover) who has experience both coordinating events and office administration. In return, you will gain valuable experience on a range of assignments: from coordinating the preparatory work for a high profile annual event, to independently managing the delivery of events in Europe, the UK and the Houses of Parliament; you will have real responsibility from week one.

You must have excellent communication and writing skills, with a high level of attention to detail. A good awareness of policy and politics would be advantageous. Candidates should have high standards of written and spoken English, and an ability to liaise with the suppliers, funders and general public alike. You should have a good understanding and interest in the work that the ILC-UK undertakes (www.ilcuk.org.uk).

Alongside coordinating our events programme, we are also looking for candidates who can ensure the smooth running of the ILC-UK office, from liaising with equipment suppliers, maintaining office equipment and liaising with the landlord, to monitoring annual leave, ordering stationery and arranging travel/ accommodation for staff.

The role will help to ensure that the office is running smoothly at all times and staff are provided with administrative support. It will ensure ILC-UK’s work reaches its target audience, through events, social media dissemination or engagement with parliamentarians and government. We are small enough for the successful candidate to have a major impact on our work but big enough to attract national media and political attention.

You must have a good knowledge of Microsoft Office programmes (MS Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint). Knowledge of Mailchimp and Eventbrite would also be advantageous. We are looking for someone who has a flexible attitude, who is comfortable working in a small team and who is able to learn quickly and adapt to new tasks with ease.

Personal Specification

  1. Essential: Experience of coordinating events and office administration.
  2. Essential: Good administrative skills.
  3. Essential: Ability to work independently in a highly-pressured environment and to tight deadlines in a small team.
  4. Essential: Strong written and oral communication skills.
  5. Essential: IT literate including Microsoft Office.
  6. Essential: Experience dealing with confidential matters.
  7. Essential: Experience of dealing with credit/debit card payments and petty cash.
  8. Essential: High level attention to detail.
  9. Desirable: Budgeting experience.
  10. Desirable: Worked in the Charity sector.
  11. Desirable: Experience of running events for parliamentarians, civil servants and policy makers.

Send a (maximum) two page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Office and Events Manager at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.

Hours
5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible depending on candidate)

Application deadline
8am, Mon 12th September

Duration of contract
12 months

Interview date
Thurs 22nd September 2016

Salary
£25,000 per annum (pro rata if part-time)

Start date
Tues 01st November 2016

Place of Work
Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Please click on the below link to review the full Job Description for this position.

Documents:

Job Description - Office and events Coordinator (Maternity Cover) (PDF)

Get the free PDF reader


The Rt Hon. Stephen Dorrell, Chair of the NHS Confederation and former Secretary of State for Health and former Chair of the Health Select Committee, and Dwayne Johnson, Director of Adult Social Care, Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council have agreed to join our fantastic list of speakers at the Future of Ageing conference.

Dr Margaret McCartney, GP, author and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, will also present at the conference. Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho of the Department of Ageing and Life Course at the World Health Organisation will also focus on health and care issues, taking a more global perspective.

Conference attendees will also hear from:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • The Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2001

Join as at the Future of Ageing Conference on Wednesday, 9th November. Our Earlybird prices must end on 31st August, so sign up now to take advantage of this special discounted rate.

 

For Immediate Release

In an increasingly complex financial world, responsibility for financial decision-making is progressively being shifted onto the individual. Yet a new report, published by the International Longevity Centre UK, reveals we don’t know enough about how to help people be more financially savvy in their old age.

The end of compulsory annuitisation puts more responsibility on older people to actively manage their retirement income. For some older people, managing money in a digital world poses significant challenges. Others find the challenge of managing debt in old age worrisome. 

A number of studies have found that financial capability, defined as a person’s ability to manage money well, both day to day and through significant life events, is an essential prerequisite for sound financial decision-making. People with higher financial capability save and plan more for retirement, invest in the stock market and hold better differentiated portfolios, they choose cheaper mortgages, shop around for the best financial products and buy cheaper annuities. They are also less likely to be over-indebted and generally feel less anxious about their financial life.

Previous ILC-UK research has shown that of those aged over 55 with a private pension but not yet retired, only half understood what an annuity was “quite or very well”. Income drawdown was even less well understood. ILC-UK research has also revealed that older people have lower levels of numeracy than the young.

Yet, whilst there is a need to increase levels of financial capability among older people, a new review by the International Longevity Centre -UK (ILC-UK) finds that there isn’t enough evidence out there of what actually works.

‘What works? A review of the evidence on financial capability interventions and older people in retirement’ was commissioned by the Money Advice Service on behalf of the UK Financial Capability Strategy. The report carried out an extensive scoping review to establish which financial education programmes designed to improve financial capability amongst older people are effective.

The report examined different financial domains to determine which interventions were most successful in helping older people to manage their money and plan for later life. It found that while users of programmes designed improve money management generally report high levels of satisfaction and feeling more informed a lack of impact evaluation means that there is currently limited evidence of the impact of these programmes on financial behaviour.


Dr Cesira Urzì Brancati, Research Fellow, ILC-UK said:

“The world of money is becoming more complex and older people are more diverse in their experience and needs. Some older people need help understanding how to manage money. Others may need support with investments.

“We need to do all we can to reduce the risk of more older people becoming victims of scams or abuse. Helping people better understand and manage their money has to be part of the solution.

“But while there is a need to raise financial skills across our lives, our research reveals that we simply don’t adequately know how to best help people.”

David Haigh, Director of Financial Capability at the Money Advice Service, said:

“This report highlights how little we know about how best to improve the financial capability of older people.  Whilst there are a number of interventions targeted at older people, there is little reliable and robust evaluation of whether they are truly effective.

“That’s why the Money Advice Service recently announced the launch of the £7m What Works Fund.  This fund is explicitly designed to help organisations carry out a robust evaluation of interventions they are delivering to improve financial capability.  By learning more about what is really effective, we can seek to ensure resources and funding are focussed on interventions that really make a difference.

“Generally, research shows that older people are financially capable. However, they face challenges around low levels of digital literacy and lack of planning for long term care. Discovering what works and targeting effective interventions in these areas will ensure that older people are able to effectively manage their money throughout later life.”

Anna Dixon, Chief Executive of the Centre for Ageing Better, said:

"We know that financial security is an important aspect of a good later life. Building financial capability among older people as well as those approaching retirement is an important part of ensuring that people are able to manage their money in later life.

This report highlights the limited evidence on ‘what works’ to increase financial capabilities among older people in retirement. 12.2 million people are projected to face inadequate retirement incomes.

The Centre for Ageing Better wants more people to feel prepared for later life. We welcome the launch of the £7 million fund by MAS and look forward to the learning which will emerge.”


Notes
The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

Since our June update, we have launched five new reports, including a landmark publication on the future of the UK welfare state; a report on the economic benefits of migration; and our annual factpack, which this year focuses on the state on the nation's housing.

We also extended the early bird rate for the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference to Wednesday, 31st August, and held our second national retirement income summit at the Chartered Insurance Institute.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our LinkedIn Group.


ILC-UK hosts the first Ageing Society pub quiz to launch 'The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack'

On Monday, 18th July ILC-UK hosted the first Ageing Society Pub Quiz to launch 'The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack', supported by FirstPort. Attendees competing across 13 teams tested their knowledge of everything from the issues surrounding an ageing society, to whether the cumulative age of ILC-UK staff was higher or lower than that of the current members of the Rolling Stones.

Thank you to everyone who participated!

 

ILC-UK Publications

The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack
Despite significant increases in the numbers of older people living alone, half of all older people with care needs haven’t made adaptations to their homes to make them easier to live in. Whilst specialist retirement housing can offer more adaptations and play a part in supporting downsizing, the report also finds that the retirement housing supply gap is set to worsen.

Measuring state effectiveness: an ILC-UK index
This technical report presents a new index for measuring State Effectiveness, and comparative performance analysis of countries across Europe. The report warns that 'silver welfare', the strategy of focusing spending on social protection for old age is the only strategy consistently associated with bad outcomes.

Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state
This landmark publication features contributions from more than 20 leading public figures on the reforms necessary to ensure the future of the welfare state. 'Towards a new age' provocatively argues that if governments make policy based purely to get re-elected, the welfare state could become so distorted that it might sow the seeds of its own demise.
A future of the welfare state thinkpiece

Innovate to Alleviate: Exploring how the role of an enhanced care worker could address skills shortages in the social care sector
This report, commissioned by the Department for Health, is the first to examine a newly developed role in the adult social care sector. The first scoping review of its kind, the report is a qualitative investigation compiled from interviews with individuals from all levels of the care home sector.

Immigration: Encourage or deter?
This report demonstrates that migration could boost the UK economy by £625 billion (or 11.4%) by 2064-65. It also finds that migration is likely to support the sustainability of government finances, and that raising the State Pension Age alone will not stabilise the UK's declining dependency ratio.

 

ILC-UK Events

Housing in an Ageing Society
Wednesday 12th October; 10:00 (for a 10:30 start) - 12:30; Legal & General

On Tuesday, 19th July we launched 'The state of the nation's housing', with the support of FirstPort.

This special half day event on Wednesday, 12th October will feature discussion and debate amongst industry experts and Government on the topic of Housing in an Ageing Society.

Speakers include:

  • Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, Newly appointed Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Communities and Local Government;
  • Nigel Wilson, Group Chief Executive, Legal & General
  • Dr Brian Beach, Research Fellow, ILC-UK.

This event is fully subscribed, and is operating a waiting list.
Eventbrite - Housing in an Ageing Society


The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference
Wednesday, 9th November 2016; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

We are pleased to announce that since our June update a further two new keynote speakers have been confirmed for the Future of Ageing 2016. We have also extended our early bird rates until the end of August 2016.

Current confirmed speakers include:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dr Maragaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, and
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

Further support has kindly been received from:

    

 

We have a number of promotional opportunities for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference. For full details, please click here.

We are also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. If you would like to discuss sponsorship and the various packages in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our June update, we have published ILC-UK analysis on the reform of nursing bursaries and the end of Osbornomics, and a variety of blogs from expert guest authors.

Blogs written by ILC-UK researchers include an assessment of reforms of nursing bursaries, lessons from Asia and the rest of the world on maximising the potential of an ageing population, a summary of the Drink Wise, Age Well Inquiry and the end of Osbornomics.

Our guest blogs have included articles on getting young people saving (Michelle McGagh, freelance journalist); on why declining dopamine may explain why older people take fewer risks (Dr Robb Rutledge, Senior Research Associate, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL); and insights into the motivations of young and old voters in the EU referendum (Dr Stuart Fox, Quantitative Research Associate, Wales Institute of Social & Economic Research, Data & Methods).

We have also published guest blogs on combating ageism, fear and loathing in Brexit Britain (Jilly Forster, Founder, Forster Communications) and the difficult conversations people avoid as they get older (Claire Turner, Interim Director of Evidence, Centre for Ageing Better)

We also regularly publish our Friday Five: five key facts about issues related to ageing.

To read these and all our blogs, please click here.

 

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.


ILC-UK 2016 Conference
Wednesday 9th November 2016

ABOUT THE FUTURE OF AGEING CONFERENCE

This 2016 conference is the second in a new series of annual Future of Ageing conferences from the International Longevity Centre – UK. Our first conference sold out and was described by one delegate as ‘one of the best conferences I have ever attended’ . It was held in November 2015 and assembled experts from the fields of health, housing, finance and business to identify the challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing society.

Our 2016 conference aims to delve further into the future of ageing, focussing on:

  • The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society
  • The future of retirement income
  • The future of our economy in an ageing society
  • The future of our built environment in an ageing society
  • The future of ageing research

For more information about our 2015 conference, please visit the 2015 event page here.

To regsiter for our 2016 conference, please visit the 2016 event page here.

WHY YOU SHOULD SPONSOR THIS CONFERENCE

  • We are well known for our events, many of which have to operate a waiting list system as they get fully booked quickly. We were oversubscribed for our 2015 Future of Ageing conference.
  • This will be a unique opportunity to showcase your organisation and product to key decision-makers.
  • You will benefit from the conference publicity to promote your organisation.
  • You will have the opportunity to network with key decision-makers during breaks which will total over two hours.
  • You will benefit from any media coverage before and after the event.
  • You will receive visibility in the press and public affairs campaign to promote the event and the policy findings.
  • You will have the opportunity to shape debates and conversations by engaging in our extensive conference programme. The conference provides an area for stakeholders to meet, learn, discuss and share ideas with their colleagues and professional peers.
  • We will have a limited number of exhibition stands available providing you with great attention from delegates.

BE PART OF THE EVENT
Sponsorship Opportunities

We are offering you the opportunity to sponsor this conference and have four main sponsorship options available to choose from. See below for the packages we are offering. We would, of course, be happy to work with you to create a package that suits your budget and requirements.

To discuss sponsorship and your requirements in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell, Events Manager, on 0207 340 0440 or lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

The Centre for Ageing Better has commissioned International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), along with Newcastle University's Institute for Ageing to conduct a review into inequalities in how people experience later life. The findings will help Ageing Better to ensure its work supports those who are most at risk of missing out on a good later life.

Inequalities in life expectancy, health, psychosocial wellbeing, social connections, financial stability and living environment all vary between different groups and in general increase for the most vulnerable in society.

Ageing Better is dedicated to ensuring that its work has both broad impact but also focusses on those most at risk of missing out on a good later life. The ILC-UK and Newcastle University's Institute for Ageing will therefore scope the evidence on the scale, nature and influences of inequalities in later life. The vital piece of foundational research will help to underpin the design of Ageing Better’s work, enabling better insights into the areas where inequalities are greatest, and also an understanding of what is known about the most promising opportunities to intervene to narrow these disparities.

The causes of inequalities in later life are complex, inter-related, and challenging to eliminate. Current research into the scale, nature and influences of these inequalities is wide-ranging, but is of varied quality and quantity, with few areas studied to the same depth as health and income. ILC-UK will therefore provide a robust review of the available research and data and will draw conclusions about its quality and strength. The submission of the final review will be during February 2017.

ILC-UK and Newcastle University's Institute for Ageing were appointed after responding to the Invitation to Tender issued by Ageing Better in March.

Rachael Docking, Senior Evidence Manager, the Centre for Ageing Better said:

“All our work is rooted in evidence on what matters to people as they prepare for and experience later life. This major review will help us support those who are most at risk of missing out on a good later life. We would like to thank everyone who responded to the Invitation to Tender, and we look forward to working with Newcastle University and ILC-UK.”

Centre for Ageing Better’s Later Life in 2015 study highlighted that there is a wide variation in how people experience later life. Find out more about the different groups of people aged 50 and over here.

  • Growing numbers of 45-64 year olds, and 65-74 year olds are living alone, with 6 million people living in houses with two or more excess bedrooms.
  • Think Tank urges government action on supply whilst also calling for more support to encourage people to adapt their own homes.
  • New analysis for ‘The State of the Nation’s Housing’ projects a shortage of 160,000 retirement housing by 2030.

Despite significant increases in the numbers of older people living alone, half of all older people with care needs haven’t made adaptations to their homes to make it easier to live in, finds the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) in their new “State of the Nation’s Housing” report.

Whilst specialist retirement housing can offer more adaptations and play a part in supporting downsizing, new analysis from the think tank finds that the retirement housing supply gap is set to worsen.

The State of the Nation’s Housing is published today by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), and supported by FirstPort, the UK’s largest residential property manager. The report paints a picture of increased under-occupancy and declining average household size:

  • Since 2005 there has been a significant increase in the number of 45-64 year olds living alone (500,000) as well as the number of 65-74 year olds living alone (300,000).
  • The average household size was 2.9 people in 1971. Today there are on average 2.3 people per household.
  • Over 16 million people – mainly owner occupied, middle aged and older households - live in under-occupied housing. 6 million live in houses with 2 or more excess bedrooms.
  • The 50 to 64 age group has the highest number of people in under-occupied homes (4.5 million), while the 65-79 age group has the highest proportion.
  • Nearly 9 in 10 of the 65-79 age group live in under-occupied housing – over 50% live in homes with two or more excess bedrooms.

But millions of over 50s with care needs haven’t adapted their housing

  • Population ageing is leading to rising care needs, but these needs are not being met. Since 2008-9 the numbers of older people (aged over 65) receiving care has fallen by 30%, while it has fallen by around 26% for those aged 18-64. As a result there are now half a million fewer people receiving care services than there were in 2008-9.
  • In 2012/13, there were 1.86 million people over the age of 50 in England who had unmet needs – an increase of 120,000 people (or 7%) since 2006/7. This means that around 1 in 10 people aged over 50 in England has an unmet care need.
  • Less than half of those over 50s with a limitation in an Activity of Daily Living (ADL) live in homes with any health-related adaptations.

Specialist retirement housing could be a solution for some, but new analysis by the ILC-UK projects a shortage of 160,000 retirement housing by 2030

  • Those in retirement housing are significantly more likely to be living in homes with adaptations than those who do not. Approximately 87% of those in retirement housing have home adaptations, by comparison to around 60% of other housing.
  • The rate of construction of new housing for older people has varied over the years. It peaked in 1989 at 30,000 units but has since fallen back dramatically – averaging around 7,000 new units a year over the last decade.
  • There are around 515,000 specialist retirement and extra care homes in England. However, this means that there is only enough specialist housing to accommodate 5% of the over-65 population.
  • According to our calculations, there could be a retirement housing gap of 160,000 retirement housing by 2030 if current trends continue. By 2050, the gap could grow to 376,000.
  • Among those over 50 who reported having problems with their homes, the most common noise (around 25%) and being too cold in the winter (around 20%).

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK said:

‘Our report highlights that there are millions of over 50s with care needs who haven’t adapted their housing for old age and may be in homes too big for them.

Retirement housing could be a solution for some older people but we are building far too few of this type of housing.

Government must ensure that planning better supports and encourages adaptations. If older people are to live longer in their own homes we must better support older people to make adaptations to allow them to continue to live independently their own homes. A freeze in the current rate of stamp duty might also encourage more over 50s to move to homes better suited to their current, and future needs’.

Nigel Howell, Chief Executive, FirstPort, said:

“As an industry, we need to make downsizing work better in order to reduce under-occupancy and ensure people are living in properties suited to their needs. Perhaps there needs to be a more flexible model than we have traditionally seen in the UK where home-ownership is seen as the ultimate aim for many. With today's varied lifestyles, apartment living can be a very attractive home option at any age, whether owned or rented. One beauty of apartment living for older customers is the combination of having your own home yet with the social infrastructure that comes with an apartment lifestyle.

We aim to continue working with partners in the property sector to drive forward these issues and present possible incentives and solutions so people can live in the properties that suit their lifestyle. Alongside this, we will help to inform the debate to ensure that we do not forget the real people behind these issues.”

To produce The State of the Nation’s Housing, ILC-UK has analysed data available through wave 7 of the The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and data from the English Housing Survey. The report also incorporates analysis of other official data sets including those produced by ONS and Government Departments.

Contact

Dave Eaton at ILC-UK davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk 02073400440 or 07531164886

Louise Fernley – Pagefield for FirstPort – at louise.fernley@pagefield.co.uk 0203 327 4062

Notes to Editors

Full references are available in The State of the Nation’s Housing. To produce The State of the Nation’s Housing, ILC-UK has analysed data available through wave 7 of the The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and data from the English Housing Survey. The report also incorporates analysis of other official data sets including those produced by ONS and Government Departments.

The State of the Nation’s Housing will be published on the ILC-UK website on 19th July 2016. Click here to download the report.

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

About FirstPort
With over 30 years’ experience, FirstPort is the largest residential property manager and the leading retirement property management company in the UK.

It has c.115,000 general leasehold residential properties under management across c.2,150 developments and c.56,000 specialist retirement properties across c.1,400 developments in England. It manages c.3,300 retirement properties and c.7,400 general residential properties (approximately 130 developments) in Scotland.

The company also has a specialist team dedicated to looking after large and complex developments and manages some of the most prestigious residential sites in the UK including management of Build to Rent developments in the Private Rented Sector (PRS).

A new Index on the effectiveness of different welfare states by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) ranks European countries based on their performance in a number of key welfare areas between 2003-2014. ‘Measuring state effectiveness: an ILC-UK index’ found that:

  • With approximately 15 million people classified by Eurostat as at ‘risk of poverty or social exclusion (AROPE)’, the UK is ranked 15th of 23 European countries on the ILC-UK’s Poverty and Social Exclusion Index.
  • The UK is ranked 14th on the ILC-UK’s Housing Quality Index, mainly due to its relatively high levels of housing cost overburden among the young and the working age population.
  • In terms of overall State Effectiveness, the UK is average: 11th out of 23 European countries.

Poverty and social exclusion

The Poverty and Social Exclusion Index includes indicators of the number of households earning less than 60% of the median income; of the proportion of those aged 18-29 not in employment, education or training; and pensioner wellbeing.

The UK fares worse than average in 23 EU countries, but especially so in terms of old age people at risk of poverty and social exclusion – though poverty and social exclusion remains highest amongst 18-24 year olds.

Housing quality

The Housing Quality Index is calculated on the basis of housing affordability; housing overcrowding rate, by age group; housing deprivation (e.g. leaking roof, damp walls, etc) and the proportion of homeowners (with or without outstanding mortgage), amongst other measures.

The UK is ranked 14th for housing quality, and the UK has one of the highest rates of housing cost overburden, followed only by Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and Greece. 18-24 year olds face particularly heavy cost burdens relative to other age groups.

Given that the UK is ranked 15th for poverty and social exclusion; 14th for housing quality; 9th for health of the population; 9th for access to education; and 5th for intergenerational fairness, the UK is ultimately ranked a distinctly average 11th overall for state effectiveness

‘Measuring state effectiveness: an ILC-UK index’ urges the UK to learn from the welfare strategies of higher ranked countries, such as focusing on social protection for families, higher participation of older women in the labour force, and investing in substantial health expenditure.

It warns that ‘silver welfare’, the strategy of focusing spending on social protection for old age is the only strategy consistently associated with bad outcomes.

Dr Cesira Urzì Brancati, Research Fellow, ILC-UK said:

‘Given that the UK is currently the 5th largest economy in the world, we might expect it to rank higher than 15th in Europe for social protection spending, and expect it to allocate spending more evenly across the lifecycle.

As the UK’s population is ageing rapidly, future governments need a coherent strategy to deliver a welfare state which guarantees the best possible provision for the largest number of people across the UK.

This strategy cannot be based on what is politically expedient; instead, future governments must base these judgements on evidence. Looking at approaches to social security, health, housing and education across Europe to identify successful strategies is a good place to start, particularly in times of such uncertainty’.

Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) on 020 7340 0440, or 07531 164 886.

Notes

‘Measuring state effectiveness: an ILC-UK index’ is the accompanying technical report to 'Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state'.

Authors who have contributed to the book include:

Professor Nicholas Barr; Professor Elsa Fornero; Sir Anthony Seldon; Sir Michael Lyons; Professor Danny Blanchflower; Professor David Bell; Professor Danny Dorling; Professor Phil Hope; George Magnus; Professor Chris Husbands; Lord Richard Best; John Philpott; Ben Franklin; Dr. Cesira Urzi Brancati; Lord David Willetts; Norma Cohen; Steve Webb; Gregg McClymont; Dr Andy Tarrant; Sally-Marie Bamford; Kieran Brett; Caroline Green; Neal Hudson; Nusrat Ghani MP

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.


‘Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state’
argues that governments are ‘sowing the seeds of the welfare state’s demise’ by failing to reform a welfare system increasingly distorted towards propping up spending on older people, at the expense of the working age population.

The book, published by the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK), contains 20 essays outlining the challenges and reforms necessary on housing, health, education, the labour market, and pensions and welfare. Contributors include (amongst others):

  • Former Italian Labour Minster Professor Elsa Fornero
  • Former longest serving UK Pensions Minister Steve Webb
  • Former UK Minister for Science and Universities Lord Willetts
  • Sir Michael Lyons, author of the Lyons Housing Review
  • Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor, University of Buckingham
  • Nusrat Ghani MP, Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Ageing

Based on new analysis, the ILC-UK argues that population ageing could make democracy and the welfare state incompatible:

  • An increasing share of public expenditure on older people at the expense of investing in younger generations will undermine the affordability of the welfare system and the wellbeing of the population as a whole.
  • But since the UK has a growing and powerful older voting block, the chances of aligning effective social policy reform with broad-based political support is likely to fall over time.
  • Unless we get to grips now, enforced and painful retrenchment may be needed at a later date to secure affordability.

The ILC-UK point to evidence from their new Welfare State Effectiveness Index which shows that countries with welfare systems geared towards higher spending on older people at the expense of younger generations have the lowest levels of wellbeing. They perform worst in terms of: poverty, access to education, housing quality and intergenerational fairness.

Worryingly, new analysis from chapter authors Professor David Bell and Professor David Blanchflower demonstrates that millennials may be less inclined, and less able to support the continued existence of the welfare state.

  • Using the ‘welfarism scale’, i.e. attitudes to welfare collected from the British Social Attitudes Survey, they found attitudes to the welfare state are markedly less sympathetic for under-35s.
  • Higher levels of youth unemployment, underemployment, temporary job holding and self-employment have weakened millennials’ ability to contribute to the welfare state.
  • The authors argue for a major reorientation of policy towards youth employment and skill enhancement to ensure millennials are able and inclined to support older generations.

The book concludes by arguing that we need a new Beveridge that takes into account demographic shifts in a way that is fair across generations. But in order to define what a new social contract could look like, we first need a wide-ranging, national debate incorporating the views of different groups. The book finishes by setting out the key principles for kick-starting such a process.

Andrew Rear, Chief Executive, Munich Re UK said:

‘At this pivotal moment in our history, the UK needs to think through what kind of society we want to be, and build positively towards that, instead of drifting on a sea of soundbites towards fracture and uncertainty’.

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing, ILC-UK said:

“Reform of the welfare state to ensure its future sustainability is not simply about pulling back the state. A reconfiguration of the state is what’s needed with retrenchment in some areas and expansion in others. Yet if governments make policy based purely to get re-elected, the welfare state could become so distorted that it might sow the seeds of its own demise.

To move forward, we, as a society, must better understand the long term consequences of ageing. It is quite possible that by having an open and honest national debate about the possible economic and social consequences, public opinions could be reshaped and political preferences challenged. This is not just relevant for the UK. The rest of the world is ageing too and at a significant rate. This is the future, it will shape us all profoundly, and we must adapt in order to make the most of it.” 

The book and new analysis by ILC-UK has been produced with the support of Munich Re.

Authors who have contributed to the book include:

Professor Nicholas Barr; Professor Elsa Fornero; Sir Anthony Seldon; Sir Michael Lyons; Professor Danny Blanchflower; Professor David Bell; Professor Danny Dorling; Professor Phil Hope; George Magnus; Professor Chris Husbands; Lord Richard Best; John Philpott; Ben Franklin; Dr. Cesira Urzi Brancati; Lord David Willetts; Norma Cohen; Steve Webb; Gregg McClymont; Dr Andy Tarrant; Sally-Marie Bamford; Kieran Brett; Caroline Green; Neal Hudson; Nusrat Ghani MP


Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) on 020 7340 0440, or 07531 164 886.

Notes to Editors

Individual essays may be appropriate for “op ed” opportunities.

'Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state'

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

 


The think piece, published as part of ILC-UK’s “future of the state” project, argues that building and sustaining enough housebuilding to meet our chronic undersupply requires action on all levels, not just focused on younger people.

Sir Michael Lyons and colleagues argue that whilst the Government’s focus on ‘first time buyers’ is understandable, “we might make faster progress in helping these younger generations if we devote as much of our energies to meeting the housing needs and aspirations of their parents and grandparents.”

In the think piece, the authors urges

  • More council commissioning of housing
  • A wider range of commissioners of new house building
  • A better rental offer for older people with secure tenancies
  • More shared ownership options for older people
  • Greater choice for older people in general needs housing

The authors argue that the lack of new housing supply has contributed to the rampant increase in house prices in recent decades . This in turn has resulted in housing wealth becoming the principal driver of inequality in the UK. The think piece points out that “providing a better choice of options for older people looking to downsize would unlock substantial equity that could be made available to invest in new homes whilst releasing existing family homes into the market”.

Launching the think piece, Sir Michael Lyons said:

“Finding ways in which local authorities can promote, support, finance and commission new homes will be critical to achieve the Government’s housebuilding targets and in ensuring greater commissioning of homes suitable for older people.

We need a better rental offer with secure tenancies and confidence of rent stability to encourage older home owners looking to release capital to provide an income in later years and to help fund housing for their children and grandchildren.

The increased opportunities for self build, of self commissioning that government is promoting could be an attractive option for those who have equity but feel there is a lack of choice to meet their aspirations or those for whom retirement settings do not appeal”. 

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing at ILC-UK added:

“Supporting our current and future housing needs must be a key pillar of a new social contract between the state and the individual. For more than a decade we have simply not been building sufficient homes to meet demand. This is having a detrimental impact on the livelihoods and wellbeing of people across all ages.

“Unfortunately this is not going to change any time soon unless we make some radical changes to the system. The UK’s population is growing and is ageing which will only exacerbate the current crisis. In this context, supporting the housing needs of older people can be one important component of a strategy to revitalise the nation’s housing.”

Notes to Editors

The think piece is an extended version of a chapter of 'Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state'. Please click here to download the book in full.

The book, and accompanying technical report (please click here to download the technical report) explores how the welfare state in the UK needs to adapt to cope with demographic change. Authors of essays in the book include:

Professor Nicholas Barr; Professor Elsa Fornero; Anthony Seldon; Sir Michael Lyons; Professor Danny Blanchflower; Professor David Bell; Professor Danny Dorling; Phil Hope; George Magnus; Professor Chris Husbands; Lord Richard Best; John Philpott; Ben Franklin; Dr. Cesira Urzi Brancati; Lord David Willetts; Norma Cohen; Steve Webb; Gregg McClymont;  Andy Tarrant; Sally-Marie Bamford; Kieran Brett; Caroline Green; Neal Hudson; Nusrat Ghani MP

The Think Piece ‘How a greater focus on ‘last time buyers’ and meeting the housing needs of older people can help solve the housing crisis” has been written for ILC-UK by Sir Michael Lyons, Caroline Green and Neal Hudson. Please click here to read the piece in full.

Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state was supported by Munich Re.

ILC-UK is delighted to announce that FirstPort has joined our Partners Programme. The partnership will see FirstPort support ILC-UK events and research over the next year.

FirstPort will join forces with the ILC-UK to deepen and contribute to understanding of the retirement sector. FirstPort currently has over 1,500 retirement properties under its management and will build on this experience through access to the ILC-UK’s world-leading research and expertise into the challenges and opportunities of housing in an ageing society. In early July FirstPort is supporting ILC-UK at the launch of a ‘fact-pack’ looking at the issue of accommodation for older people.

Commenting on the new partnership, Nigel Howell, FirstPort’s CEO said:

“As a world-respected authority on older populations and demographic change, I can think of no better partner than ILC-UK to help FirstPort explore the theme of housing in an ageing society. We look forward to gaining a fresh perspective and new insights from ILC-UK into longevity and ageing. 

FirstPort has a long history in the retirement property sector and this partnership will help us continue to deliver for residents, both in our retirement developments and more broadly. We have already adopted the Barclay’s Digtal Eagles programme to help residents navigate the online world. This new partnership will help us better understand the challenges and opportunities that our residents face and ensure we continue to provide relevant services of the highest standards now and into the future.”

Baroness Greengross, CEO of the International Longevity Centre, said:

“It’s great to add FirstPort’s support to our Partners Programme. We help our partners make sense of and plan for changing societal trends. Our work can aid understanding through the latest available research and data on ageing and longevity from in the UK, EU and the rest of the world.

We have an exciting programme of events and research planned and we look forward to working with FirstPort over the next year.”

Can the UK welfare state cope with ageing?

  • New analysis and book will explore whether the UK welfare state can cope with an ageing society
  • Chapter authors include Professor Nicholas Barr; Professor Elsa Fornero; Anthony Seldon; Sir Michael Lyons; Professor David Blanchflower; Professor David Bell; Professor Danny Dorling; Phil Hope; George Magnus; Professor Chris Husbands; Lord Richard Best; John Philpott;  Lord David Willetts;  Steve Webb; Gregg McClymont; Nusrat Ghani MP


On 1st July, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) will publish a new book (Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state) which will explore two of the biggest questions of our time:

  • How might population ageing impact on the UK welfare state?
  • What reforms to the welfare state might be necessary to ensure long run sustainability and maximise wellbeing?

The book explores how different aspects of our welfare state will need to reform in order to adapt to ageing. In particular, the book explores:

  • Reforming the pension system
  • The labour market and welfare reform
  • Reforming education
  • Health reform
  • Housing reform

Demographic change is deemed to pose a risk to the welfare state by reducing the number of workers relative to the number of non-workers thereby implying either increased tax burdens on the working population or a reduction in welfare spending per head.

But is such a future inevitable? And what needs to be done to ensure the survival of the welfare state in the context of our ageing population?

ILC-UK has invited a number of experts across different fields to assess the challenges posed by ageing for the UK welfare state as well as the possible solutions.

The book includes ILC-UK’s own analysis of how the UK welfare state ranks in terms of effectiveness when compared to other developed countries.

Authors who have contributed to the book include:

Professor Nicholas Barr; Professor Elsa Fornero; Anthony Seldon; Sir Michael Lyons; Professor Danny Blanchflower; Professor David Bell; Professor Danny Dorling; Phil Hope; George Magnus; Professor Chris Husbands; Lord Richard Best; John Philpott; Ben Franklin; Dr. Cesira Urzi Brancati; Lord David Willetts; Norma Cohen; Steve Webb; Gregg McClymont;  Andy Tarrant; Sally-Marie Bamford; Kieran Brett; Caroline Green; Neal Hudson; Nusrat Ghani MP

The book and new analysis by ILC-UK has been produced with the support of Munich Re.

Book Contents

Foreword, Baroness Sally Greengross

Biographies; Acknowledgements; Introduction

Part 1. Background and context

  • Towards a dystopian future? Population ageing, democracy and the welfare state - Ben Franklin
  • Distinctly average? The UK welfare state in context - Cesira Urzi Brancati
  •  

Part 2. How population ageing is challenging the role of the state

  • Can we afford the welfare state? - Nicholas Barr
  • We need a new welfare model for the age of ageing - George Magnus
  • What the welfare state is for - David Willetts
  • Towards economic stagnation? How falling fertility is leading to sterile economies - Norma Cohen

Part 3. Developing coping mechanisms in the face
of population change



Reforming the pension system

  • Economic-financial literacy for sustainable welfare reforms - Elsa Fornero
  • What sorts of pensions and savings delivery models are likely to be viable and fair across generations? - Steve Webb
  • Avoiding lemons: The UK workplace pensions challenge - Gregg McClymont and Andy Tarrant

The labour market and welfare reform

  • The welfare state and the young - David Bell and David Blanchflower
  • Alternative routes to full employment in a flexible labour market: Should welfare reform be tough, progressive, or radical? - John Philpott

Reforming education

  • The individual and the social: making education matter for all of us - Chris Husbands
  • Education in the twenty-first century - Anthony Seldon

Health reform

  • Rethinking health care and taxing assets to fund social care - Phil Hope
  • A tale of two health systems - Sally-Marie Bamford and Kieran Brett

Housing reform

  • How a greater focus on ‘last time buyers’ and meeting the housing needs of older people can help solve the housing crisis - Michael Lyons, Caroline Green and Neal Hudson
  • Housing our ageing population: The role of the state - Richard Best
  • In defence of the welfare state and the role of active housing policy - Danny Dorling

Building a consensus on the way forward

  • Overcoming political short-termism: How can we deliver a new long term social contract in the context of population ageing? - Nusrat Ghani MP
  • Conclusion: Towards some principles for reform - Ben Franklin


 

20th June 2016

Press Release

New analysis shows that higher migration would boost the UK economy by £625 billion and that areas with higher employment for non-UK citizens also have higher employment rates for white UK-born citizens


A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) demonstrates that reducing migration could boost the economy by £625 billion (or 11.4% bigger) by 2064-65.

New analysis of Local Authority data also found that fears that migrants from the European Economic Area (EEA) are crowding some British citizens out of the labour market are unfounded, as on average those local authorities with higher levels of employment amongst non-UK born citizens also have higher employment rates for the white UK born population.

The report, ‘Immigration: Encourage or Deter?’ describes the challenges posed by the UK’s rapidly ageing population

  • Between 2000 and 2050 the number of over 65s is expected to double, while the working age population (20-64 years) will only increase by 20.1%
  • The number of over 85s is expected to more than quadruple between 2000-2050
  • Between 1950 and 2013, the number of working age people for every person over 65 has fallen from 5.5 to 3. This is expected to fall further to 2.2 by 2050 [1]

As the UK’s dependency ratio (the number of people of working age (20-64 years) for each person over 65) declines, tax revenues will fall and public debt as a proportion of GDP will rise. Increased demand for the State Pension and health and social care services from our rapidly ageing population also impact the sustainability of public debt.

The report also notes that while the UK Government has committed itself to raising the State Pension Age beyond 65, this will not stabilise the UK’s declining dependency ratio.

Instead, the report argues that migration could help mitigate the spending pressures a rapidly ageing population create. The report notes that:

  • Non-UK nationals living in the UK are more likely to be of working age than UK nationals. 76.5% of nationals from the EEA are between the ages of 15-64, while only 63.3% of British nationals are between the ages 15-64
  • EU citizens in the UK are more likely to be in employment than UK citizens. In 2015, the employment rate for EU citizens in the UK was 82%. For UK citizens in was 77%
  • Between 2001-2011, migrants from the EEA put in £22.1 billion more in taxes than they took from the state[2]..

New analysis from the ILC-UK shows that if the UK experiences a ‘high migration scenario’ [2] between 2016 – 2064-65, GDP will be 11.4% higher (the equivalent of £625 billion) than if the UK experiences a ‘low migration scenario’. By 2030, the economy could be £71bn bigger (2.9%) and by 2050, £324bn bigger (8.2%).

Migration is also likely to support the sustainability of government finances: under the ‘high migration scenario’ public debt as a proportion of GDP is expected to stand at 70% by 2064-65. Under a ‘low migration scenario’, public debt is set to rise to 104% of GDP.

In response to concerns that increased migration might crowd some UK citizens out of the labour market, the report features new analysis of local authority data which found that, on average, those Local Authorities with higher employment rates for the Non-UK born population also have higher employment rates for the white UK born population (see figures below – each dot represents a local authority).

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing at the ILC-UK said:

“Immigration is no silver bullet. The UK’s ageing population is a dramatic shift that will require a myriad of policies to help achieve desirable outcomes. However, we must recognise the benefits of immigration as a means of coping with the challenge. Migrants are typically of working age, in employment and make a net positive contribution to government finances by contributing more in tax than taking out in benefits”.

“Whether we remain in the EU or not, the UK will have to accept that migrants will play a large role in the future of the labour market, as it does in most other developed economies. As long as the UK has a strong and growing economy, more people will want to come to the UK than to leave it. Since migration helps to support growth and the sustainability of public finances as our society ages, we need not fear it.”


References

1. Historical population data and projections, 1950-2050, OECD http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DatasetCode=POP_FIVE_HIST

2. Dustmann and Frattini (2014) The fiscal effects of immigration to the UK, The Economic Journal3. As defined in the Office for Budget Responsibility’s 2015 Fiscal Sustainability Report, http://budgetresponsibility.org.uk/docs/dlm_uploads/49753_OBR-Fiscal-Report-Web-Accessible.pdf

Contact

Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) on 020 7340 0440, or 07531 164 886.

Notes

The OBR’s migration assumptions are consistent with the Office for National Statistics Population Projections. In the high migration scearnio net migration reaches 225,000 per annum, in the central scenario it reaches 165,000 per annum and in the low scenario it reaches 105,000.

‘Immigration: Encourage or Deter?’ has been published on the ILC-UK website at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.
 

Press Release

High numeracy in old age correlated with higher savings, better care planning, and even with more sex!

Think tank argues urgent need to better understand “what works” in terms of improving financial outcomes for older people. ILC-UK question whether we have adequate evidence that financial education makes a difference in old age.


New analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) by the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC-UK) reveals

  • Only 1 in 4 English people aged 50+ can perform a simple compound interest calculation (1 in 3 men and 1 in 6 women)
  • Greater numeracy is associated with higher saving levels and better planning for care
  • Surprisingly and perplexingly, older people who have good numeracy, tend to have sex more often than those who don’t.

Presenting new evidence at the ILC-UK National Retirement Income Summit today, ILC-UK Research Fellow, Dr Cesira Urzi Brancati will argue that whilst there is strong evidence of a link between good numeracy and good financial outcomes, the evidence of what works in terms of improving financial literacy is limited. 

With greater responsibility for financial wellbeing in retirement being placed on individuals, Dr Urzi Brancati will argue that urgent action is needed to better understand how financial capability links to good outcomes. Dr Urzi Brancati will add that the financial wellbeing of older people is being potentially undermined by poor numeracy.

ILC-UK analysis of ELSA questions highlight the challenge of poor numeracy in old age

If the chance of getting a disease is 10 percent, how many people out of 1,000 (one thousand) would be expected to get the disease? 1 in 10 older men and 1 in 5 women got this wrong

A second hand car dealer is selling a car for £6,000. This is two-thirds of what it cost new. How much did the car cost new? 68% of older men and about half the women got this right

If 5 people all have the winning numbers in the lottery and the prize is £2 million, how much will each of them get? 69% of older men and only 45% of women got this right


ILC-UK analysis reveals that average household savings increase with numeracy, as does the extent to which an individual had planned for long term care. Other literature finds that greater numeracy is correlated with better outcomes on many financial domains including financial management; shopping around; planning for retirement; investment; debt.

 


 




But during the presentation, Dr Urzi Brancati will point out that the correlation may not be causal and that we need to much better understand the relationship between numeracy and good outcomes. Dr Urzi Brancati highlights this by pointing out that there is even seemingly a correlation between good numeracy and whether an an older person has had sex in the last year.



Speaking at the Retirement Income Summit, Dr Cesira Urzi Brancati said

“Increasingly, responsibility for our financial wellbeing in retirement is being placed on individuals rather than the state. Yet we believe that potentially many millions of people are ill--equipped to make the best financial decisions.

It is clear that good numeracy appears to be correlated with good financial outcomes. But in fact, the impact of measured financial capability on financial behaviours is ambiguous. Perhaps some people save more and can give more correct answers simply because they are smarter. And perhaps people have saved more or invested better and therefore have learnt the working of compound interest, rather than the opposite.

Even if we were absolutely convinced that you can “teach” financial capability, it isn’t clear we have adequate evidence as to what actually works for older people.

We very much welcome the recently announced investment by the Money Advice Service to help us better understand more about how to improve financial capability.''

Dr Cesira Urzi Brancati was speaking at the ILC-UK National Retirement Income Summit, attended by 160 industry and consumer experts in London today. 

The ILC-UK’s Second Retirement Income Summit was announced 10 years on from the Pensions Commission. The Pensions Commission painted a future where individuals would need to do a combination of working longer, saving more, or paying more tax. The Commission argued that a failure to act would lead to poorer pensioners.

In April this year, ILC-UK argued that whilst progress has been made since 2006, there is much to do. The analysis (http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/news/news_posts/press_release_think_tank_urges_government_to_introduce_a_new_cross_party_pe) revealed that:

  • The average age of exit from the labour force is increasing but it is still below what it was in the 1960s and 1970s
  • In fact, the average time spent in retirement continues to increase
  • Auto-enrolment has delivered a growing number of employees with workplace pensions
  • But median contribution rates are low and a growing proportion of us have no savings. Final Salary pension coverage continues to fall
  • Younger people are less well placed than previous generations to save and may attract lower long term returns on their savings
  • Effective tax rates have been falling but have increased more recently
  • Spending on pensioner benefits are slightly above the long run average as a percentage of GDP

ILC-UK’s Retirement Income Summit is being hosted by the Chartered Insurance Institute on 10th June 2016. Other speakers at the event include: Ben Franklin (ILC-UK); Baroness Jeanie Drake; Steve Webb (Royal London); Gregg McClymont (Aberdeen Asset Management); Professor David Blake (Cass); Chip Castille (Blackrock); and Michelle Cracknell (TPAS).

Ends

Notes

ILC-UK analysis, has been drawn from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a survey of people aged 50+ living in private households in England. Beginning with interviews in 2002 on a nationally-representative sample derived from the Health Survey of England, ELSA has since gathered an extensive range of health and socioeconomic information from respondents every two years.

The data were made available through the UK Data Archive. ELSA was developed by a team of researchers based at the NatCen Social Research, University College London and the Institute for Fiscal Studies. The data were collected by NatCen Social Research. The funding is provided by the National Institute of Aging in the United States, and a consortium of UK government departments co-ordinated by the Office for National Statistics. The developers and funders of ELSA and the Archive do not bear any responsibility for the analyses or interpretations presented here.

Contact
David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk 07543646992) or David Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk on 07531164886)

Since our April update, we have published two new reports; hosted three oral evidence sessions for the Drink Wise, Age Well Inquiry; hosted roundtable discussions in London and Brussels on lessons for Europe's growth strategy from East Asia and the rest of the world; and announced three new keynote speakers for our 2016 Future of Ageing conference.

On Monday, 18th April, we also hosted a roundtable discussion with the Pensions Minister, Baroness Altmann, and members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme to discuss the reality of retirement journeys and innovations in the retirement income market.


Call for written evidence: the relationship between alcohol-related harm and employment in the over 50s

The Drink Wise Age Well partnership of leading national alcohol and ageing charities have launched an Inquiry, led by the ILC-UK into alcohol-related harm amongst the over 50s.

Each year we will hold an Inquiry on a key theme pertaining to alcohol and the over 50s and for 2016, we aim to explore and consider employment.

The 2016 Inquiry is focusing on three key areas: alcohol and over 50s seeking employment; alcohol and over 50s currently in employment; and alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement.

We are inviting submissions of written evidence for one, two or all of the three key areas; the deadline for submissions is Friday, 1st July 2016.

For more information on how to submit written evidence to the Inquiry, please click here.


ILC-UK report sparks debate on adult lifespan inequalities

'An Investigation into Inequalities in adult lifespan', a new report from the ILC-UK and Cass Business School, received wide media coverage when it was published on Tuesday, 3rd May.

Co-author Professor Les Mayhew was interviewed on BBC Radio 4's flagship The Today Programme, and the report was covered by BBC News, The Daily Mail, The Express and The Mirror, attracting hundreds of comments and just under two million Twitter impressions.


ILC-UK Publications


Dementia and Comorbidities: Ensuring Parity of Care

This report demonstrates that a failure to prevent, diagnose, and treat depression, diabetes and urinary tract infections in people with dementia could be costing the UK’s health and social care system up to nearly £1 billion per year.

An Investigation into Inequalities in adult lifespan

Despite huge increases in life expectancy, the gap between rich and poor is increasing for the first time since the 1870s, according to this new report from Cass Business School, City University London and the ILC-UK.


ILC-UK Events

Second National Retirement Income Summit
Friday 10th June 2016; 09:15 - 16:30 (followed by a short drinks reception)

On Friday, 10th June 2016, ILC-UK will be holding our second Retirement Income Summit, hosted by The Chartered Insurance Institute.

With the end of compulsory annuitisation, navigating the retirement income maze will require great information, advice and financial capability. With these challenges in mind, the Retirement Income Summit will convene expert speakers and host panel debates on how best to negotiate the future of retirement income.

For more information, including a full agenda, please click here.

The Summit is now fully booked. To join the waiting list, please click here.


The Future of the UK Welfare State

Thursday, 30th June 2016; House of Lords

We are delighted to be holding the launch of a provocative new exploration of public service provision, the welfare state and democratic governance in the 21st century.

'The Future of the UK Welfare State', our new landmark publication, supported by Munich Re, will be launched at the event. To mark the launch we are inviting parliamentarians, policy makers, academics and members of the press to the House of Lords to hear some of our contributors provide a brief outline of their essays.

For more information and to register for this event, please click here.


Innovate to Alleviate: Exploring How the Role of an Enhanced Care Worker Could Address Skills Shortages in the Social Care Sector

Monday, 4th July; House of Lords

'Innovate to Alleviate: Exploring How the Role of an Enhanced Care Worker Could Address Skills Shortages in the Social Care Sector' constitutes the first qualitative investigation of an emerging role within the adult social care sector: the 'Enhanced Care Worker', where care workers are trained to undertake clinical tasks traditionally done by nurses.

We are inviting parliamentarians, industry leaders, academics and care worker representatives to discuss the challenges and opportunities this new role presents.

For more information, please click here.

This is an invitation only event.


The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference

Wednesday, 9th November 2016; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's
Gate, London, SW1H 9NH


We are pleased to announce that since our April update two new keynote speakers have been confirmed for the Future of Ageing 2016.

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review; - Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP, and
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority will be joining:
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • George Magnus, Economist and Author of The Age of Aging (2008), and
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health

We are also delighted that McCarthy & Stone and Action on Hearing Loss will be sponsoring the conference.

Register for the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference Here

We have a number of promotional opportunities for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference. For full details, please click here.

We are also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. If you would like to discuss sponsorship and the various packages in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.


ILC-UK Blogs

Since our April update, we have published a summary of our press highlights from April and May, 'ILC-UK in the news - April and May 2016', including links to stories featuring ILC-UK research.

We have published two blogs by researchers at WISERD (Wales Institute of Social & Economic Research, Data & Methods) on the upcoming EU Referendum: 'The Young, the Old and the Referendum', and 'Are Older Voters Swinging Behind Remain?'.

Guest contributors have also included Rebecca Deegan, Policy Analyst at the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (IFoA), writing on public attitudes to the pension freedoms one year on from the reforms; Douglas Anderson, Founder of Club Vita on why people underestimate their longevity; and Rachael Docking, Senior Evidence Manager at the Centre for Ageing Better on managing major life changes.

We also regularly publish our Friday Five: five key facts about issues related to ageing.

To read these and all our blogs, please click here.

FirstPort, EY, the Centre for Ageing Better and Newcastle University's Institute for Ageing join the ILC-UK Partners Programme

We are delighted to announce that FirstPort, EY, the Centre for Ageing Better and Newcastle University's Institute for Ageing have joined the ILC-UK Partners Programme.


PARTNERS PROGRAMME

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.


Working with ILC-UK

RESEARCH AND EVENTS

Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS

If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

Research from Cass Business School and the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) has found growing inequalities in adult life expectancy.

Based on data from the Human Mortality Database, Professor of Statistics Les Mayhew and Dr David Smith measured the differences in age between the earliest 10% of adult deaths and the top 5% of survivors.

They found that while people in the UK are living longer than ever, the gap between the longest and shortest lifespans appears to be increasing. In particular, the life expectancy of those in the lowest and the highest socio-economic groups is diverging for the first time since the 1870s.

The full report, An investigation into inequalities in adult lifespan, is published today.

It finds:

  • In England and Wales, 5% of men that have attained the age of 30 are living on average to 96.0 years, 33.3 years longer than the lowest 10%.
  • This gap grew by 1.7 years between 1993, when it was at its narrowest, and 2009.
  • It is the first time since the 1870s that the gap in life expectancy is widening
  • Unhealthy lifestyles are the main causes of this widening gap.
  • For women, the longest surviving are reaching 98.2 years-old, 31 years longer than the lowest. The female gap reached its narrowest in 2005, but has since levelled out
  • Men in lower socio-economic groups are most likely to make damaging lifestyle choices.

Report author Professor Mayhew said:

“We looked at data from the 1870s onwards comparing England and Wales with France and Italy. It was clear that the first half of the 20th Century was characterised by a narrowing of the gap in life span as everyone benefited from improvements in clean drinking water, better housing, higher incomes and better health. Despite general rises in life expectancy after 1950, the life expectancy gap between men and women widened whilst inequalities in lifespan persisted rather than narrowing further.

“We found that since the 1990s lifespan inequalities in men have actually worsened in England and Wales. This is partly due to some men now living to exceptionally old ages and in many cases equalling women but at the other end of the distribution there has been a lack of progress.  The research blames the widening disparity on poor life style choices rather than ambient risks which were prevalent in the first half of the 20th Century. Key amongst these is smoking, drinking and poor diet – choices that are more likely to be made by the poorest in society.

A previous UK Government set a target in 2003 that by 2010 inequalities in health outcomes should be reduced by 10% as measured by life expectancy at birth. Not only was the target missed but in fact the opposite has happened. The research concludes the answer is not so much about redistributing healthcare expenditure but more about changing lifestyle habits. The research argues that more powerful policy tools aimed at behavioural change are needed to steer people towards healthier lifestyles."

Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive added:

“This very timely report highlights how, despite huge increases in life expectancy, the gap between rich and poor is increasing for the first time since the 1870s. This trend is particularly worrying for society and policymakers must do more to begin to narrow this gap again. Preventing inequalities in ill health and disability must be a priority for policy action”.

Additional findings including comparisons to France and Italy:

- Male life expectancy in England and Wales at age 30 is currently higher than in either France or Italy, although the margin of difference post 1950 is usually about one year or less. Female life expectancy in France and Italy is currently higher than in England and Wales and has improved by greater amounts since 1950.

- In absolute terms the male age inequality gap is currently higher in France than in England or Wales which in turn is higher than in Italy. Currently it is 37.0 years in France as compared with 33.3 years in England and Wales and only 31.7 years in Italy. The fact that male age inequalities in Italy continued to narrow in period B by more than in period A is especially worthy of note.

- In absolute terms, the female age inequality gap is currently lowest in Italy, standing at 28.2 years as compared with 30.6 years in France and 31.0 years in England and Wales. The level of improvement in Italy and France since 1950 has been notably higher than in England and Wales. In Italy, for example, the gap closed by 5.8 years but in England and Wales by only 3.1 years.

- If gender differences in age related inequalities are compared, we find that the gap is currently bigger in France than in either Italy or England and Wales and that it also continues to widen. In England and Wales the gender gap in age inequalities has been the lowest of all three countries and remarkably similar throughout periods A and B. However, this similarity ceased after 1990 when the male gap started to re-widen.

A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) demonstrates that a failure to prevent, diagnose, and treat depression, diabetes and urinary tract infections in people with dementia could be costing the UK’s health and social care system up to nearly £1 billion per year.

The report, ‘Dementia and Comorbidities: Ensuring parity of care’, which was kindly supported by Pfizer, shows that people with dementia are less likely to have cases of depression, diabetes or urinary tract infections diagnosed, and those that do are less likely to receive the same help to manage and treat these comorbidities.

This lack of parity can lead to people’s dementia worsening more quickly leading to greater health and social care costs. ILC-UK demonstrate an annual total net loss of up to approximately £994.4 million for just three conditions:

  • £501.7 million for people with dementia and depression
  • £377 million for people with dementia and diabetes
  • £115.7 million for people with dementia and urinary tract infections

The report also finds that the failure to prevent, diagnose, and treat comorbidities in people with dementia is leading to this group having a reduced quality of life and an earlier death than people who have the same medical conditions, but do not have dementia. It highlights how:

  • Hospital in-patients with dementia are over three times more likely to die during their first admission to hospital for an acute medical condition than those without dementia.
  • Four of the five most common comorbidities people with dementia are admitted to hospital for in the UK are preventable conditions - a fall, broken/fractured hip or hip replacement, urine infection and chest infection.

The ILC-UK identifies six key areas which appear to be leading to the discrepancy in health outcomes for people with dementia and comorbidities:

1. Atypical symptoms. People with dementia often present atypical symptoms which may lead to carers and medical professionals interpreting these problems as worsening dementia and neglecting other conditions as a potential cause.
2. Communication difficulties between medical professionals/carers and people with dementia, and between medical professional themselves, leading to lower standards of care.
3. A failure by the health system to recognise the individual as a whole, instead focussing on the person as a patient with a given diagnosis, leading to the optimisation of care for dementia while the individual continues to deteriorate because of poor management of a comorbid condition or vice versa.
4. A knowledge gap of hospital staff and carers in caring for people with dementia and comorbidities.
5. Poor medication management relating to how people with dementia’s medications are prescribed, monitored, administered and/or dispensed.
6. A lack of support to aid self-management and poor monitoring of comorbidities by health professionals.

The ILC-UK have set out seven recommendations which will help to ensure that parity occurs:

1. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) must update its condition specific guidelines to take into account the needs of a people with dementia in order to ensure this group receive the same level of care as the rest of the population.
2. Care homes should modify the care plans of residents with dementia to include checklists covering the symptoms of common comorbidities (such as UTIs) to help ensure early diagnosis and treatment.
3. Health professionals must involve people with dementia, their carers and families in every decision about their care to improve both the diagnosis and management of comorbidities.
4. Health Education England should consider broadening its tier one dementia awareness training to include how dementia may affect care for both short and long term conditions.
5. Health trusts should develop comprehensive catheter action plans, based around staff education and training, to reduce the incidence of UTIs in people with dementia through unnecessary catheter usage.
6. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) should consider making it mandatory for care homes to undertake annual check-ups for residents with dementia and diabetes where their blood glucose levels, cholesterol levels and vision are monitored.
7. Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) should commission a wide range of psychological therapies at a suitable capacity to ensure that GPs are not reliant on drugs to treat depression in dementia patients. 

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK said:

It is an absolute scandal that Doctors, nurses and healthcare workers are too often failing to see people living with dementia as more than simply this disease. As such our health system is too often failing to prevent, diagnose, and treat comorbidities among people with dementia. This failure has a devastating impact on quality of life, and results in earlier deaths. A failure to prevent adds avoidable financial pressures to our cash strapped health service.

Jeremy Hughes, Chief Executive of Alzheimer’s Society, said:

The reality for many people with dementia is that they have to contend with other long-term conditions, all of which greatly impact their quality of life. As this report highlights, to view dementia in isolation not only makes poor economic sense, but can cause unnecessary suffering. While initiatives to integrate health and social care services are a step in the right direction, it is clear government plans need to go much further to truly meet the needs of people with dementia and other health conditions.

Alzheimer’s Society is working with the All Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia to better understand the experiences of people living with dementia and other conditions. Our report is due later this month.

Roz Schneider, MD Global Patient Affairs Lead at Pfizer said:

This report clearly highlights disparities in care and health outcomes that are associated with people living with dementia who also have comorbid illnesses. Patients and their caregivers, as well as others in their support community, can provide subtle yet critical insights about medical changes that affect these patient’s lives. Such a collaborative approach could lessen or avoid the progression of some comorbid conditions. That is why this expanded care community stand ready to partner with healthcare teams in order to advance these important healthcare conversations and care decisions.

Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) on 020 7340 0440, or 07531 164 886.

Notes

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

The ILC-UK is an independent, research led, think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and demographic change. Based in the heart of Westminster, much of our work is directed at the highest levels of government in London, Europe and internationally.

Our policy and research remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We are recruiting a part-time Finance Manager who will provide maternity cover to support our growing research and events team.

We are looking for an experienced, flexible and proactive candidate to support the Senior Management Team in managing the financials of the organisation. The post will be responsible for maintaining the current financial position of ILC-UK and ensuring we meet all financial regulatory requirements.

You must have excellent communication skills, with a high level of attention to detail and be qualified or part-qualified in accountancy as well as have experience of using Sage Line 50. You should have a good understanding and interest in the work that the ILC-UK undertakes and this should be reflected in your covering letter (www.ilcuk.org.uk).

You must also have a good knowledge of Microsoft Office programmes (MS Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint). We are looking for someone who has a conscientious attitude, who is comfortable working in a small team.

Person Specification

  1. Essential: Minimum of AAT accounting qualification or studying towards a professional qualification, e.g., ACCA, CIMA or similar.
  2. Essential: Working experience of Sage Line 50, undertaking VAT returns and reporting to Companies House and the Charity Commission.
  3. Essential: Some knowledge of not for profit organisations and small companies’ statutory reporting requirements.
  4. Essential: Ability to work independently in a highly-pressured environment and to tight deadlines in a small team.
  5. Essential: Strong written and oral communication skills.
  6. Essential: IT literate including Microsoft Office.
  7. Essential: Experience dealing with confidential matters.
  8. Essential: Able to demonstrate the links between finance information and relevant business needs/uses.
  9. Desirable: Experience or interest in the field of longevity, demographics or ageing issues.
  10. Desirable: At least 2 year’s hands-on all round experience, dealing with all aspects of financial management in a small charity setting, including budget management.

Send a (maximum) two page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Operations Director at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field. Please also confirm where you originally saw this advert.

Hours
2 days a week, 14 hours (flexibility on days/ hours per day)

Application deadline
Midnight, Sunday 1 May 2016

Duration of contract
12- 15 months (including handover period)

Interview date
Friday 20 May 2016

Salary
Up to £35,000 per annum, pro rata.

Start date
June 2016

Place of Work
Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Please click on the below link to review the Job Description for this position.

Documents:

Job Description - ILC-UK Finance Manager - Maternity Cover (PDF)

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Welcome to the April edition of the ILC-UK update

Since our February updated, we have published two new reports, opened registration for the second annual Future of Ageing Conference, given oral evidence to a parliamentary Inquiry and participated in a live TV debate on the State Pension age.

On Thursday 17th March Ben Franklin, ILC-UK's Head of Economics of Ageing presented our response to the 2016 Budget in the House of Lords. The slides presented at the event, supported by our Partners Programme are now available to download here.

ILC-UK establish high level alcohol Inquiry and call for written evidence

The Drink Wise Age Well partnership of leading national alcohol and ageing charities have launched an Inquiry, led by the ILC-UK into alcohol-related harm amongst the over 50s.

Each year we will hold an Inquiry on a key theme pertaining to alcohol and the over 50s and for 2016, we aim to explore and consider employment.

The 2016 Inquiry will focus on three key areas: alcohol and over 50s seeking employment; alcohol and over 50s currently in employment; and alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement.

We are inviting submissions of written evidence for one, two or all of the three key areas.

For more information on how to submit written evidence to the Inquiry, please click here.

The Inquiry will also be holding three oral evidence sessions. For more information about the oral evidence sessions and to register to attend as an audience member, please click here.

ILC-UK give evidence to the Work and Pension Committee's Intergenerational Fairness Inquiry



Click the image to see ILC-UK's Head of Economics of Ageing
Ben Franklin give evidence to the Intergenerational Fairness Inquiry

As part of the Work and Pensions Select Committee's Inquiry into Intergenerational Fairness, ILC-UK's Head of Economics of Ageing, Ben Franklin, gave oral evidence to the committee on Wednesday 16th March.

To view the transcript of the oral evidence session, please click here.

ILC-UK Publications

Tomorrow's World: The Future of Ageing in the UK

What might the future of ageing look like? Will we live longer, healthier and wealthier lives, or will there be too little for too many? Using data featured in the expert testimony delivered at the 2015 Future of Ageing conference, this report describes the future challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing population.

The Future of Private Pension Saving

The Future of Private Pension Saving, kindly supported by Age UK, brought together Parliamentarians, business, academics and industry experts to discuss how best the UK Government can incentivise private pension saving.

ILC-UK Events

Drink Wise, Age Well Inquiry - Alcohol and Employment in the Over 50s Population
Monday, 18th April; Friday, 6th May; Monday, 23rd May 2016

ILC-UK, supported by the Drink Wise, Age Well partnership of alcohol and ageing charities and academic institutions from across the UK will lead a high level Inquiry into the relationship between alcohol and employment in the over 50s population in the UK. The Inquiry aims to reach out and engage with a wide cross section of stakeholders and generate wider political public awareness, understanding and traction on this issue.

The Inquiry will be held over three dates with each session focussing on a different theme. For more information, and to register to attend any of the sessions, please click here.

Roundtable Discussion: Means Testing of Adult Social Care in England
Tuesday, 26th April

Professor Les Mayhew of Cass Business School has drafted a new paper on the topic of means testing of adult social care. ILC-UK will be launching the paper with Professor Mayhew later in the year, but ahead of the launch, we will be holding a roundtable discussion to allow contributors to provide expert input on the draft paper as well as comment on the recommendations.

This is an invitation only roundtable discussion, but if you are interested in more information please contact events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Unequal Ageing: The Future of State Pension Age and Inequalities in Life Expectancy
Tuesday, 3rd May 2016

ILC-UK and Cass Business School host a private debate and reception, supported by the ILC-UK Partners Programme and hosted by Prudential.

During the debate, Cass Business School's Professor Les Mayhew will present new research revealing that the life expectancy gap between the richest and poorest has begun to increase. Following the presentation, respondents from the ILC-UK, industry and the voluntary sector will explore how public policy should best respond to the growing inequality.

Spaces for this event are very limited. To register to attend, please click here.

Second National Retirement Income Summit
Friday, 10th June 2016

ILC-UK's Second National Retirement Income Summit will take place on Friday, 10th June 2016, and is hosted by the Chartered Insurance Institute. For more information about the Summit, including details on the current policy landscape, the agenda and confirmed speakers, please follow the link below.

The Summit is now fully booked. To join the waiting list, please click here.

The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference
Wednesday, 9th November 2016

The annual Future of Ageing conference assembles experts from the fields of health, housing, finance and business to identify the challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing society.

Confirmed speakers for the 2016 Future of Ageing conference include The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Cantebury 1991-2002; Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing; George Magnus, Economist and Author of The Age of Aging (2008), and; Dr Maragaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health.

For more information about the 2016 Future of Ageing conference, including details on our early bird rates, please click here.

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our February update, we have published a summary of our press highlights from the first quarter of 2016, 'ILC-UK in the news - January, February and March' including links to stories featuring ILC-UK research.

In February we published a three part special Valentine's Day series on sex and love in later life: 'Sexual desire and sexual activities in later life', 'Finding Love in later life', and 'Rethinking relationships in later life', which all provide new insights based on analysis of data from the English Longitudinal Survey.

We also published two expert guest blogs: 'Just lie to yourself: the (real) secret to longer life' by Dr Austen Hayes, Clinical Instructor at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, and a piece by Jennifer Noel of Compassion in Dying on their new website designed to allow people to draft a free Advance decision.

On the 4th April, the 10th anniversary of the final report of the Pension Commission, ILC-UK published new analysis in 'Pension Commission:10 years on', and called for the Government to introduce a new cross party Pension Commission.

To visit the ILC-UK blog, please click here.
 

Working with ILC-UK

PARTNERS PROGRAMME

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti Paymaster, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

The Drink Wise Age Well partnership of leading national alcohol and ageing charities have launched an Inquiry, led by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) into alcohol-related harm amongst the over 50s.

Each year we will hold an Inquiry on a key theme pertaining to alcohol and the over 50s and for 2016, we aim to explore and consider employment. We have selected this theme for 2016 based on some of the early findings from the Drink Wise Age Well survey; of those surveyed whose alcohol use has increased, 40% cite retirement and 20% loss of purpose for their increased consumption.

The 2016 Inquiry will focus on three key areas: alcohol and over 50s seeking employment; the second will examine alcohol and over 50s currently in employment; and the third will focus on alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement. We are inviting submissions of written evidence for one, two or all of the three key areas.

Guidelines on making a submission

  • If you would like to make a submission of written evidence to the Inquiry, please state clearly who the submission is from, i.e. whether from yourself in a personal capacity or sent on behalf of an organisation.
  • Please be concise – we recommend no more than 1500 words in length.
  • Include a brief introduction about yourself/your organisation and your reason for submitting evidence.
  • Include any factual information you have to offer from which the Inquiry might be able to draw conclusions, or which could be put to other witnesses for their reactions.
  • Include any recommendations for action by the Government or others which you would like the Inquiry to consider.

Submissions of written evidence might consider:

1. To what extent does alcohol use either indirectly or directly impact employment prospects, job seeking activities and work performance in the over 50s? With around 1 million people aged 50-64 across the UK not currently in work but wanting to work, to what extent might alcohol-related harm be a cause, and/or symptom of prolonged unemployment? For those in work, what are the workplace consequences of alcohol-related harm?

2. What sort of interventions are required to encourage and support over 50s either seeking work, in work or in retirement with issues around alcohol? Evidence relating to successful interventions may focus on the role of service providers, the perspective of a service user, or a combination of these perspectives.

The final report is intended for a policy and public audience, so written submissions should be accessible but at the same time, informative, thought provoking and ideally challenging while offering solutions/recommendations. The written submissions will form a key part of the evidence base for the next annual State of the Nation report; our last State of the Nation report received wide media exposure and was covered by the BBC1 Breakfast Show, The Sunday Times and The Telegraph amongst other publications, and all submission will be acknowledged where referenced. To submit written evidence please email events@ilcuk.org.uk. Please note there is a final deadline of any submissions of Friday, 1st July 2016.

We are also holding three high level oral evidence sessions in the House of Lords:
• Monday 18th April – alcohol and over 50s seeking employment;
• Friday 6th May – alcohol and over 50s currently in employment;
• Monday 23rd May – alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement.

If you would like to attend any or all of these evidence sessions as an audience member please visit the ILC-UK website for further details:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/drink_wise_age_well_alcohol_inquiry

This is an independent Inquiry, with the ILC-UK providing the governance and secretariat while the Chair will drive the agenda and findings. Baroness Sally Greengross will chair the Inquiries evidence sessions, which are kindly supported by the Big Lottery Fund.


Please note:
Authors are requested to provide a very short biography of themselves/organisations of no more than four lines to sit alongside their submission. Due to time constraints, we will only be making minor amendments/proofing so all submissions need to be of a publishable standard, ILC-UK reserves the right not to publish if material is deemed inappropriate. All authors and their organisation will be credited in the final report and any associated publicity and promotional material linked to the response.

ILC-UK analysis highlights progress made over past decade but find that

  • median contribution rates are falling and a growing proportion of us have no savings
  • the average time spent in retirement continues to increase

Ten years to the day after the final report of the Pension Commission, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) have announced its second National Retirement Income Summit.

The Pensions Commission painted a future where individuals would need to do a combination of working longer, saving more, or paying more tax. The Commission argued that a failure to act would lead to poorer pensioners.

ILC-UK analysis, published today, highlights positive progress in extending working lives, preventing pensioner poverty and getting more people into saving. But the think tank warns of complacency and paints a bleak picture for future pensioners.

ILC-UK analysis, published on its website finds that since the Pensions Commission

  • The average age of exit from the labour force is increasing but it is still below what it was in the 1960s and 1970s
  • In fact, the average time spent in retirement continues to increase
  • Auto-enrolment has delivered a growing number of employees with workplace pensions
  • But median contribution rates are low and a growing proportion of us have no savings. Final Salary pension coverage continues to fall
  • Younger people are less well placed than previous generations to save and may attract lower long term returns on their savings
  • Effective tax rates have been falling but have increased more recently
  • Spending on pensioner benefits slightly above the long run average as a percentage of GDP.

ILC-UK’s second Retirement Income Summit will be hosted by the Chartered Insurance Institute on 10th June 2015. Registration is open now. Confirmed speakers at the event include: Baroness Jeanie Drake; Steve Webb (Royal London); Gregg McClymont (Aberdeen Asset Management); Professor David Blake (Cass); Chip Castille (Blackrock); and Michelle Cracknell (TPAS).

In 2012, ILC-UK organised its first Retirement Income Summit which provided a platform for discussion between 180 policymakers, senior insurance industry experts, business representatives, charities and academics.

ILC-UK Chief Executive, Baroness Sally Greengross saidThe Pensions Commission can claim credit for successful public policy change. Auto-enrolment has enrolled many more people into the long term saving habit.

Relative pensioner incomes have increased due to a combination of later retirement, the pensions “triple lock” and increased earning power of the baby boomers.

However, the future for retirement income looks less rosy. Ongoing demographic change, low in work earnings growth, and low investment returns are contributing to significant uncertainty. The new “single tier” pension will be less generous for the majority in the long term. Fewer people will find themselves receiving the more generous final salary pensions.

With the onset of pension freedoms, retirees over the next 20 years will face many more options. Making the wrong decision could result in people living longer than their money or result in under-consumption as people worry about making their money last.  Navigating the retirement income maze will require better information, advice and financial capability.

The Chartered Insurance Institute agrees that such a Pensions Commission would be the better approach given the complexities of the wider personal pensions taxation. David Thomson, Director of Policy & Public Affairs saidNow that the Budget has been published and Lifetime ISAs unveiled to improve savings among younger adults, these announcements afford the Government extra time to revisit the idea of a Pensions Commission to explore the more complex question of wider pensions tax relief.”

“We said over a year ago that the Government may be tempted by short-term political and fiscal expediency of widening the Taxed-Exempt-Exempt ISA model to private pensions more generally. However such a move has longer-term economic, demographic and intergenerational implications that are exercising most, if not all, western industrial societies. Any major reform needs to have broad-based support both among policymakers and across society and a Pensions Commission might prove to be an elegant solution to achieve this.

Contact

Dave Eaton or David Sinclair, ILC-UK 02073400440

The ILC-UK Retirement Income Summit will take place on Friday 10th June 2016; 09:15 - 16:30 (followed by a short drinks reception). The Chartered Insurance Institute, 20 Aldermanbury, London EC2V 7HY. Spaces for the retirement income summit can be booked at: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/second_national_retirement_income_summit

Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Assistant, ILC-UK said:

‘The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) welcomes the Work and Pensions Select Committee’s inquiry into support for the bereaved. After decades of the numbers of deaths in the UK falling, 2015 marked a ‘tipping point’ where the historic trend started to reverse: as the oldest of the babyboomer generation move through their later years, deaths are expected to rise by 20% .

As our 2015 report ‘The Funeral Time Bomb’ commissioned by mutual OneFamily found that funeral debt (where money has been borrowed to cover the cost of a funeral) in the UK could reach a quarter of a billion pounds in less than 20 years, we welcome the Committee’s call to raise the maximum Social Fund Funeral Payment to the price of a ‘simple funeral’.

However, our report also found that the price of a simple funeral could rise to £5226 by 2020. As more than half of UK households have less than £3000 in savings , we would urge the Department for Work and Pensions to consider carefully how it can support people during such extremely difficult periods’.


Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) on 07531 164 886.

Responding to the latest Aviva Working Lives report, David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), said:

Ten years on from final Pension Commission report, we see more people saving due to the success of auto-enrolment. Now is the time to build on this success.

Almost half of those working later than they hoped, are doing so because they haven’t saved enough. Whilst we have more people saving, the levels are woefully inadequate, particularly given we are living longer. Investment returns remain relatively low so even those who are saving aren’t getting the return they hoped for.

With the Cridland review exploring further increases to state pension age, future pensioners should be prepared to need to work longer. But this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. As the research points out, for many older people, working longer provides a “feelgood factor”.

Government and employers must find ways of ensuring that older people aren’t forced out of the workforce prematurely. The benefit of extending working lives goes beyond the benefit to individuals. UK plc faces a significant economic hit if we don’t better adapt workplaces to cope with demographic change.

On 10th June, ILC-UK are organising their second Retirement Income Summit.

A new report by Professor Les Mayhew and Dr David Smith from Cass Business School's Faculty of Actuarial Science and Insurance and Duncan O' Leary, Research Director at Demos draws on research published by the International Longevity Centre - UK into the concept of the 'Equity Bank'.

'Paying for Care Costs in Later Life Using the Value in People's Homes', published in The Geneva Papers examines two new financial arrangements designed to meet the needs of people whom require social care in different financial circumstances. The first option considered is an equity-backed insurance product, and the second an 'Equity Bank' (the idea of using the home as a low-cost method to boost income).

The concept was originally explored in 'The UK Equity Bank - Towards Income Security in Old Age' published by the International Longevity Centre - UK. The UK Equity Bank would allow people to exchange a fixed proportion of the equity in their home for a lifetime income linked to inflation. The report found that providing people with a secure income by unlocking the equity in housing assets could improve standards of living for the benefit of the people themselves, the local community and society as a whole.

To read 'Paying for Care Costs in Later Life Using the Value in People's Homes' in full, please follow the link below.

Chrome users using the default PDF reader may have difficulty downloading PDF files. Please use an alternative browser or install a PDF reader plugin. If you are still experiencing issues, contact info@ilcuk.org.uk.
 

 

Documents:

Paying for Care Costs in Later Life Using the Value in People's Homes ()

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For Immediate Release

3 March 2015

Press Release

Charities and industry experts warn against a move to a “pension ISA” system for saving

A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) supported by Age UK, calls on the Government to avoid damaging confidence in our pensions system at the forthcoming Budget, and to act to foster a ‘savings culture’.

‘The Future of Private Pension Saving’ warns the Government against reforming the pensions system in a way which would disincentivise saving, in particular, arguing that switching to a 'Pension ISA' system where tax is paid upfront and income in retirement is received tax-free (known as a TEE or taxed-exempt-exempt system), would be highly damaging to saving.

The report highlights research that has shown that under a TEE system, employers would expect their staff to save less and would place a lower value on employer contributions. There is a very real risk that a TEE system would ‘kill’ pension saving, as people would not find the promise of tax exempt withdrawals forty year later to be credible.

Instead, the report concludes, the Chancellor should use this opportunity to encourage pension saving by reforming tax relief to make it fairer to lower earners, and explain the roles of both Government and employers in helping people to save. 

The report, ‘The Future of Private Pension Saving’, makes a series of recommendations based on a discussion held between industry experts, consumer and business representatives on Monday 25th January in the House of Lords.

David Sinclair, Director at the International Longevity Centre - UK said:

“Despite the success of auto enrolment, too many younger people are saving far too little to give them a decent income in retirement. The Chancellor must ensure that future generations have access to the best incentives to support saving.

We need long term savings policy, not one where the goal posts move from Budget to Budget. But developing a long term savings strategy to avoid future pensioner poverty will go far beyond tax incentives. Government needs to work with employers and savers to create this savings strategy. We must plan now for the long term.”

Caroline Abrahams Charity Director at Age UK said:

“We fervently hope that all the talk about moving towards an ISA-style pensions system with contributions made after tax remains just that – talk: we are wholly unconvinced that such a scheme would benefit this or future generations and extremely worried that it could, in fact, put off lots of people from saving for a pension at all.”

“The stakes are extremely high: dignity in retirement for millions of people in this country depends on us having a good, well-functioning pension system, and we undermine that at our peril.”

Eminent US pensions expert David John, Senior Strategic Policy Adviser at the AARP (American Association of Retired Persons) presented evidence from the US experience, where TEE systems do not provide a savings incentive. He said:

“Evidence shows that only 15% of retirement savers are ‘active savers’, i.e. those who respond to tax subsidies and move their assets accordingly”.

The report also calls on the Government to maintain the existing system of tax relief up front and to consider other ways of incentivising private pension saving beyond the tax system.

Yvonne Braun, Director of Long Term Savings at the ABI said:

"There is a strong case for reform of the pension tax relief system to make it fairer and more sustainable. At present more than 70 percent of tax relief goes to higher earners. Moving to a single rate of tax relief, reframed as a Savers' Bonus, would spread that more evenly, increasing the incentive to save for Basic Rate taxpayers.

“In contrast, a Pension ISA would damage the economy and lower savings, making it unsustainable given the UK's looming demographic challenges.”

Contact

Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) on 020 7340 0440, or 07531 164 886.

Notes

The Future of Private Pension saving is available on the ILC-UK website at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/the_future_of_private_pension_saving

ILC-UK are hosting their second Retirement Income Summit on 10th June, hosted by CII. http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/second_national_retirement_income_summit

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

The ILC-UK is an independent, research led, think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and demographic change. Based in the heart of Westminster, much of our work is directed at the highest levels of government in London, Europe and Internationally.

Our policy and research remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We are looking to recruit an intern who can join part of our growing team in addressing some of the key demographic challenges of today.

Over the last year, we have enjoyed great success both in terms of our impact and reach, and, as a result, we are looking to grow our team.  We are currently seeking an intern to learn and contribute to our work and gain experience and understanding of our policy, research and events activities.

We are looking for an enthusiastic, flexible and eager intern who is willing to embrace all aspects of the organisation. In return, you will gain valuable experience on a range of assignments: from supporting colleagues in the delivery of a project or high profile event, to independently managing the delivery of key research; you will have real responsibility from week one. Many of our interns have continued their employment with the ILC-UK after their initial placement and this represents a great opportunity to work with a small, dynamic and friendly team in the heart of Westminster.

You must have excellent research and writing skills, with a high level of attention to detail. Being adept in interpreting and using data, allied to a good knowledge of current economic, health and public policy debates, would be advantageous. Candidates should have high standards of written and spoken English, and an ability to write for both academic and lay audiences. You should have a good understanding and interest in the work that the ILC-UK undertakes and this should be reflected in your covering letter (www.ilcuk.org.uk).

You must have a good knowledge of Microsoft Office programmes (MS Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint). We are looking for someone who has a flexible attitude, who is comfortable working in a small team and who is able to adapt to new tasks with ease and work in a fast paced environment.
We are open to applications from recent graduates, or individuals looking for experience in a policy environment.
Key skills

  1. Essential: Able to support the research team with a range of research activities, including:
    • Information and evidence gathering.
    • Undertaking literature reviews.
    • Strong analysis of official statistics and other data using Excel.
    • Report writing.
    • Referencing, formatting and dissemination
  2. Essential: Provide research assistance on briefings for team members attending meetings and events.
  3. Essential: Develop and produce blogs for the ILC-UK website.
  4. Essential: Provide communications support, including drafting press releases and writing occasional articles for magazines.
  5. Essential: Understanding of UK policy environment and influencing process.
  6. Essential: Ability to work independently in a highly-pressured environment and to tight deadlines in a small team.
  7. Essential: Strong written and oral communication skills.
  8. Desirable: Interest or experience of working on longevity, demographic or ageing issues in the field of research or policy.
  9. Desirable: Experience or interest in the dissemination of research and presentation of results.

Send a (maximum) two page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Director of Research and Strategy at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.

If selected for interview you will be asked to produce a short sample of your written work.

Hours
5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible for the right candidate)

Application deadline
Midnight, Sunday 27th March 2016

Duration of contract
6 months with strong potential for an ongoing formal position.

Interview date
Week commencing Monday 18th April 2016

Salary
London Living Wage: £9.40 per hour

Start date
As soon as possible

Place of Work
Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Please click on the below link to review the Job Description for this position.

Documents:

Research and Policy Intern - Job Description (PDF)

Get the free PDF reader

The ILC-UK is an independent, research led, think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and demographic change. Based in the heart of Westminster, much of our work is directed at the highest levels of government in London, Europe and Internationally.

Our policy and research remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design and the macroeconomic implications of population change. We are looking to recruit a full-time Researcher who can join part of our growing team in addressing some of the key demographic challenges of today.

We need a Researcher with excellent writing skills and a strong passion for policy to join our busy and expanding team. Experience in quantitative research or a background in economics would be beneficial but certainly not essential.

This is a great opportunity for someone who has a genuine interest in the socioeconomic consequences of population ageing; an engaging writing style that can stimulate policy-makers; and an enquiring mind-set.

Key skills:

  1. Essential: Degree or Higher degree in Social Sciences with Research Methods Component including Quantitative Analysis.
  2. Essential: Has some experience of conducting research beyond an undergraduate degree – e.g. at post-graduate level, or experience working for a charity, think tank or business.
  3. Essential: Demonstrable experience of producing or contributing towards high quality reports in either an academic or policy context.
  4. Essential: Proven ability to write engaging articles, briefs and reports for different audiences in pressurised, tight deadline environments.
  5. Essential: Ability to work independently but to offer support and guidance to more junior members of the research team as well as work with other members of the team.
  6. Desirable: Experience of fundraising through leading on, or contributing to, tenders or project proposals from ideally a range of funders, including Government, academic trusts, foundations and charities.
  7. Desirable: Experience of the dissemination of research and the presentation of results in an academic, public or policy setting.
  8. Desirable: Experience of leading or contributing to tenders or projects proposals.
  9. Desirable: Demonstrable interest or experience of working on ageing related issues and a knowledge or interest of public policy environment in this field including policy development and the political process.

The ILC-UK envisages this post to be a full-time position but is happy to consider part-time arrangements, secondments or permanent placements for the right candidate. The post is initially offered on a year contract, with the strong possibility of extension and increase for the right candidate, who will then develop their own programs of work in ageing research.

Send a (maximum) two page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Director of Research and Strategy at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.

If selected for interview you will be asked to produce a short sample of your written work.

Hours
5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible for the right candidate)

Application deadline
Midnight, Sunday 27th March 2016

Duration of contract
1 year contract with a 6 month review, and a strong possibility of extension and increase for the right person.

Interview date
Week commencing Monday 18th April 2016

Salary
£22k - £25k, depending on experience

Start date
As soon as possible

Place of Work
Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Please click on the below link to review the Job Description for this position.

Documents:

Researcher - Job Description (PDF)

Get the free PDF reader

Press Release

Future of Ageing bleak without better planning

A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) argues that our ageing society offers significant social and economic opportunities but only if policymakers plan better for the long term.

The report, ‘Tomorrow’s World: The Future of Ageing in the UK’ describes the future challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing population.

The ILC-UK argues that our society is not adequately responding to ageing today:

  • The social care system is crumbling and health care is failing to incentivise the prevention of ill health.
  • The housing and planning system is failing to respond to ageing resulting in people living in housing which does not meet their needs.
  • Individuals are currently underestimating their life expectancy and risking running out of money in retirement.

ILC-UK point out that without action today, the picture in 10 years time could be much worse. The report predicts that average pensioner incomes will start falling as more people retire with a less generous state pension and without the benefit of final salary pensions.

If urgent action is not taken to address the challenges posed by population ageing, ILC-UK presents a future in which health expenditure has increased debt as a proportion of GDP to 180%; more than 1 million additional care workers are required to meet the demand for social care; and millions have failed to save enough ahead of retirement.

ILC-UK predicts that:

  • Without action to better support more disadvantaged social groups and communities, the gap in life expectancy between the wealthy and the poor will continue to increase.
  • Without action to address the current funding and workforce shortages in health and social care, the future needs of our ageing population are unlikely to be met.
  • Without action to better highlight how long people are likely to live, and the measures that they need to take to ensure financial security later in old age, even wealthier older adults may experience financial difficulties in later life.
  • Without action to encourage and facilitate longer working lives we will see a future drop in the UK’s employment rate and reductions in overall productivity.
  • Without action to build more houses, and houses which are adapted to the needs of older people, the housing shortage will continue.

The report proposes 10 long-term indicators of progress. ILC-UK plan to report against these indicators at their next Future of Ageing Conference on November 9th.

1. Health must find a way to be more responsive and preventative
2. Government must make progress in delivering a long term settlement to pay for social care
3. Savings levels for working age adults must increase
4. Average age of exit from the workforce should rise
5. The number and type of homes built should be increasingly appropriate for our ageing society
6. Government should make progress in facilitating greater risk sharing in accumulation and decumulation of retirement income
7. We must have a more informed older consumer
8. Our aspirations for retirement must be about much more than us spending more hours watching television
9. Businesses should better respond to ageing
10. We must strengthen the social contract between young and old

The report incorporates expert testimony from contributors at ILC-UK’s first Future of Ageing Conference which took place on Tuesday 24th November 2015. ILC-UK’s second Future of Ageing Conference will take place on Wednesday 9th November 2016: http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said:

‘If we want future generations of older people to age well policymakers must act now. The UK’s demography is slow to change and we can make some reasonable predictions and forecasts on how this may influence UK society over the next ten years. This gives us an opportunity to plan for the change we will witness. We can’t wait and hope ageing goes away. It won’t’.

Dr Michael Hutton, Chief Scientific Officer, Neurodegenerative Disease at Eli Lilly and Company Ltd said:

‘An ageing population is placing pressure on finite NHS resources whilst there are also important concerns about the quality of care, particularly for our elderly population in health and social care settings. The total cost of conditions such as dementia is huge. When assessing the scale of the problem, we must have a holistic understanding of the disease to ensure patients and their families are adequately supported and also to prevent a knock on effect to our economy, as this caring role prevents ‘carers’ from accessing other forms of employment’.

‘Innovation offers the NHS a real opportunity to meet the challenge of increasing demand on resources and squeezed budgets. Lilly was delighted to support this event and help develop ideas, to make the UK the best possible environment for supporting an ageing population’.

Lord Filkin, Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better said:

‘If we don’t build the social care workforce by some mechanism both in volume and skill we are in trouble. It is hard to overstate what a bad place we are in. The system is crumbling now. Social care needs to have increased investment: the increase in long term conditions in the older population will drive big increases in demand and cost’.

Professor Ian Philp CBE, Deputy Medical Director for Older People, Heart of England Foundation Trust said:

I think we can turn a concern about the costs of an ageing population into an opportunity to see growth, partly because so much wealth, asset wealth and disposable income sits with older people in our society. That wealth can be mobilised, for example to pay for major infrastructure projects through investment and return. We could turn it on its head from the apocalyptic tales of ‘we can't afford an ageing population’ to ‘my goodness what an asset’. 

Emma McWilliam, Hymans Robertson LLP said:

‘Grey hair is definitely something to be celebrated. That's easier to do when governments have applied wisdom to setting policies that encourage generations to save enough to enjoy retirement, as well as leaving a fair and sustainable legacy for future generations that we can be proud of. There is more that Government can do, both to safeguard future generations and to support people in retirement.

The Government's role in retirement should be to provide certainty through the flat rate state pension and act as an insurer of last resort for long-term care needs. To ensure those roles can be performed in a sustainable way, it's vital that individuals are clear about how much money they will have in retirement, how far off track they might be and what they need to do to get back on track. Talking about the 'savings gap' in general terms doesn't resonate with individuals.

They need to know how they will personally be affected. Technology is making that easier, and the government should pave the way to make that technology more readily available to greater numbers of people. Enabling a smoother transition into retirement through part-time working will also help address individuals' savings shortfalls, as well as deal with a potential future fall in UK productivity as we see greater swathes of the population ‘retired’.

Gary Day, Land & Planning Director from McCarthy & Stone, said:

‘The population is ageing rapidly but the UK’s housing stock is not coping with this change. There is a lack of choice when older people come to move to properties suitable for them in later life. This impacts negatively on a range of areas – poorer well-being, higher public spending on health and care, and blocked housing chains. We need to raise our focus beyond starter homes and encourage the building of more specialist housing suitable for older people across all tenures’.

Lord Filkin and Professor Ian Philp are available for further comment.

“Tomorrow’s World” has been made possible with the financial support of Eli Lilly.

Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) on 020 7340 0440, or 07531 164 886.

Notes
ILC-UK’s first Future of Ageing Conference took place in November 2015.
Representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society gathered for the first annual Future of Ageing conference, hosted by the International Longevity Centre – UK ILC-UK.

Speakers included Baroness Altmann (Pensions Minister), Lord Willetts (Executive Chair, the Resolution Foundation), Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Officer), Lord Filkin (Chair, Centre for Better Ageing and former Labour Minister with responsibility for Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare), Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies), and Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, The Economic and Social Research Council).

ILC-UK’s second Future of Ageing Conference will take place on Wednesday 9th November 2016 http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.


Welcome to the February edition of the ILC-UK update

On Monday 25th January our Chief Executive, Baroness Sally Greengross, hosted a discussion on the future of private pension saving in the House of Lords, supported by Age UK. The event sold out in just over an hour and featured the new Shadow Pensions Minister's first major speech.

We are also pleased to announce that the second Retirement Income Summit will be held on Friday 10th June.

ILC-UK Publications

Drink Wise, Age Well: Alcohol Use and the Over 50s in the UK

A hidden population of over 50s at increasing risk from their drinking may well be hidden in plain sight according to the first 'State of the Nation' report from Drink Wise, Age Well.

Generation Stuck: Exploring the Reality of Downsizing in Later Life

Downsizing is not for everyone, but there should be a good flow of information and housing options should people wish to move to improve their own personal situation in later life.

Financial Advice Market Review: A response from the International Longevity Centre - UK

ILC-UK has conducted new analysis to feed into FCA and HM Treasury Financial Advice Market Review, which argues that ensuring policy and practice raises confidence in the provision of advice is key to increasing uptake.

The End of Formal Adult Social Care?

Detailed analysis of the social care funding measures outlined in the Spending Review, conducted by the ILC-UK Centre for Later Life Funding and supported by Age UK reveals a bleak future for older people needing care.

George Holley-Moore introduces 'Drink Wise, Age Well: Alcohol Use and the Over 50s in the UK'

ILC-UK Events in 2016

We are pleased to announced that the second Retirement Income Summit will be held on Friday 10th June at the Chartered Insurance Institute. We will be releasing more information and opening the registration for this event very soon.

If you or your organisation are interested in sponsoring the second Retirement Income Summit, please contact our Events Manager, Lyndsey Mitchell, on events@ilcuk.org.uk.

If you have received this newsletter via a colleague and are not currently registered on our mailing list, you can do so by emailing us at events@ilcuk.org.uk, or by visiting www.ilcuk.org.uk.

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our December update, we have published a summary of the our press highlights from the final quarter of 2015, 'ILC-UK in the news - October, November and December' featuring links to all relevant media sources.

In January we published a guest blog from UCL's Professor David Metz which describes his motivation to create a new online resource to help families face end-of-life decisions; you can read David's blog here. To read more on end-of-life issues, you can also refer to David Sinclair's blog, 'Let's talk about death' which was also published in January.

In 'Financial education - why older people?', David Sinclair challenges the assumption that financial education need only be focused on younger people. The blog also presents ILC-UK's initial thoughts on why we believe there is an urgent need to better understand financial capability and its impact on retirement.

You can access the ILC-UK blog here; and the ILC Global Alliance blog here. If you would like to write a guest blog for us, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

ILC-UK launch new adult immunisation website

The International Longevity Centre – UK has launched the European Adult Immunisation Hub, www.adultimmunisation.eu/, made possible through the support of Pfizer.

Please do have a look at the website and engage with the facebook, Linkedin and twitter accounts we have launched to promote the site, using the hashtag #adultimmunsation.

We are organising editorial board meetings for the website on 1st March in London, and 11th March in Brussels. During the meetings we will discuss the barriers to adult immunisation and the plans for future content. If you would like to attend either of the editorial board meetings please email Dave Eaton events@ilcuk.org.uk

You can also receive regular updates from the European Adult Immunisation Hub by signing up to the newsletter, using the form on the homepage at http://www.adultimmunisation.eu/.

Working with ILC-UK

PARTNERS PROGRAMME

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti Paymaster, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Retirement Advantage, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk. We are increasing the cost of our Partners Programme for new members in April, so please get in touch as soon as possible if you are interested in joining.

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

 

 



 

 


NEW STUDY: STIGMA AND SHAME STOPPING ‘HIDDEN’ OVER 50s DRINKERS SEEKING HELP

Biggest ever study of its kind reveals attitudes towards alcohol and ageing could be leaving over 50s at increased risk of harm from alcohol. 

A hidden population of over 50s at increasing risk from their drinking may well be hidden in plain sight according to the Drink Wise, Age Well report released today. Attitudes held and experienced by older drinkers may stop them for asking for help in reducing their alcohol use.

Respondents who drank more than they used to gave age-related reasons for doing so. Furthermore, over three-quarters (83%) of those surveyed who were at increasing risk from alcohol use had never been asked about their drinking by someone who might be able to help. Risks associated with alcohol include depression, poor sleep, memory problems, and trouble with relationships as well as more serious illnesses such as cancer or liver disease.

The biggest-ever study of its kind into drinking behaviours among the over 50s surveyed over 16,700 people from 10 areas across the UK. Categories of risk were defined using the international recognised AUDIT screening tool.

Preliminary findings are:

  • Over half of respondents aged over 65 believe that people with an alcohol problem have themselves to blame. Nearly a quarter think they should feel ashamed.  
  • The five most frequently reported reasons for those who drink more now than in the past are age-related. These include retirement, bereavement, loss of sense of purpose, fewer opportunities to socialise and finances.
  • Around 4 in 5 of those who are at increasing risk of harm from alcohol said that on no occasion had relatives, friends, doctors or other health workers been concerned about their drinking or suggested they cut down.
  • 1 in 4 said they would not tell anyone if they needed help.


Julie Breslin, Drink Wise, Age Well Programme Lead said:

“One positive from the Drink Wise, Age Well study is that 80% of those surveyed who drink, are drinking at lower risk levels. However, of those who are drinking at more risky levels the majority have never had anyone, including health professionals, talk to them about their alcohol use. Also a quarter of people would not know where to go for help nor would they ask if they needed it. Thanks to support from the Big Lottery Fund, Drink Wise, Age Well is working to tackle the stigma around alcohol use in the over 50s population and do this through raising awareness, training frontline staff to ‘ask the question’ and ensuring appropriate help is available to those when they do look for it.”

Baroness Sally Greengross from the International Longevity Centre - UK said:

“This report gives us an opportunity to start putting some wrongs to rights in relation to older adults and alcohol. We are all living longer lives; however, it is vital to ensure this is a life of quality and good health. If the number of people that are drinking at increasing risk levels continue this into later life there may be some serious impacts both on their own health and at a societal level. At a policy level we need to create a climate where sensible drinking is considered within the wider scope of healthy ageing and longevity.”

David McCullough, Royal Voluntary Service Chief Executive said:

“What this report gives rise to are some concerning characteristics in relation to higher risk drinkers. More often than not, they are not in a relationship and live alone, and have a longstanding illness or disability. 1 in 3 higher risk drinkers cite being down or depressed as a reason for drinking and 41% say they drink because they are lonely or bored. Tackling social isolation among older people is a key commitment of Royal Voluntary service and this report highlights that we need to be much more vigilant and aware of the potential for high risk drinking in a population that are more isolated. We are delighted to be partners of the Drink Wise, Age Well programme so we can tackle this together.”

Drink Wise, Age Well is supported by the Big Lottery Fund as part of Rethink Good Health, a £25 million UK-wide programme to inform policy and practice UK-wide in preventing alcohol misuse amongst older people, specifically those aged 50 and over. It works in five areas to help prevent harm caused by alcohol in the over 50s, promote alternatives to alcohol in communities, build skills in communities to help at risk over 50s and seeks to get the issue on the health agenda.

-ENDS-

Drink Wise Age Well media contact:
Steve Williams, Communications and Public Affairs:
Tel: 0141 221 8390 steven.williams@addaction.org.uk

Addaction press office: 020 7017 2747
Out of hours: 07818 587696


Notes to Editors:

  • The AUDIT Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test identifies three categories of drinker:

o LOWER RISK: This group is defined as: AUDIT score of 0-7 Or: Men who regularly drink 3-4 units per day. Women who regularly drink 2-3 units per day. This group is defined as ‘lower risk’ rather than ‘no risk, as evidence is accumulating that no level of alcohol use is without risk entirely. This is particularly true for older adults.
o INCREASING RISK DRINKERS This group is defined as: AUDIT score of 8-15 or Men who regularly drink more than 3 to 4 units a day, but less than the higher risk levels. Women who regularly drink more than 2 to 3 units a day, but less than the higher risk levels.
o HIGHER RISK DRINKERS This group is defined as: AUDIT score of 16+ or Men who regularly drink more than 8 units a day or more than 50 units of alcohol per week. (5 bottles of wine or 20 pints)
Women who regularly drink more than 6 units a day or more than 35 units of alcohol per week. (14 pints lager or 3 ½ bottles of wine)

  • Drink Wise, Age Well will be delivered over a seven year period by a consortium led overall by Addaction and in Northern Ireland by Addiction Northern Ireland, and including Royal Voluntary Service, International Longevity Centre UK and Drug and Alcohol Charities Wales. The programme will be evaluated by an academic team led by the University of Bedfordshire’s Substance Misuse and Ageing Research Team (SMART).
     
  • Each partner will take the lead in a demonstration area:
    Western Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland: Addiction Northern Ireland (contact Director Thelma Abernethy or Locality Manager Joanne Smith )
    Cwm Taf Wales: Drug Aid (Director, Caroline Phipps or Locality Manager Richard Broadway )
    Devon County, England:  Addaction (Contact Clare Pawley)
    Sheffield City, England : Royal Voluntary Service- (Contact Emma Wells )
    Glasgow City, Scotland: Addaction (Contact Graeme Callander )
    Research and Evaluation: Sarah Wadd, SMART who will lead a UK wide academic team
    Policy- Sally Bamford. ILC-UK

    • The Big Lottery Fund supports the aspirations of people who want to make life better for their communities across the UK. It is responsible for giving out 40% of the money raised by the National Lottery and invests over £650 million a year in projects big and small in health, education, environment and charitable purposes.
    Since June 2004 it has awarded over £8 billion to projects that change the lives of millions of people. Every year it funds 13,000 small local projects tackling big social problems like poor mental health and homelessness.

    Since the National Lottery began in 1994, £34 billion has been raised and more than 450,000 grants awarded.

Ends//


All of us at the International Longevity Centre – UK would like to wish you a very happy and prosperous New Year. We would also like to take this opportunity to introduce the latest member of our Partners Programme, Hymans Robertson LLP. After many years of close collaboration, we are delighted to welcome Hymans Robertson, a leading independent pensions consultancy, as Partners.

Emma McWilliam, Senior Life Consulting Actuary at Hymans Robertson said:

'Hymans Robertson is delighted to join ILC-UK's Partners Programme. Whilst living a long age is to be celebrated, longevity causes challenges for pension schemes, insurers and society at large.

We look forward to improving awareness and understanding of how best to manage longevity, as well as contributing to the shaping of bespoke products and services to meet our aim of enabling certain financial futures.

Our leading developments such as Club Vita, one of the richest longevity datasets of its kind, and Guided Outcomes, an award-winning innovation to help pensioners achieve their retirement goals, will allow us to contribute valuable insights and help deliver the solutions needed to tackle the issues of demographic change'.

They will now join Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti Paymaster, Legal & General, Partnership, Prudential and Retirement Advantage in being the first to receive new original research; in interacting with policy makers, opinion formers and prospective clients; and in having the ILC-UK team at their disposal to discuss policy and research developments.

You can read about the advantages of joining our Partners Programme in our new brochure. The price of corporate membership quoted as coming into effect from January 2016 has now been postponed until 1st April 2016.

Click to read our new Partners Programme brochure

For any questions about the programme, please contact David Sinclair at davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk

ILC-UK publishes new analysis to feed into FCA and HM Treasury Financial Advice Market Review


Ensuring policy and practice raises confidence in the provision of advice is key to increasing uptake, argues the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) in their submission to the Financial Advice Market Review (FAMR).


The ILC-UK has undertaken new analysis of the Wealth and Assets Survey (WAS) (1) to feed into their submission. The analysis finds that:

 

  • Approximately 18.2 million people took out a financial product in the last two years, with nearly 3.1 million investing in risky assets.
  • Among the 43.5% who have taken out a financial product in the last two years, approximately 1 in 10 (11.2%) had been influenced by an Independent Financial Adviser. In terms of overall population, this is equivalent to approximately 2 million people.
  • Worryingly, 2.7 million people took out a financial product in the last two years without collecting any information at all.

The ILC-UK reveal that best buy comparison websites most influenced decisions about which product to take out, followed by information from providers.  In making product decisions:

  • 6.1 million people were influenced by “Best buy information, comparison website or shopped around a lot of different sources”;
  • Approximately 2 million were influenced by an “Independent Financial Adviser”;
  • Roughly 3.9 million were influenced by “Information collected from providers or providers websites”;
  • About 1.7 million were influenced by friends or family;

The ILC-UK analysis reveals that older (age 55+) consumers are significantly more likely to influenced by IFAs or providers, than by best buy information on websites.

Consumers who indicated IFAs as the most trustworthy source for retirement income advice, were significantly more likely to have been influenced by an IFA when choosing to take out a financial product.

Homeowners are also significantly more likely to be influenced by an IFA when choosing to take out a financial product. While only 1 in 16 renters (who have taken out a financial product) are likely to be influenced by an IFA, the proportion rises to 1 in 8 for homeowners.

There is greater awareness of the value of IFAs amongst those purchasing potentially risky investments. (2) ILC-UK find that the proportion of people influenced by IFAs doubles for people buying these products.

Consumers who are most financially able, i.e. those who report that they know exactly how much they have in their bank account, are also more likely to choose DIY financial solutions, by surfing best buy websites or shopping around.

The number of people not collecting any information or just relying on friends and family before taking out a financial product is large – about 4.4 million. Among them, older consumers (aged 75 plus) tend to be over-represented.

ILC-UK point out that those who are burdened by debt do not reach out. Among consumers who felt burdened by debt (approximately 17% of the sample), only about 1 in 8 (or 12.7%) received any advice at all to help them deal with their debts, and among them, 3 in 5 received advice from a free agency.

Cesira Urzì Brancati, Research fellow at the ILC-UK said:

The demand for independent financial advice is mainly driven by trust. We will not expand access to advice without action to raise trust in advice.

Sadly, advice too often does not reach those who need it the most. For some, however, overconfidence is an impediment to getting advice.

Making financial advice mandatory may not have good results. Experimental evidence from the US showed that unsolicited advice has no effect on investment behaviour – only those who want advice and ask for it will act accordingly.[1]

Our research highlights again the importance of Government and industry supporting a mid retirement financial health check. We need to ensure that people making important financial decisions in their 70s and beyond, get the support they need”.

On 1st December, the ILC-UK published Understanding Retirement Journeys, a report, supported by Prudential, which explored consumption in later life. In the report, ILC-UK called for the introduction of a mass market mid-retirement financial health check and financial advice. The Think Tank also called for the development of new rules of thumb to be built into the financial guidance process.(3)

Contact

Ben Franklin (benfranklin@ilcuk.org.uk) or Cesira Urzì Brancati (CesiraUrziBrancati@ilcuk.org.uk) at ILC-UK on 02073400440

Notes
1) The ILC-UK analysis takes advantage of the largest and most comprehensive source of information on income, wealth and assets in Great Britain, the Wealth and Assets Survey (WAS). The WAS is a longitudinal survey, which means that the same individuals are followed over time, and it is representative of all private households in Great Britain. For the purpose of our analyses, we focus on the latest wave, i.e. data collected between 2010 and 2012, and we keep only individuals aged 16+ who completed the entire interview. We are, therefore, left with a remarkably large sample of 37,601 observations.

2) By investments we mean an equity ISA, PEP, unit trust or investment trust, investment bond, stocks and shares or an endowment policy that was not linked to a mortgage.

3) See http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/news/news_posts/press_release_researcg_busts_the_myth_of_a_hedonistic_retiree_population
The ILC-UK response to the FCA and HM Treasury Financial Advice Market Review will be published on the ILC-UK website on 18th December 2015.
The International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. It develops ideas, undertakes research and creates a forum for debate.

Press Release

Embargo: 00:01 Saturday 12 December 2015

The end of formal adult social care?

  • UK heading towards the bottom of OECD league table for spending on care as proportion of GDP.
  • Local authorities with the highest concentration of older people and with highest reliance on unpaid informal caring will perversely be able to raise least from the Council Tax Precept announced in the Spending Review.
  • Lack of investment will lead to growing reliance on informal carers with significant economic and social implications.

Detailed analysis of the social care funding measures outlined in the Spending Review reveals a bleak future for older people needing care.

The new research published by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) Centre for Later Life Funding and supported by Age UK, reveals:

  • Approximately 1.86 million people over the age of 50 in England (1 in 10) have unmet care needs – an increase of 120,000 people (or 7%) since 2008/9.
  • Data from 326 local authorities shows that the councils with the highest concentration of older people and unpaid carers will be the ones that will bring in the least amount of money from the 2% council tax precept.
  • There are approximately 4.3 million people aged 50+ in England who are living alone (that’s roughly 1 in 5 middle aged and older people living on their own).

ILC-UK point out that even if the Spending Review announcements bring £3.5bn into adult social care, a scenario they describe as “highly unlikely”, this will still only mean that spending on care returns to 2015 levels by the end of the Parliament. This level of funding would imply an overall fall in expenditure on care as a proportion of GDP putting us firmly towards the bottom end of the OECD league table.


The think tank argues that the low level of funding offered is likely to result in a polarisation of care – private formal care for those that can afford it, rising reliance on informal carers and increasing unmet needs for those that can’t.

The end of formal adult social care” points out that the numbers accessing care services have fallen by half a million since 2008/9 (a drop of 30%) despite a growing ageing population. The number of over 80s have risen by 800,000 in the last decade. The provocation notes that there are already around 1.5 million people providing over 50 hours per week of unpaid care and that without investment the need for informal care will increase.


ILC-UK highlight that increasing pressures on unpaid carers will have a significant economic impact, preventing more people from continuing in work. They argue that the UK does not have the required infrastructure to move to a model of care that relies so heavily on family and community support and that if this were to happen, significant extra investment would be needed. Without greater support, both financial and in terms of more formal care support, greater unpaid caring could risk an erosion in the quality of care provided.  


Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing society at ILC-UK warned:

“The future for adult social care looks bleak.


The social care settlement will be insufficient to meet the growing care needs of an ageing population and does little more than paper over the cracks which many of those who are in need of care are already falling through.

While some will be able to rely on family to support their needs, increased prevalence of unpaid caring may have adverse consequences for those providing support, for the economy as a whole due to reduced employment, and without additional investment may even lead to an erosion in the quality of care provided.”

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director of Age UK said:


"This report reinforces the consensus among experts that the measures the Government ‎announced in the Spending Review will not be enough to arrest the further decline of social care in this country.


"As such it is a wake-up call for the public, women especially, because they make up most family carers. Over the last twenty years the need to provide a system of childcare has been‎ first recognised and then at least partially met, in order to enable more women to work and support decent family incomes. Now many of those same women, or sometimes their mothers, could find they have to leave work to care for their own ageing parents, because we are effectively dismantling our system of social care. This is the wrong political and economic choice and it will hurt older people and their families."

Notes


On Saturday 12th December, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), will publish its analysis of the implications of the 2015 Autumn Spending Review on adult social care. (www.ilcuk.org.uk)


The provocation, “the end of formal adult social care” was supported by Age UK.


ILC-UK is the country’s leading think tank impacting policy on longevity, ageing and population change.


This report is the second publication from The Centre for Later Life Funding, which in turn, sits under the guise of the ILC-UK. The Centre is, in part, a continuation of its predecessor body the Care Funding Advice Network (CFAN) – a coalition of organisations and individuals seeking to improve on the Care Act’s recognition of the need for financial advice.


The Centre represents a significant expansion in terms of scope and output to include policy briefings and research papers, which consider not just questions about care funding but questions about funding retirement more broadly. And critically, it is focused on developing ideas and solutions to these questions. We think that the artificial separation of retirement funding from care funding is unhelpful given that long-term care can be one of the biggest costs that people face during their retirement years.


Contact


David Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk). 02073400440 or 07531164886.


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Press Release

Embargoed 00.01 1st December 2015

Research busts the myth of a hedonistic retiree population

•        Retirees are saving £48.7bn per year
•        Rather than spending their kids inheritance on holidays and leisure, older people spend decreasing amounts on non-essentials
•        On average retirees think they have a 70% chance of leaving an inheritance of £50,000 or more

New research by the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) and Prudential busts the myth of older people splashing their retirement cash on leisure and holidays. The report reveals that from the age of 50 onwards, spending on most non-essential items begins a slow decline. With the exception of early retirement, retirement does not lead to more holidays or other leisure activities. Nor does retirement lead to a sudden splurge in eating out.

Understanding Retirement Journeys, published today in conjunction with Prudential presents findings of detailed research into what retirement is really like.

The report finds:

Consumption falls during retirement: A household headed by someone aged 80 and over spends, on average, 43% less than a household headed by a 50 year old.

Many older households continue saving throughout retirement. Individuals aged 80 and over are saving, on average, around £5,870 per year. ILC-UK calculate total per annum savings made by those in retirement in the UK today of around £48.7bn. This equates to 2.8% of GDP. The majority of savings made by older people are sitting in low interest current accounts. On average, retirees think they have a 70% chance of leaving an inheritance of £50,000 or more. 

Contrary to popular perceptions, retirement does not lead to more holidays. However as we age, time at home alone increases while time spent with family and friends falls. By age 90+, watching television and spending time at home alone are the most common daily activities.

Health appears to restrict an increasing proportion of older people from doing the things they want to do in retirement. However, the vast majority of retirees say that they are able to do the things they want. Even by age 90+, 65% of the population say they can do the things they want “often” or “sometimes”.

ILC-UK argue that excess savings in retirement could have adverse macroeconomic implications, pointing to excess savings relative to investment in Japan which has acted as a drag on economic growth. The think tank argues that if older people are saving, “we need to find effective ways of putting those savings to good use to help drive economic growth”.

In the report ILC-UK call for:

• The introduction of a mass market mid-retirement financial health check and financial advice
• The development of new rules of thumb, based on evidence in this report and others which can be built into the financial guidance process
To respond to high savings levels by older people, ILC-UK argue that:
• The financial services industry should consider how it can help retirees maximise customers’ returns on these savings.
• The Government should develop a long-term strategy to harness the savings made by retirees to deliver increased investment and drive forward economic output.

Given the reality of consumption falls in retirement, ILC-UK argue that typical decumulation strategies might reasonably prioritise flexible retirement income in the initial retirement period to help support consumption followed by secure income in later life to ensure people don’t run out of money before the end of their life.   

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing at ILC-UK said:

“In light of the pension freedoms, there has been much speculation about consumption needs in retirement and the types of retirement income products that might be required to meet these needs.
Our research points to evidence of a “default retirement consumption path” where consumption falls lead to savings in later life. This implies people may need a combination of flexibility and security of income in retirement to support higher consumption earlier on while ensuring people are still able to afford their regular bills in later life.
Striking the right balance between flexibility and security will not be an easy task and will require financial guidance and advice throughout retirement.”


Tim Fassam, Head of Public Affairs at Prudential UK added: 

“The research findings provide an insight into retirees’ actual behaviour that is unexpected yet thought provoking. By having a greater understanding of spending patterns in retirement, the rate at which older people save and their hopes to leave an inheritance, it becomes easier to help them plan financially for retirement.
“It points to financial advice being equally important in the latter stages of retirement as at the start, and of the need for our industry to focus beyond the point at which someone retires.”


Notes

Understanding Retirement Journeys provides detailed analyses of two large datasets: 1) the Living Costs and Food Survey, which enables us to gain insights into income and expenditure patterns of the older population, and 2) the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, which allows us to explore what people are actually doing in their daily lives and whether they are content with this.

Understanding Retirement Journeys will be published on 1st December on the ILC-UK website. Advanced Copies are available for journalists.

Understanding retirement Journeys will be launched at an event hosted by Prudential on Tuesday 1st December. Details of the event are here http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/what_is_retirement_really_like

Contact

David Sinclair davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk or Dave Eaton daveeaton@ilcuk.org.uk at ILC-UK 02073400440 or 07531164886

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Press Notice

For Immediate Release

23 November 2015

Think tank urges government and business to maximise economic benefit of ageing

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) will tomorrow host their first UK Future of Ageing Conference. The conference will paint a picture of the future of ageing and explore the challenges and opportunities ahead.

Speaking ahead of the event, ILC-UK Director, David Sinclair said “Ageing could offer huge rewards to UK plc if we can ensure more of us age healthily. The UK will benefit if we can maximise the employment of older workers and if we better respond to the demands of the older consumer.

This week’s spending review will undoubtedly focus on the immediate challenges of funding health and social care. But it is also key that we start planning not just for increased costs associated with an ageing society, but also to ensure that we maximise the current and future economic contribution of older people.”

Last week, ahead of the conference, a group of national and international businesses pledged to “work over the next five years to help make our ageing society and economy more sustainable” (1).

Confirmed speakers at the Future of Ageing Conference include:

• Baroness Altmann (Minister for Pensions);
• Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science);
• Lord Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]);
• Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change);
• Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
• Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership);
• Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council);
• Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson);
• Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust)
• Elaine Draper (Director, Accessibility & Inclusion, Barclays)
• Mario Ambrosi (Head of Communications and Public Affairs, Anchor)
• Baroness Kay Andrews (Member of the House of Lords Built Environment Committee, Former Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) 2006-2009)

The conference will explore five key areas:

• The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society.

• The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty.

• The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing.

• The future of our built environment in an ageing society.

• The future of ageing research.

Following the conference, ILC-UK will publish a Future of Ageing Report.

Notes

1. See: Ageing poses risk to UK economy argue business leaders http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/news/news_posts/press_release_ageing_poses_risk_to_uk_economy_argue_business_leaders

200 delegates will attend the first Future of Ageing conference on Tuesday, 24th November 2015; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 17:00; 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

ILC-UK will be tweeting from the event using the hashtag #futureofageing

Contact

David Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk). 02073400440 or 07531164886.

If you do not wish to receive future press notices from ILC-UK, please respond with “UNSUBSCRIBE” in the subject header.


Companies pledge to lead the way in tackling the challenges of demographic change

A group of major national and international companies have signed an open letter and pledged to “work over the next five years to help make our ageing society and economy more sustainable”.

In the letter, the companies point out that “without action, our ageing society poses a risk to the UK economy and our business''. 

The businesses highlight that demographic change today means that we are “already witnessing shortages in critical parts of our economy“.

Whilst on the one hand, the business leaders recognise the potential of older consumers. They highlight that too few people are saving enough to have a good retirement. They also point out that having a healthy workforce will be key to addressing the UK productivity, yet point out that more investment in healthy ageing needs to be made.

The businesses signing the letter argue that “action by all of us over the next five years could make the UK a world leader.”

They point out that “companies have a big part to play in tackling the challenges of demographic change.  We can create jobs for all ages. We can help our workforce age well. And we can ensure our products and services are relevant for all.”

Next week, government, industry and voluntary sector experts will come together at the first national Future of Ageing Conference. The conference, organised by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) will seek to kick start a debate on the role companies have to play in helping us adapt to demographic change.

Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, ILC-UK Chief Executive said: “Businesses must play a significant role in helping us adapt to our ageing society. They need to create jobs for all ages, help UK plc improve its productivity and help people to plan better for their retirement. Businesses who grasp the demographic opportunity will reap significant financial rewards. Older consumers have significant purchasing power and reaping this potential will offer economic returns. It is in all of our interests that more businesses engage with the challenges and opportunities of demographic change”.

Jane Ashcroft CBE, CEO of housing and care provider Anchor said: "We must stop seeing our ageing society as a cost. Older workers can bring wisdom and experience in the same way older consumers are fuelling our economy. We have to act now to ensure a positive future for the older people of tomorrow."

Shaun Crawford, Global Insurance Sector Leader at EY: “EY fully endorses the critical role businesses have in creating and sustaining healthy workforces that deliver the benefits for employers, individuals and communities. EY’s own research has clearly established the link between wellbeing, productivity and performance. Taking care of physical and psychological health is critical to enjoying life;working at older ages to sustain household incomes and as longevity continues to increase, improving the proportion of this extended life in good rather than in poor health.”

Steve Groves, Chief Executive Officer, Partnership said: "Partnership is pleased to add its support to the ILC-UK led pledge to work towards helping make our ageing society and economy more sustainable. The challenges associated with demographic change are significant and it is important that these are addressed as a priority. With an ever growing older population, with few saving enough for a good retirement, it is essential that more is done to encourage and stimulate a pensions savings culture and equip people with the skills and interest to engage more in the process."

Gary Shaughnessy, CEO of Zurich UK Life, said: “Increasing life expectancy and chronic under-saving could leave many people facing a shortfall in retirement. The insurance industry is rising to the challenge by encouraging more people to save and developing new products that support them in later life. The Government also has a role to play by fostering a stable pensions system that incentivises long-term saving."

Douglas Anderson, Partner at Hymans Robertson and Founder of Club Vita, said  “Attitudes around the age at which we retire are turning on their head. The mass ‘early retirement’ programmes of the 1980s and 1990s are likely to be confined to the annals of history. Average life spans have increased by around four years since then. Importantly, there is growing evidence of the health benefits of working longer - and into what is currently considered ‘retirement age’ but in the future may not. Club Vita data shows that those who begin drawing pensions at 70 live a year longer than those retiring at 60. Gradual work-to-retirement transitions, instead of a clean break, look increasingly sensible to employers as well as employees. Employers should respond accordingly and make it easier for employees to phase down working avoiding a later retirement cliff edge. This would improve productivity, staff engagement and crucially also help prevent career blockages for younger generations keen to move through the ranks.”

Gary Day from McCarthy & Stone, the UK’s leading retirement housebuilder, said: “The population is ageing rapidly but the UK’s housing stock is not suitable to cope with this change. There is a lack of choice when older people come to move to properties that are designed for them in later life. This impacts negatively on a range of areas – poorer well-being, higher public spending on health and care, and blocked housing chains. We need to raise our focus beyond starter homes and greatly encourage the building of more retirement properties and housing suitable for older people across all tenures.”

Fiona Dunsire, Chief Executive Officer, Mercer said: “Mercer’s Age Friendly Employer Research showed only a fraction of companies have implemented ‘age friendly’ policies to help them retain and attract older workers. Tactics like age-specific wellness programmes, reviews of pay equity across comparable jobs across age bands, age discrimination checks, training targeted at older workers and line manager training are still only offered by a handful of employers. Employers need to be doing more to develop corporate policies that allow their business to tap into this talent pool. We strongly advocate that companies investigate their workforce planning need to establish the extent of the impact of an ageing society on their businesses.”

Martin Jones, Chief Operating Officer at Home Instead Senior Care, a UK national homecare provider which specialises in care for older people, said: “We are already committed to creating jobs for all ages. We have CAREGivers in their 50s, 60s and 70s whose life experience make them brilliant assets for our business which delivers relationship-led homecare for the UK's ageing population. We simply do not see age as a barrier to a career in care with us and we provide ongoing training to promote personal development, no matter what a person's stage in life."

Bruce Moore, Chief Executive of Housing & Care 21, said: “As a specialist provider of housing and care services for older people, we can see clearly the challenges that an ageing population presents to society, and the different ways in which we can work together to meet these challenges and make sure people can continue to enjoy healthy and active lifestyles in later life. We must also not lose sight of the contribution older people can continue to make to our society, given the right opportunities and support.”

Rachael Saunders, Age at Work Director, Business in the Community said “More and more employers are making the most of the increasing asset of skilled, knowledge able and networked people that longer working lives offer. Making the most of this asset does mean changing how workplaces operate – responsible businesses are leading the way”.

Colin Taylor, Chief Executive Officer, Key Retirement said: “As an organisation focussed on the financial wellbeing of our older population we wholeheartedly support this initiative by ILC-UK. As a company who specialises in financial advice and support for the over 55s we fully understand the importance of ensuring that as our society ages we must continue to innovate and provide financial solutions which give both genuine and tangible values to the wider ageing population.”

Signatories to the letter and pledge are:

Jane Ashcroft, Chief Executive, Anchor

Andy Briggs, CEO, Aviva UK Life

Nick Sanderson, Chief Executive Officer, Audley Retirement

Rachael Saunders, Age at Work Director, Business in the Community

Shaun Crawford, Global Insurance Sector Leader, EY

Jilly Forster, Chair, Forster Communications

Bruce Moore, Chief Executive, Housing and Care 21

Douglas Anderson, Partner at Hymans Robertson & Founder of Club Vita

Martin Jones, Chief Operating Officer, Home Instead Senior Care

Stephen Lowe, Group Director, Just Retirement

Colin Taylor, Chief Executive Officer, Key Retirement

Fiona Dunsire, Chief Executive Officer, Mercer

Gary Day, Land and Planning Director, McCarthy and Stone

Andrew Rear, Chairman, Munich Re UK Services

Steve Groves, Chief Executive Officer, Partnership

Phil Loney, Group Chief Executive, Royal London

Romana Abdin, Chief Executive for Simplyhealth

Gary Shaughnessy, UK Chief Executive Officer, Zurich Insurance plc

Denise Keating, Chief Executive of The Employers Network for Equality and Inclusion,
and Chair of the Age Action Alliance Healthy Workplaces Group.

Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk). Tel 02073400440

Notes to editor

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) has organised the first “future of ageing” conference to take place on November 24th. During this event, signatories to the letter and the ILC-UK pledge will debate the role of business in responding to the challenges of ageing.

Other speakers at the event include Baroness Altmann (Minister for Pensions); Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science); Lord Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]); Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change); Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership); Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council); Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson);  Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust); Elaine Draper (Director, Accessibility & Inclusion, Barclays); Mario Ambrosi (Head of Communications and Public Affairs, Anchor); and Baroness Kay Andrews (Member of the House of Lords Built Environment Committee, Former Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) 2006-2009)

The pledge

We will work over the next five years to help make our ageing society and economy more sustainable.

The Open Letter

Our ageing society is of significant importance to UK plc. Without action, our ageing society poses a risk to the UK economy and our business. But action by all of us over the next five years could make the UK a world leader.

Companies have a big part to play in tackling the challenges of demographic change. We can create jobs for all ages. We can help our workforce age well. And we can ensure our products and services are relevant for all.

As business leaders we have a vested interest. We need skilled workers yet are already witnessing shortages in critical parts of our economy.

We know that a healthy workforce will be a vital part of addressing the UK productivity puzzle as our society ages yet society invests too little in healthy ageing.

We want tomorrow’s older consumers active in the economy yet savings levels are not likely to be adequate to allow many to enjoy the active retirement they want.

Next week, government, industry and voluntary sector experts will come together at the first national Future of Ageing Conference. The conference will kick start a debate on the role companies have to play in helping us adapt to demographic change.

As a group of companies, we will work with policymakers and key stakeholders the over the next five years, to make our ageing society and economy more sustainable. We urge other companies to join with us.

Jane Ashcroft, Chief Executive, Anchor

Andy Briggs, CEO, Aviva UK Life

Nick Sanderson, Chief Executive Officer, Audley Retirement

Rachael Saunders, Age at Work Director, Business in the Community

Shaun Crawford, Global Insurance Sector Leader, EY

Jilly Forster, Chair, Forster Communications

Bruce Moore, Chief Executive, Housing and Care 21

Douglas Anderson, Partner at Hymans Robertson & Founder of Club Vita

Martin Jones, Chief Operating Officer, Home Instead Senior Care

Stephen Lowe, Group Director, Just Retirement

Colin Taylor, Chief Executive Officer, Key Retirement

Fiona Dunsire, Chief Executive Officer, Mercer

Gary Day, Land and Planning Director, McCarthy and Stone

Andrew Rear, Chairman, Munich Re UK Services

Steve Groves, Chief Executive Officer, Partnership

Phil Loney, Group Chief Executive, Royal London

Romana Abdin, Chief Executive for Simplyhealth

Gary Shaughnessy, UK Chief Executive Officer Zurich Insurance plc

Care sector faces crisis as huge new care workforce gap revealed
 

The adult social care sector in England faces a gap of 200,000 care workers by the end of this Parliament because of restrictions on immigration and a failure to attract British workers. Longer term, the sector could face a shortfall of 1 million workers in the next twenty years.  That’s according to new research from Independent Age, the older people’s charity, and the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK).

The ground-breaking report - Moved to Care - maps the size, shape and scope of the care workforce in England and warns of the impact of recent restrictions on migration and a continued failure to attract more UK born workers to social care.

Other key findings in the report - based on analysis of population figures from the Office for National Statistics and workforce data from the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care - include:

  • 1 in 5 of the adult social care workforce (18.4%) in England was born outside of the United Kingdom, which includes 150,000 working in residential care homes and 81,000 working in adult domiciliary care
  • Non-EU migrants account for the greatest proportion of migrants working in adult social care – approximately 1 in every 7 care workers (191,000 people)
  • Greater London is particularly reliant on migrant care workers with nearly 3 in 5 of its adult social care workforce (59%) born abroad
  • For the most recent migrant workers joining the social care sector, the top five countries of birth are India, Poland, the Philippines, Romania and Nigeria
  • Approximately 1.45 million people work in the adult social care sector in England, but it is already struggling to recruit and retain staff.  Nearly 1 in 20 (4.8%) of positions in adult social care in England are currently vacant – nearly twice the vacancy rate in UK’s labour force as a whole (2.6%). The Care Quality Commission recently warned of the effect of staff shortages on the safety and quality of social care provision

At the same time, a rapidly ageing population and significant cuts to social care funding are placing the sector under immense pressure.  The number of people aged over 80 is expected to double in size to over 5 million by 2037 and social care funding has been reduced by nearly 11% in the last five years.

Independent Age and ILC-UK are calling for action to both attract more UK-born workers to the care sector and make it easier for social care providers to recruit from overseas. The report sets out the changes that could help reduce the workforce gap, including:
 
  • Investing in training, apprenticeships and career development to make adult social care an attractive career choice for UK born workers
  • Adding highly skilled roles in the adult social care sector - such as therapist and social worker - to the Shortage Occupation List, making them easier for employers to recruit from overseas
  • Allow low-skilled migrant workers to enter the social care workforce by opening up the Tier 3 visa route

Simon Bottery, Director of Policy at Independent Age, said:

“Without action, there is a real risk of care services worsening as providers fail to fill job vacancies and staff struggle to cope with increasing demand. That can only be bad news for the older people who rely on these services to carry out basic tasks like eating and dressing''.

“We need to recognise the current reliance of social care on migrant workers and make it easier for them to work here but also look to the sector’s longer-term future.  The government must use the upcoming Spending Review to invest in social care so it can attract more UK workers, while at the same time exploring new ways of caring for our ageing population in the future.”

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing at ILC-UK, said:

“Enabling migrant workers to fill workforce gaps is one part of the solution, but it is no silver bullet. We ensure that the sector is able to attract more UK and foreign born workers alike.

“This will require a substantive shift in the direction of policy as well as a change in public perceptions about what working in care is like. The alternative will be a degradation in the quality of care and an increasing reliance on family carers. If this is the future, it will have dire implications for those needing care, their family members and the wider economy.”


Notes to editor
 
  • Projections of population growth and net migration levels are taken from Office for National Statistics Population Projections
  • Information on the size, make-up and vacancy rate of the current adult social care workforce is taken from the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care, based on a 2015 survey of providers
  • Most recent migrant workers’ refers to migrants workers who arrived in the UK from 2007 to 2014
  • Care Quality Commission: The state of health care and adult social care in England (2014/15)
  • Association of Directors of Adult Social Services: ADASS Budget Survey 2015

Welcome to the October edition of the ILC-UK Update

Since our last update, ILC-UK has published four new reports, and ILC-UK research has also frequently been cited in the press. Our report 'Rethinking Cancer', which quantified the cost of cancer to the UK economy was cited in The Metro and The Independent, and our work with the Ready for Ageing Alliance dispelling the ‘Myth of the Baby Boomers’ featured in four articles in the Telegraph, two in The Guardian, and also enjoyed attention in The Independent and The Times.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our Linkedin Group.
 

Downing Street Reception for Baroness Sally Greengross’ 80th Birthday

In September we were honoured to be hosted by Samantha Cameron at 10 Downing Street for a drinks reception in celebration of Baroness Greengross' 80th birthday. We were delighted to be joined by a number of our Partners, colleagues, friends and supporters, and to have had an opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to addressing the challenges of ageing in such a prestigious location.

To read more about the reception, please click here.


ILC-UK Publications

Creating a Sustainable 21st Century Healthcare System

The first report in the SOS 2020 Health series examines how the NHS can achieve its planned £22bn efficiency savings, and calls for the health service to be supported to continue to invest in innovation in order to save money in the long-term.

Village Life
Funded by Audley Retirement and Bupa, this report has found that extra care housing can have a major impact in promoting residents' quality of life and reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Rethinking Cancer
'Rethinking Cancer' quantifies the cost of cancer to the UK economy, its families and its communities. The report considers the wider cost of cancer alongside the 160,000 deaths it causes each year in the UK.

The Myth of the Baby Boomer
This report seeks to bust the widely touted myth that there is a uniform group of older people in the UK – so called baby boomers – who have benefitted at the expense of younger age groups.


ILC-UK Events

The Future of Ageing: ILC-UK 2015 Conference
Tuesday, 24th November 2015; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start); 17:00
20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

You are invited to attend the ILC-UK Conference, The Future of Ageing, on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London.

During the conference, we will paint a picture of the future of ageing and explore the challenges and opportunities ahead. Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explore the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrows.

We are delighted to confirm the following speakers:

  • Baroness Altmann (Minister of Pensions)
  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science)
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies)
  • Professor Jane Elliot (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council)
  • Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change)
  • Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People's Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust)
  • Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership)
  • Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson)
  • David Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills])
  • Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust)
  • Elaine Draper (Director, Accessibility & Inclusion, Barclays)
  • Baroness Kay Andrews (Member of the House of Lords Built Environment Committee, Former Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) 2006-2009)

£200+VAT - Charity / Not for Profit / Students / Lecturers / Individuals
£275+VAT - Corporate

The Future of Ageing - Book your place here.


We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and Partnership for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference, and Lipreading Practice for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day.
                                       
                                                                                            
                                           
                                            
 
We are still accepting further sponsorship for the conference and packages include:

  • Exhibition space
  • Advertisement space in the conference brochure
  • Promotional materials in delegate packs


We are also happy to work with organisations to create bespoke packages. Please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440 for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.
 

The Impact of the Spending Review on Later Life Funding

Thursday 26th November 2015, 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 10:30; House of Lords, London, SW1A 0PW
An Age UK and ILC-UK debate

The Spending Review, due to be published on 25th November 2015 will set out the Governments plans to deliver additional departmental savings with a view to eliminating Britain’s deficit by 2019-2020.

Government Departments have been asked to model the impact of real term spending cuts of between 25% and 40%. At the same time some Departments have already been given an assurance that their spending will be protected. The Government has committed to invest in both the NHS and defence whilst also continuing to protect spending on education and foreign aid.

Because of the scale of cuts planned and the fact that some Departmental spending is protected, other Departments may face significant funding cuts.

This debate will examine the impact of the spending review on adult social care and later life funding, and will take place the morning after the Spending Review has been announced.

To register for this event, please click here.
Please note, due to security regulations at the House of Lords, anyone who has not pre-registered will not be permitted entrance.
 

Events in 2016

We have started working on our 2016 events calendar. If you or your organisation are interested in sponsoring an ILC-UK event in 2016, please contact our Office and Events Manager, Lyndsey Mitchell, on events@ilcuk.org.uk.

To keep up-to-date with ILC-UK events, please continue to check the ILC-UK website on a regular basis. Public events will also be advertised to our mailing list.

If you have received this newsletter via a colleague and are not currently registered on our mailing list, you can do so by emailing us at events@ilcuk.org.uk, or by entering your email address into the 'Join our mailing list' box at the top of this page.
 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our last newsletter we have posted blogs from a number of guest writers, ranging from the future of housing to the economic challenges of population ageing.

Paul Teverson from McCarthy & Stone highlighted the misconceptions held by some local authorities, which encourage them to pursue starter-home development at the expense of ensuring adequate provision of retirement properties. Paul explained how suitable retirement properties reduce demand for health and social care resources, and called for a more balanced and forward-thinking planning system.

Nick Sanderson from Audley responded to our Village Life report, and reiterated his support to promote alternatives to care homes. He noted how access to a retirement village with extra care provision can half the number of people over 80 with care needs being admitted to institutional care homes, and he called upon the Government to shift its focus from first time buyers and into providing adequate levels of retirement housing.

David Sinclair examined the Department for Transport’s 2014 National Travel Survey (England) and identified ten things it revealed about age and national travel. He also referred to our recent ‘Future of Transport in an Ageing Society’ report to highlight how transport is failing many older people, and considered how we can ensure the transport of the future responds to ageing.

A guest blog from Trevor Llanwarne, former Government Actuary introduced his new booklet ‘Greater Savings for Retirement’, which uses behavioural insights to suggest policies relevant to regulation, legislation and taxation.

Brian Please from Equiniti has written on how nothing takes away from the need for guaranteed levels of income in retirement, and the merits of annuities despite their poor press. He also cited Equniti's sixth Annual Retirement Survey, which has evidenced change and trends to the issues relating not only to annuities, but to all things retirement too.

David Sinclair and Ben Franklin also addressed personal finances as they wrote about how population ageing may lead to rising wages, before reminding us of the economic challenges ageing poses.

Yvonne Sonsino, Partner and Innovation Leader at Mercer contributed to our 'Future of Ageing' series ahead of our conference on the 24th November. She described how there are new rules of living longer (eleven of them to be precise), and explained how the future of ageing holds more challenges than ageing itself.

You can access the ILC-UK blog here; and the ILC Global Alliance blog here. If you would like to write a guest blog for us, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.
 

Working with ILC-UK

PARTNERS PROGRAMME
We have revamped our ILC-UK Partners programme. Membership is open to companies and not for profit organisations.

Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti Paymaster, Legal & General, Retirement Advantage, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk. We are increasing the cost of our Partners Programme for new members in the Autumn so please get in touch as soon as possible if you are interested in joining.

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is organising its first major all day conference on The Future of Ageing, on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Baroness Altmann (Minister or Pensions);
  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science);
  • David Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]);
  • Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change);
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
  • Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership);
  • Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council);
  • Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson); and
  • Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust) will be speaking at the conference.

The conference will be chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) and Lawrence Churchill (Trustee, ILC-UK).

ILC-UK are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and Partnership for their sponsorship of this conference.

Bookings can be made through the ILC-UK website.

 

On Tuesday 29th September, ILC-UK and a number of our Partners, colleagues, friends and supporters were honoured to be hosted by Samantha Cameron at 10 Downing Street, for a reception in celebration of Baroness Greengross’ 80th birthday.

Samantha Cameron spoke about the importance of ILC-UK’s work, and noted that the challenges posed by an ageing population will affect all of us. She highlighted some of the issues that Government and civil society must address now to ensure a sustainable future and a high quality of life for all in later age, and notably discussed the need to address dementia.

Baroness Greengross described the event as an early celebration of the UN’s International Older Peoples’ Day on the 1st October. She mentioned how serious illness in our 50’s and 60’s has fallen, more older people are choosing to work longer, and more people are saving.

She also outlined the challenges an ageing population poses, and joined Samantha Cameron in calling for a continued collaborative effort to address dementia. She took the opportunity to thank all those in attendance for the vital contribution and support they provide to ILC-UK, and invited everyone to look to the future at ILC-UK’s Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November.

The deadline for our discounted early bird rates for the ILC-UK 'Future of Ageing' conference is fast approaching.

To ensure your organisation is represented, and at the discounted rate, register before the end of Wednesday 30th September. Do feel free to circulate this information to colleagues within your organisation if you think they might be interested in attending the conference on the 24th November.

'The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference' will be held on Tuesday 24th November at 20 Cavendish Square in London. Book your space now.
Early bird rates will end on Wednesday, 30th September.

Click here to book your early bird ticket

If you miss this deadline, don't panic. Provided the conference is not at capacity, tickets will still be available, but at the higher rate.

 

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and Partnership for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day.

For more information about sponsorship opportunities, visit the ILC-UK website or contact Lyndsey Mitchell at ILC-UK on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

  • The UK is home to some of the world’s leading innovation in healthcare but we can learn from successes in USA, India, Australia, Africa and Europe
  • ILC-UK urge health leaders to work to ensure that the £22bn savings being asked of the NHS act to stimulate not prevent innovation

The NHS should be supported to continue to invest in innovation in order to save more money in the long-term argues a major new report ‘Creating a sustainable 21st century healthcare system’ by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK).

‘Creating a sustainable 21st century healthcare system’, sponsored by EY, is the first report in ILC-UK’s SOS 2020 Health series. It highlights how a ‘perfect storm’ of demographic and wider economic and social trends are converging to push up the cost of healthcare across the globe. The report showcases examples of innovation from across the world which could save lives and money if introduced more widely.

The UK’s healthcare system provides a third of the exemplary case studies showcased in the report, but the report suggests that more work needs to be done to share and spread innovation in the UK, and that there’s much to learn from other leading markets such as India, Australia, Europe and the US.

The report points out that the 15 million people who have a long term health condition account for 70% of the total health and care spend in England. Yet across Europe, on average only 3% of healthcare expenditure is allocated to prevention and public health programmes.

The NHS is committed to achieving £22bn efficiency savings through productivity gains of 2% or 3% a year between now and 2020. The ILC-UK research has shown this target will be very challenging without real innovation. The OBR highlight productivity in the health sector only rose by around 1% per annum on average between 1979 and 2010.
The report suggests that a concerted focus on innovation and prevention - developing more empowered health consumers, whilst also maximising the potential of big data - would help to deliver significant savings in the long-term.
Phase two of the report, due out in 2016, will model the impact of applying the leading global innovations showcased in the first report to new markets to highlight the potential global savings of sharing innovation.


Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive said “Whilst innovation can save money in the long term, it requires up-front investment. And the nature of introducing new or dual systems can mean that for the first few years costs go up and services don’t improve.
The picture is not as bleak as it may sound however. Advances in health technology have the potential to significantly influence patient’s access to health care and the way that health care is delivered. Big data can revolutionise the way services are focussed on the individual.

But for us to maximise the potential we have to create a climate for innovation in the health service. We might also accept that if we are to innovate to reduce costs and improve services over the long term, public and private investment is vital. Government must ensure that the £22bn savings being asked of the NHS act to stimulate not prevent innovation.”

Shaun Crawford, EY Global Insurance Sector Leader said  “‘The report  has sourced a bank of robust innovative global case studies that demonstrate the potential to deliver better health outcomes and reduce costs across the world at a time of growing pressure on our health care systems. Empowering consumers and harnessing big data will be crucial to delivering long-term savings for the sector.”

Global health innovations

  • The ‘Stay on Your Feet’ programme in Australia is preventing falls among older people by targeting their knowledge, attitudes and behaviours, resulting in a 22% lower incidence of self-reported falls and a 20% decrease in fall-related hospitalisations.
  • Canterbury District in New Zealand has developed a vision of ‘one system, one budget’, bringing in experts to support clinicians to redesign care pathways and workflow. The result has been reduced admissions across acute care, as well as a 20% drop in nursing homes admissions.
  • Healthcare providers in South Central Pennsylvania  used ‘big data’ to identify ‘superutilisers’, then developed a coordinated care service for these people, resulting in inpatient admissions dropping by 34% after enrolment in the programme, equating to savings of $1,242,000 for 138 patients in 12 months.

Our list of speakers for the ILC-UK ‘Future of Ageing’ conference on the 24th November is getting better and better. #futureofageing

We are delighted to announce that joining are already fantastic list of speakers are Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive of the Economic and Social Research Council), and Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson LLP).

They will be joining Baroness Altmann (Pensions Minister), Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science), David Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]), Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change); Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) and Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer, Partnership) to paint a picture of the future of ageing and explore the challenges and opportunities ahead.

'The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference' will be held on Tuesday 24th November at 20 Cavendish Square in London. Book your space now.
Early bird rates will end on Wednesday, 30th September.
Click here to book your early bird ticket

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and Partnership for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day.

For more information about sponsorship opportunities, visit the ILC-UK website or contact Lyndsey Mitchell at ILC-UK on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

Rethinking Cancer, a new report by the International Longevity Centre- UK (ILC-UK) quantifies the cost of cancer to the UK economy, its families and its communities. The independent report, supported by Bristol-Myers Squibb*, presents research on the economic and societal impact of cancer.

The report considers the wider cost of cancer alongside the 160,000 deaths it causes each year in the UK.

Key findings:

  • In a single year over 50,000 people of working age lose their lives to the disease and in 2014 these people could have contributed £585 million to the UK economy.
  • The 1.8 million people living with and beyond cancer in the UK contribute approximately £6.9 billion to the UK economy each year through paid employment.
  • The wider societal contributions of cancer survivors are significant and have been valued at £15.2 billion per year. This includes providing hours of informal care to others, along with voluntary and domestic work.

‘Rethinking Cancer’ outlines the changes required to increase survivorship and better support those living with and beyond cancer, their employers, families, friends and relatives.

Increase survival rates
The report reveals that the gap in cancer survival rates between England and the European average has remained at around 10% for the last two decades. ILC-UK calculate that closing the gap would contribute £117 million to the UK economy.

Support Cancer Survivors
Rethinking Cancer finds that if employment rates for cancer survivors were the same as for the rest of the population cancer survivors would contribute an additional £4 billion to the UK economy each year.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said: “Government and health professionals have a moral obligation to continue to improve cancer survival rates and better support cancer survivors. ‘Rethinking Cancer’ also highlights the economic imperative for action. It is vital that the Government’s vision to improve cancer outcomes through better prevention; swifter diagnosis; and better treatment, care and aftercare, is delivered. It is also important that we ensure that cancer patients receive support which can help them gain confidence in returning to employment.”


*Bristol-Myers Squibb provided financial sponsorship to cover the costs of producing the report. The company had no input to the report and ILC-UK retained full editorial control.

We are delighted to announce that Baroness Altmann (Minister of Pensions), and Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership), will be joining our list of speakers at the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November in London.

Other speakers include:

  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser and Head of the Government Office for Science);
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
  • David Willetts (Former Minister; Resolution Foundation; Kings College and author of The Pinch); and
  • Lord Filkin (Public Service and Demographic Change Committee; Ready for Ageing; Centre for Ageing Better).


'The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference' will be held on Tuesday 24th November at 20 Cavendish Square in London, 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) - 17:00.

 

WE ARE EXTENDING THE EARLY BIRD RATE UNTIL THE END OF SEPTEMBER

As a number of you may have been away during the summer break, and in light of the announcement today of these two new speakers, we have decided to offer our early bird rates for another month. The early bird rates will now be available until Wednesday the 30th September. During this time tickets will remain at:
£150 + VAT – Charity / Not for Profit / Students / Lecturers / Individuals
£200 + VAT – Corporate


Register to attend the event via the link below:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/the_future_of_ageing_an_ilc_uk_conference

 

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) for their sponsorship of the conference.

For more information about sponsorship opportunities, visit the ILC-UK website or contact Lyndsey Mitchell at ILC-UK on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

- New report points to link between ‘extra care housing’ and reduced loneliness levels
- Research also finds that those in ‘extra care housing’ feel a high degree of control over their lives

A new report from the ILC-UK has found that residential housing with flexible care provision (extra care) can have a major impact in promoting residents’ quality of life and reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation.

The report, funded by Audley Retirement and Bupa, surveyed residents of retirement villages on quality of life and used a statistical technique to compare the results with a group living in the community. This striking research revealed that village living can promote greater independence and provide greater choice in planning for later life than would otherwise be available. The research shows that the communal environment has the potential to reduce social isolation, particularly for residents who move from more rural or remote homes.

The average person in a retirement village experiences half the amount of loneliness (12.17%) than those in the community (22.83%). Nearly two thirds of respondents living in retirement villages (64.2%) could be classified as not at all lonely, and over four out of five (81.7%) said they hardly ever or never felt isolated. Over half (54.7%) often felt in tune with those around them, and nearly four in five (79.1%) hardly ever or never felt left out.

People living in this type of accommodation also reported a strong sense of control over their daily lives, nearly 10% higher than those living in the community. Control is a crucial component of quality of life measurement . They also felt secure in their homes, with 97% of respondents agreeing that they felt safe where they lived. Both of these findings were assessed using recognised quality of life measures . 

The UK is faced with an ageing population which, the ILC-UK warns, is going to become increasingly difficult to support. It is projected that in 20 years’ time, the number of people aged 85 and over will be almost two and a half times larger than in 2010 . As well as having an emotional impact, loneliness can also present physical health implications; research has shown that loneliness can accelerate cognitive decline in older adults , and even present people with a 64% greater risk of dementia . There are currently 800,000 people in England who are chronically lonely  which, if left to increase in line with the population, could create a large burden on the NHS.

The research calls on the government to:

  • Identify ways of working with the private sector to stimulate the building of new good quality retirement housing.
  • Encourage people in early older age to consider making such a move.
  • In light of the new pensions freedoms, consider offering information and advice on such housing opportunities to people who make enquiries into how to manage their retirement finances.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK commented: “This research helps confirm that good housing is good for us. Communal living commonly found in extra care and retirement villages seems to positive impact on loneliness, with very few respondents to our research saying they felt a high degree of loneliness or isolation. New and innovative models for providing social care are crucial to address rising costs for care in an aging society. But we simply aren’t building enough aspirational housing for old age. Government must ensure that planning supports the development and promotion of alternative models of housing with care.”

Nick Sanderson, CEO of Audley Retirement Villages commented: “We have long known that retirement villages offering extra care have a positive impact on those living in them. No one wants to be in a care home, and very few should need to go down that route. The ILC report corroborates our belief that the quality of life in extra care accommodation far exceeds what is possible in a care home.

“Extra care housing offers people the opportunity to live in a community of like-minded individuals, whilst remaining in their own home and retaining their independence. We were particularly pleased to see the ILC report reveal that residents feel a greater sense of control, and importantly a sense of community. Living in the right accommodation, with flexible care give our owners the opportunity to live their lives as they choose, on their own terms.

“We are faced with a growing older population, and this generation are more ambitious and active than ever. It’s crucial that there is a better supply of good quality housing that meets their changing needs. Extra care is a seemingly simple concept, but government, business and society urgently needs to accelerate the provision of alternatives to current solutions; alternatives like extra care housing that can help give older people what they need and want, as well as help the NHS avoid a care crisis.”

Paddy Brice, Managing Director, of Richmond Care Villages, which is part of Bupa, said:
“The report reflects our knowledge that retirement villages are a great way for people to maintain their independence and enjoy an active social life, with the confidence that support is on hand if needed.

“Our villagers frequently tell us they wish they’d made the move earlier. We are currently building two new villages as part of Bupa’s investment in new products and services for older people.  Care villages are clearly meeting a big demand for this style of living as the apartments are being snapped up before we have even finished building them.”

David Willetts (Former Minister; Resolution Foundation; Kings College and author of The Pinch) and Lord Filkin (Public Service and Demographic Change Committee; Ready for Ageing; Centre for Ageing Better) are to join Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) and Professor Sir Mark Walport (Chief Scientist) as speakers at ILC-UK’s first annual conference.

'The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference' will be held on Tuesday 24th November at 20 Cavendish Square in London. Book your space now. Early bird rates will end on Monday 31st August.

Book your early bird ticket before the end of August

The conference is sponsored by McCarthy & Stone and Partnership.

For more information about sponsorship opportunities, visit the ILC-UK website or contact Lyndsey Mitchell at ILC-UK on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

Ready for Ageing Alliance challenge the “myth of the baby boomer”

A new report by the Ready for Ageing Alliance seeks to bust the widely touted myth that there is a uniform group of older people in the UK – so called baby boomers – who have benefitted at the expense of younger age groups.

The report by the Ready For Ageing Alliance - a group of major national charities interested in our ageing society - presents compelling evidence that baby boomers (in this report defined as between the ages of 55-70) are in fact a diverse group of people in virtually every aspect of their lives. The report argues that in reality, one of the few things this group shares is chronological age. The Ready for Ageing Alliance argue that the term “baby boomer” has become an overused and potentially dangerous shorthand to inaccurately describe everybody in a single age group.

Evidence revealed in the report includes:

  • Whilst many boomers have benefitted from house price inflation, just under half of those aged 55-64 in England fully own their property and 24% are still renting.
  • Whilst some boomers can expect to live a long time in good health, men in the most deprived parts of the England can expect to live to 52.2 year in good health compared with 70.5 in the least deprived areas. 6.7 million people aged 45-64 have a long standing illness or a disability.
  • Whilst some boomers benefitted from free education, under one in five of those aged 55-64 in the UK have a degree.
  • Whilst some boomers will retire with good pension provision, almost three in ten of 55-64 year olds in Great Britain do not have any pension savings (nearly 2 million people).

David Sinclair, spokesperson for the Ready for Ageing Alliance said:

“The term baby boomer seems to be increasingly used to inflame divisions and resentment between younger and older generations.

The report highlights that whilst some boomers are ageing successfully, there is huge diversity in income, wealth and experiences of those aged 55-70.

Our ageing society will impact on both young and older people. Today’s younger people are tomorrows older.

If we are to ensure our increasingly ageing society is prosperous for all future generations, we must find ways of bring older and younger together rather than pitch them against each other.”

Sustainable Older Society 2020 – Health is a major piece of work from ILC-UK, kindly supported by EY. Launched in July 2014, SOS 2020 Health will focus on fostering innovation in health and social care systems. Taking a global perspective to the most important challenges to health and social care, SOS 2020 aims to raise national and international awareness of problems and possible solutions, in which we all have a vested interest.

 

Year 1 of the project will source a bank of robust innovative case studies from a range of high, middle and low income countries. The case studies, grouped around emerging healthcare trends ILC-UK have identified, will highlight innovative ways in which countries are responding to the twin challenges of population ageing and financial pressures healthcare systems are experiencing. Importantly these case studies will provide examples of providing high-quality healthcare whilst improving the financial sustainability of these health systems.

Year 2 of the project will then apply some of these selected case studies from year 1 to different country settings. Using a policy on/policy off approach, ILC-UK will quantify the potential financial savings different countries can make, if they are able to adopt one or more of these innovations sourced in year 1. 

By the end of the 2 year project, ILC-UK and EY will have created a bank of robust innovative case studies, fully costed, which we believe show promise in creating sustainable healthcare systems in a global context. This important and timely piece of work will act as a ‘call to action’ to policy makers, highlighting the need to look beyond national borders for joint solutions and international learning.

For more information on the Sustainable Older Society 2020 programme, contact Jonathan Scrutton, Research Fellow at ILC-UK, at jonathanscrutton@ilcuk.org.uk.

On the 24th November 2015, ILC-UK will be holding a day conference on ‘The Future of Ageing’. We will paint a picture of the future of ageing and explore the challenges and opportunities ahead.Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explore the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrow’s.

Register to attend the conference here.

We invite organisations to be involved in this event through various promotional opportunities, from exhibition space on the day and advertising space in the event programme to publicity and free delegate spaces.

During the conference, we will focus on five key areas: The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society; The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty?; The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing?; The future of our built environment in an ageing society; and The future of ageing research.

We are delighted to confirm that Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science), David Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]), Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change) and Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) will be speaking at the conference.

Promotional Packages are included the below table. However, we would be very happy to speak with organisations to put together a package that suits your requirements and budget.

To receive a full Promotional Opportunities brochure, or to discuss these opportunities in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell, Office and Events Manager at ILC-UK, on events@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440.

Welcome to the August edition of the ILC-UK Update.

At the end of November, we will be holding a one-day conference titled The Future of Ageing, We are delighted that Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science) and Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) will be speaking at the conference. More information about this is included below. Register soon to benefit from the early bird rates.

In July, we launched our 2015 factpack, 80 at Eighty, which was inspired by our Chief Executive Baroness Sally Greengross' 80th Birthday.

Previous ILC-UK research continues to appear in the press; this month our research was quoted in an article on divorce in later life in The Telegraph, a story about older drivers in The Daily Mail and an article on Government investment into driverless cars on Yahoo

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter.

 

Registration is now open for our 2015 conference.
Early Bird rates currently available

The Future of Ageing - ILC-UK 2015 Conference

Tuesday, 24th November 2015; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 17:00
20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

You are invited to attend the ILC-UK Conference, The Future of Ageing, on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London.
During the conference, we will paint a picture of the future of ageing and explore the challenges and opportunities ahead. Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explore the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrows.
We will explore five key areas:

  • The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society
  • The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty?
  • The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing?
  • The future of our built environment in an ageing society.
  • The future of ageing research

We are delighted to confirm that Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science) and Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) will be speaking at the conference.

We are currently offering early bird rates until the end of August.
£150+VAT - Charity / Not for Profit / Students / Lecturers / Individuals
£200+VAT - Corporate

To benefit from these rates now, please visit the ILC-UK website.
The Future of Ageing - Early bird rates


We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and Partnership for their sponsorship of this conference.

We are still accepting further sponsorship for the conference and packages include:

  • Exhibition space
  • Advertisement space in the conference brochure
  • Promotional materials in delegate packs

We are also happy to work with organisations to create bespoke packages. Please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440 for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.

 

European Adult Immunisation Hub

ILC-UK plan to launch an online European Adult Immunisation Hub in the autumn.

The online hub, supported by Pfizer, will provide a platform for materials to discuss the role of adult immunisation in supporting healthy ageing. ILC-UK will be collating interviews and blogs as well as promoting evidence and news on adult immunisation.

For more information or if you would like to contribute content, please contact David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk).

Keep up to date via Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

 

ILC-UK Publications

Opportunity Knocks: Designing Solutions for an Ageing Society
This report, which highlights the vital role of good design, technology and innovation, is a collaboration between the ILC-UK, the Institution of Engineering and Technology and the University of Cambridge’s Engineering Design Centre.

Summer Budget 2015: ILC-UK Policy Briefing
The Conservative’s first Budget as the majority party since 1996 was not without incident or surprise. This short briefing outlines the ILC-UK response to the announcements.

80 at Eighty. An ILC-UK factpack
Inspired by ILC-UK Chief Executive and founder, Baroness Sally Greengross, who turned 80 on the 29th of June this year, we have launched our new factpack, '80 at Eighty' giving 80 facts about life in your 9th decade.

At a cross-roads: understanding the future likelihood of low incomes in old age
In this new White Paper for the ILC-UK Centre for Later Life Funding we argue that “Recent successes in poverty reduction at older ages could be reduced to a footnote in history” in the absence of a long term strategy for later life funding.

Avoiding the demographic crunch: Labour supply and the ageing workforce
This new study by the CIPD, in collaboration with ILC-UK, reveals that the UK could face serious skills shortages over the next 20 years if employers don’t change their approach to workforce planning as our population ages and demand for certain services rises.

The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society
This project from ILC-UK and Age UK sets out the key transport challenges that are arising from the UK’s ageing population.

 

ILC-UK Events

Village Life: Independence, Loneliness, and Quality of Life in Retirement Villages with Extra Care

Wednesday 19th August 2015; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) – 18:00
followed by a drinks reception; London, SW1

On the 19th August, we will be holding a launch event of a new research report “Village life” which considers the impact of retirement villages on independence, loneliness and quality of life of residents.

The report incorporates a survey of residents and compares the sample with a comparable group of non-residents living in private housing.

The report has been produced with the support of Bupa and Audley. Anchor provided additional survey respondents.

During the launch, Brian Beach, Research Fellow at ILC-UK, will present the findings of the research and Nick Sanderson, CEO of Audley, and Jeremy Porteus, Director of Housing LIN, will respond.

This event is now at capacity with a long waiting list. If you have registered to attend but are no longer available, please let us know and we will release your space to someone on the waiting list.

 

ILC-UK and University of Manchester dinner debate - ‘Can integrated health and social care save money and improve services?’ supported by Independent Age.

Sunday 4th October; 18:30 (for a 19:00 dinner) – 21:00
Manchester (outside the secure zone)

In early 2015 it was announced that Greater Manchester will become the first region in England to gain full control of health spending, with 10 local authorities taking over a combined health and social care budget of approximately £6 billion.

This innovation in health care is a good opportunity to achieve joined up health and social care, a move which could improve financial sustainability of health systems as well as improving the health and wellbeing of populations.

This policy has the potential to improve the success of health innovations which have a focus on prevention. The priorities and responsibilities of local government are markedly different from central government, as it is local councils that fund other areas which may benefit from a preventative approach to health care, for example social care, housing and leisure facilities. There is therefore a direct economic interest for local authorities to, for example, delay admission into care homes, or reduce childhood obesity.

The reforms in Manchester provide a positive opportunity to take a preventative approach to health care, and are a significant opportunity to meet the challenge of the big, cross-sectional challenges resulting from demographic change.

But will the reforms deliver their promise? During this dinner debate we will consider

  • How can we ensure the devolution of health spending results in increasing focus on preventative health?
  • How can we maximise improvements in health and social care whilst also saving money?
  • How will we know if the Manchester initiative has succeeded? How should we measure success?
  • Where next for integration between health and social care?

This is a private, invitation only, dinner debate. For more information, please contact davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Other events in 2015

We continue to hold various events throughout the year. These are on a range of subjects, from transport in an ageing society to pensions to dementia.

To keep up-to-date with ILC-UK events, please continue to check the ILC-UK website on a regular basis. Public events will also be advertised to our mailing list.

If you have received this newsletter via a colleague and are not currently registered on our mailing list, you can do so by emailing us at events@ilcuk.org.uk, or by visiting www.ilcuk.org.uk.

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our last newsletter we have posted a number of interesting blogs on our website.

David Sinclair wrote a piece on The future of long term care spending in the UK. The post highlights the relatively small proportion of GDP which is spent on long term care in the UK, and warns of the false economy of squeezing social care budgets, in that it simply increases healthcare costs. This month has also seen David, in his post titled Lifelong Learning, write about the potential impact that cuts to spending on adult learning may have, with a focus on the UK’s productivity problem.

Following on from the launch of an ILC-UK report on innovation and technology in an ageing society, in Opportunity Knocks Helen Creighton writes that without improved productivity growth, healthcare spending as a percentage of GDO could more than double by 2064.

Riah Wilkinson wrote about Gill Pharaoh, a palliative care nurse, and her decision to opt for assisted suicide over growing old.

July has also published two guest blogs. John Lawson from Aviva wrote a piece on How to incentivise pension saving, arguing that using simple and familiar messages would make the concept easier to understand, such as rebranding tax relief as the Government contribution to pension saving. Kirsty Woodard write about The challenges of ageing without children, focusing on issues such as finance, management of money, low level support and a lack of an obvious power of attorney.

You can access the ILC-UK blog here; and the ILC Global Alliance blog here. If you would like to write a guest blog for us, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

PARTNERS PROGRAMME
We have revamped our ILC-UK Partners programme. Membership is open to companies and not for profit organisations.

Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti Paymaster, Legal & General, Retirement Advantage, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the new Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk. We are increasing the cost of our Partners Programme for new members in the Autumn so please get in touch as soon as possible if you are interested in joining.

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

  • Tech innovation is vital to help us adapt to ageing:  Without productivity improvements, health spending in 2063-64 might need to be 5.0 % of GDP higher than currently projected.
  • A design response to ageing can also benefit UK plc: The over 65s in the UK spend around £2.2 billion per week and they could be spending over £6 billion per week (£312 billion per annum) by 2037.
  • Government and designers must work together to break down the barriers to innovation
  • Report suggests series of ideas for innovation including “cuddle cushions”; “Boris scooters”, kettles which monitor blood pressure and TV ‘buddies’.

The report warns that without technological innovation over the next decade, health and care cost could be higher than currently projected by the Office of Budget Responsibility (OBR). Opportunity knocks points out that predictions for the growth in healthcare productivity are very optimistic given historic trends and that technological innovation will be vital to fill the gap.

Opportunity knocks argues that there is significant potential for responding to the challenges of ageing due to developments in wearable technologies, big data, 3D printing, cloud computing, the internet of things, and smart cities.
ILC-UK analysis of English Longitudinal Study of Ageing included in the report highlights some of the problems to be overcome and the barriers to technological solutions.

  • One in three 85-89 year olds have difficulty shopping for groceries and more than one in ten in this age group have difficulty managing money. More than half of those aged 90+ have difficulty shopping for groceries and a quarter of this age group have difficulty managing money.
  • 4 in 10 over 75s and three quarters of over 85s do not have internet access

“This report champions the positive impact that technology and design will play in helping us all to live longer, healthier, independent lives. However, we acknowledge that the potential of technology has not been fully realised. We also have to dispel the myth that this is simply a matter of niche solutions for an ageing society,”  said  Gordon Attenborough, the Institution of Engineering and Technology’s Head of Sectors.

“There’s so much more that we should achieve through the widespread application of existing and emerging technologies. It’s vital that we design and innovate with a broad range of users in mind, wholly inclusive and accessible to all. Achieve that and technology will mitigate the impending costs of an ageing society and deliver the promise it has failed to so far.”

David Sinclair, Director of the International Longevity Centre – UK added: “Technology undoubtedly offers significant potential to help respond to the challenges of ageing. But the opportunity of technological innovation in this area has historically been over egged and under realised. For us to maximise the potential of new technologies however we need more evidence on what really works and whether it will save money. We need regulation which protects consumers whilst not preventing technological innovation. And we need industry to recognise the potential of the older consumer and design for all. Finally, we need a public debate on the challenges and opportunities of using big data to improve the lives of older people. “

Professor John Clarkson, Director of the Engineering Design Centre at Cambridge which has pioneered the Inclusive Design approach commented: "This report highlights that there is a huge commercial opportunity for companies to design inclusively, driving increased customer satisfaction and boosting their market share by delivering more competitive products and services."

The report highlights a range of ideas for new technology which emerged from a workshop organised by ILC-UK, IET and The Engineering Design Centre at The University of Cambridge. The ideas are designed not as “solutions to ageing” but to highlight the potential for innovation in focussing on this consumer group.

  • A kettle which monitors blood pressure
  • TV buddies to allow people to remotely share the experience of watching a programme.
  • A ‘cuddle cushion’ which would allow relatives being able to send each other cuddles
  • A smart water bottle which would prompt people to drink more to prevent dehydration
  • Accessible and modern “Boris Scooters” (or Segway’s) in towns and cities to help people with mild mobility impairments get around
  • The development of national “trusted information” systems for online and telephone transactions to reduce the risk of scams

The report highlights some ideas to maximise the potential of the sharing economy to support our ageing society.

Cooking buddies

  • A barcode scanner in the home could be used to upload the contents of your fridge to an interface which would share the information with your neighbours. Taking a peek in to each other’s fridges, seeing what people had a surplus of or what was about to go out of date, could encourage neighbours to cook together making meal times more sociable.

Integrated leisure and transport

  • Leisure activities, such as a trip to the theatre or to a restaurant, could come with transport included. When you book a ticket there could be the option to also book transport. If a large number of people were also booking transport to an event a mini-bus could then be sent to collect them all at a much lower costs than them all booking taxis separately.
  • Think tank urges continued focus on preventing ill health as research highlights that ill health and inactivity is not inevitable.
  • Age UK announce plans for annual “Greengross Lecture”

A new factpack published today by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) (1) illustrates the realities of living to 80 for the 367,000 people reaching the milestone age this year.

Inspired by ILC-UK Chief Executive and founder, Baroness Sally Greengross, who turned 80 on the 29th of June this year, 80 at Eighty (2) gives 80 facts about life in your 9th decade.

Across the world, the number of people aged 80 plus has increased from 15 million (1950) to 110 million (2011). By 2050 the number aged over 80 is estimated to reach 400 million.

This factpack incorporates new analysis by ILC-UK of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing by ILC-UK. 80 at Eighty reveals:

Many English 80 year olds remain very active…

  • In England over 16,000 people aged 80+ are still in paid employment.
  • People aged 80+ may be more satisfied with their sex lives, as 67.9% report the frequency to be about right, in contrast to 54.5% of those aged 50-64.
  • More than half (55%) of men aged 80+ are married (or in a civil partnership) vs. 21% of women.

But health problems are common…

  • Around 16% of those aged 80-84 have already survived a heart attack.
  • 49% of women and 38% of men aged 80+ are often troubled with physical pain.
  • 50.8% of men and 56.7% of women aged 80 and over report having a limiting long standing illness.
  • Over one in ten of those aged 80-84 have some kind of dementia

Alongside Baroness Greengross, Julie Andrews, the Dalai Lama, Woody Allen and Norman Foster turn 80 this year. Elvis would have been 80 this year.

80 at Eighty was launched at a reception hosted by Age UK this week. During the reception, Age UK announced plans for the introduction of an annual “Greengross” lecture.

Baroness Altmann CBE, Minister of State for Pensions said
“I welcome this year’s edition of the Factpack, building as it does on the high quality research that has been the hallmark of ILC UK’s work over a number of years. In common with much of ILC UK’s research, this usefully highlights the importance of addressing the challenges and opportunities of our ageing society. Improving quality of later life is an important goal which can benefit increasing numbers of people.”

Baroness Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive said
“It is brilliant to see how many 80 year olds remain active. There were 17 runners in this year’s London Marathon aged over 80.  But 80 at Eighty also highlights the day to day challenges faced by too many people into their 80s and beyond.
The priority for me, as I pass my own 80th birthday, is to focus policy effort on ensuring more and more 80 year olds are healthier longer. Growing numbers of people aged into their 80s and 90s is great news, particularly if we can better prevent the multiple illnesses that can destroy wellbeing in later life.

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director for Age UK said:
“It is fantastic that there are more over-80s in our society than ever before and that this age group is increasing more quickly than any other.

"Growing numbers of these people are making significant contributions to their families and communities - indeed to our country - and in the process they are dismantling ageist stereotypes about what it is to be 'old'.

"No one epitomises this better than Baroness Sally Greengross, who has had a long and distinguished career supporting older people that she shows no sign of giving up, and who herself is joining the over-80s club this year.

"Age UK is therefore delighted to announce that from 2016 we will host an annual Greengross Lecture in Sally's honour. Our intention is that the Lecture will champion later life and the person or people who have made a really big difference to it that year - a fitting tribute we hope to all that Sally has done and continues to do."

Researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Southampton University, Newcastle University, Sussex University and the ILC-UK are carrying out a 4-year study that will project needs, supports and costs to help plan good, affordable dementia care up to 2040.

The MODEM project (Modelling outcome and cost impacts of interventions for dementia), funded by the NIHR and ESRC under their “Improving Dementia Care” funding initiative, aims to generate new evidence to inform policy and practice to better meet needs, promote health and wellbeing of people with affected by dementia and their carers, and achieve efficiency in the use of society’s resources.

“Recent successes in poverty reduction at older ages could be reduced to a footnote in history” in the absence of a long term strategy for later life funding, argues ILC-UK in a new White Paper for the Centre for Later Life Funding.

“At a cross-roads: understanding the future likelihood of low incomes in old age” sets out the priorities for Government over the next Parliament.

In the White Paper, the think tank argues that a strategy for later life funding must:

  • Secure effective funding for adult social care
  • Implement the Dilnot reforms
  • Find ways of ensuring the provision of mass market financial advice
  • Develop default options for those who “sit on their pension pots and do nothing”.
  • Be clear around what constitutes the deliberate deprivation of assets within the context of the new pension freedoms
  • Incentivising downsizing
  • Support innovation in the equity release market
  • Support policy which extends working lives

The White Paper sets the agenda for the ILC-UK Centre for Later Life Funding, which  will explore these issues and trends over the coming year.

Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive said: “We are at a cross roads. There has been undoubted progress in reducing pensioner poverty, particularly at older ages, but we must guard against complacency. Continuing reductions to social care budgets could lead to ever rising levels of unmet need and thereby greater deprivation amongst the oldest old. Not all babyboomers are wealthy and the pension freedoms alongside an over reliance on housing wealth poses risks to future retirement incomes. For tomorrow’s pensioners, there is a huge question about whether they will be able to depend on the state to provide adequate levels of support given the rising fiscal pressures of supporting an ageing population.”

About the Centre for Later Life funding: This report is the first publication from The Centre for Later Life Funding, which in turn, sits under the guise of the ILC-UK. The Centre is, in part, a continuation of its predecessor body the Care Funding Advice Network (CFAN) – a coalition of organisations and individuals seeking to improve on the Care Act’s recognition of the need for financial advice.

The Centre represents a significant expansion in terms of scope and output to include policy briefings and research papers which consider not just questions about care funding but questions about funding retirement more broadly. And it will be focused on developing ideas and solutions to these questions. We think that the artificial separation of retirement funding from care funding is unhelpful given that long-term care can be one of the biggest costs that people face during their retirement years, and the new “cap” will not change that fact. We are grateful to all ILC-UK Partners who have made this possible.

Demographic time bomb means employers must act to avoid a cliff-edge loss of skills and talents by 2035

A new study launched by the CIPD today reveals that the UK could face serious skills shortages over the next 20 years if employers don’t change their approach to workforce planning as our population ages and demand for certain services rises.

New research  from the CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development and the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK), the independent think tank on longevity, ageing, and population change, brings to light the challenges the UK faces over the coming two decades. As a result, the CIPD is urging organisations across all sectors to take steps now to reap the benefits of a more age diverse workforce, rather than fall victim to a mass exodus of skills as their workforce ages.

There are currently 9.4 million workers in the UK today who are over the age of 50  and while the employment rate of older workers has increased significantly in recent years, there is still a 64 percentage point drop in the employment rate between the ages of 53 and 67.

The health and social work, education and public administration are most at risk of skills shortages. This is because they are not only highly reliant on older workers (around a third or more of their workforces are over 50), but also struggle more than other sectors to remain attractive places to work for older workers. The report also found that the manufacturing, construction and transport and storage sectors all have at least a third of workers aged over 50 and typically see at least a 50% fall in the number of people employed between the ages of 45-49 and 60-64.

Ben Willmott, Head of Public Policy at the CIPD, said: “2035 may sound far off but the reality is that organisations need to get to grips with the ageing workforce challenge today or face skills shortages that will affect their ability to grow or deliver key services in the very near future. The findings in this report suggest too many employers are sleep-walking towards a significant skills problem that risks derailing their business strategy if not addressed. Not enough organisations are thinking strategically about workforce planning or even know enough about the make-up of their workforce. Employers need to recognise the value that older workers can bring to their organisation when recruiting new staff, continue to invest in people’s training and development at different stage of their careers and think about how they can transfer older workers knowledge to other parts of the business when they do retire. In addition it is increasingly in employers’ interests to think about how they can support the health and wellbeing of their staff and provide more flexible working opportunities to allow older workers to downshift and benefit from more gradual transitions into retirement if that is what they want.”

The report outlines five essential components that should form an organisation’s strategy to address the aging workforce challenges:

  1. Ensuring they have inclusive recruitment practices
  2. Improving the capability of line managers
  3. Investing in training and development
  4. Supporting employee health and wellbeing
  5. Moving towards more flexible working

Minister for Pensions, Ros Altmann, said: “The analysis in this report can help us understand the challenges that the next 20 years present much more clearly.

“Employers need to realise what they stand to lose if they fail to give opportunities to older staff. Not only could they miss out on the wealth of experience that having a diverse workforce can offer, but they also risk losing a large chunk of their workers – and valuable skills – over a short period of time, as this study shows.

“Ensuring all employees and new applicants are considered on their merits is vital, especially given the demographic challenges that our economy faces. I hope employers will remain open-minded to recruiting and training older staff, as well as considering the benefits of flexible working. This is important for older workers but it is also important for the future of our economy.”

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing at the ILC-UK, said: “Population ageing is not some distant event enabling us to bury our head in the sand. It’s already with us, affecting every corner of our lives, and the UK’s workforce is no exception. This report clearly shows that some sectors will face an exodus of staff in the short to medium term and that they, along with all other sectors, must develop robust strategies to support longer working lives, and to drive up productivity growth into the middle of this century. This means investment in people and capital. Population ageing does not have to be a by-word for economic stagnation, and with the right mix of resolve and innovative thinking, employers can help shift the UK’s path towards a prosperous yet sustainable future.”

The International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) is looking to consolidate its links with universities and grow its early and mid-career researchers panel. Meeting three times a year this panel sits alongside our full academic advisory board.

More about the International Longevity Centre-UK
ILC-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. We develop ideas, undertake research and create a forum for debate.

Role of the Panel
Providing opportunities for collaborative working and academic support to ILC-UK researchers, the panel brings together academics from a range of disciplines, with the aim of integrating academia and policy.

Benefits of being a part of the ILC-UK
- The possibility of having your research disseminated to the media and policy makers through the ILC-UK
- The option to submit joint bids for grant funding
- The opportunity to work together with researchers from a range of fields

Next Meeting: 3-5pm, Wednesday 23rd September
The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), 11 Tufton Street, London, SW1P 3QB

Come and meet our Chief Executive, Baroness Sally Greengross, a cross-bench peer, for an insider’s view of influencing and impact. There will also be a brief presentation from our Director, David Sinclair, on liaising with the media and selling in research projects. Presentations will be followed by a drinks reception.

How to Apply
We are looking for post docs from a variety of fields who are working on issues surrounding demographic change. To be considered please send a brief covering letter and your CV to helencreighton@ilcuk.org.uk. Places are limited and therefore unfortunately we cannot accept all applicants.

The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society, a new report by thinktank The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and charity Age-UK, highlights the travel problems faced by millions of older people.

 

  • Despite free bus travel, one third of over 65s in England never use public transport. And over half either never use public transport or use it less than once a month.
  • Approximately 35,000 people aged 65-84 in England have difficulty walking even a short distance, but are restricted to using public transport making any journey difficult.
  • 1.45 million over 65s find it quite difficult or very difficult to travel to a hospital, whilst 630,000 over 65s find it difficult or very difficult to travel to their GP.

Furthermore the report shows that it is the oldest old, those who are in poor health and those living in rural areas who are let down the most by the current public transport system:

 

  • Among the over 80s less than 55% report finding it easy to travel to a hospital, a supermarket or a post office.
  • Among the over 65s who report that it is ‘Very Difficult’ for them to travel to see their GP, less than 30% are in good health.
  • Just 20% of those aged 70-74 living in rural areas use public transport weekly, compared to 38% of those who live in an urban setting.

The report argues that with the start of the new Parliament it is time to embrace the opportunities for improvement. In particular, devolution of central Government powers to local communities could mean more flexible transport services which better reflect the needs of older people, while advances in technology, including driverless cars, could further expand older people’s transport options.

Helen Creighton of ILC-UK said:

“Travel is essential for independent living and has been shown to benefit physical health and mental wellbeing in later life. Furthermore there is evidence that maintaining older people’s mobility has substantial economic benefits, with analysis by ILC-UK estimating that concessionary fares will provide a net benefit to the wider community of £19.4 billion in the years up to 2037. This report, which highlights the travel difficulties facing older people, emphasises the need to adapt our transport system to meet the demands of our ageing society.”

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director at Age UK said:

"It is crucial that older people are able to get out and about, especially as the evidence shows this helps them retain their health and independence for longer. Against this context it is worrying that so many older people are struggling to reach hospital, or sometimes even their local GP.

“This report should be a wakeup call because it shows our transport system is not currently meeting the needs of our growing ageing population. The bus pass is an absolute lifeline for many who would otherwise be stranded at home and is utterly essential, but the truth is it's not enough on its own to enable older people to stay mobile.

For example, better transport planning and more imaginative use of volunteers could make a big difference today; and in the medium term 'driverless cars' and other technological innovations could be real game changers."


The application deadline for this recruitment campaign has now passed.

Thank you to all of the candidates who have applied for the post. We will now be reviewing applications and will contact those who are shortlised for an interview. Interviews will take place during the week commencing 13th July.

Due to a high volume of applications received, we may not be able to contact you if your application has not been succesful.


We are looking for an enthusiastic, flexible and eager Research and Policy Intern who is willing to embrace all aspects of the organisation. In return, you will gain valuable experience on a range of assignments: from supporting colleagues in the delivery of a project or high profile event, to independently managing the delivery of key research; you will have real responsibility from week one. Many of our interns have continued their employment with the ILC-UK after their initial placement and this represents a great opportunity to work with a small, dynamic and friendly team in the heart of Westminster.

You must have excellent research and writing skills, with a high level of attention to detail. Being adept in interpreting and using data, allied to a good knowledge of current economic and public policy debates, would be advantageous. Candidates should have high standards of written and spoken English, and an ability to write for both academic and lay audiences. You should have a good understanding and interest in the work that the ILC-UK undertakes (www.ilcuk.org.uk).

Alongside supporting our research and policy programme, we are also looking for candidates who can support our high profile events programme and support the team in our communications which might involve writing articles for trade magazines, press releases and contacting journalists.

Ideally you will have an interest in the economic and health implications of an ageing population, however just as important is a willingness and ability to learn about new topics quickly.

You must have a good knowledge of Microsoft Office programmes (MS Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint). We are looking for someone who has a flexible attitude, who is comfortable working in a small team and who is able to adapt to new tasks with ease.

We are open to applications from recent graduates, or individuals looking for experience in a policy environment.

If this sounds of interest to you, then please send a (maximum) two page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Head of Economics of an Ageing Society at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.

The closing date for applications is 5pm on Sunday 21st June.

Interviews will be conducted during the week commencing 13th July 2015, so please ensure your availability upon application.

Please note that if you have not heard from us within 3 days of the interview date, you have been unsuccessful in your application.

You can find the job description for the Research and Policy Intern position below:

Documents:

ILC-UK Research and Policy Intern 2015 - Job Description (PDF)

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The ILC-UK today urges mortgage providers to better understand, and respond to, the increasing numbers of retirees taking loans into retirement. 

Speaking at a conference organised by the Council of Mortgage Lenders, the ILC-UK Director, David Sinclair urged the industry to ensure they do not discriminate on basis of age alone. Sinclair also urged older people to think very carefully before looking to “buy to let” to give them a return on their pension savings.

Sinclair welcomed the work being done by the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) on this topic and urged the industry body to continue to work with providers to ensure they are better equipped to respond to the challenges of demographic change.

Since 2010, both the number and percentage of mortgages extending into retirement has increased(1).

The ILC-UK presentation draws on five years of research into secured and unsecured debt published by the charity. It has been made available on the ILC-UK website (4).

In late 2013, ILC-UK published a report by the Personal Finance Research Centre on the mortgage debt of older households and the effect of age.

The report found (3):

  • One in five of all households (21 per cent) headed by someone aged 50 or over had outstanding mortgage borrowing on their main home in 2008-10. One in ten older households (65+) had outstanding mortgage borrowing on their main residence. 65-69 year old households with mortgage debt still owed on average £55,200.
  • 13 per cent of all older mortgaged households were struggling to repay their mortgage.
  • More than one third of those aged over 70 with outstanding borrowing had an unlinked interest only mortgage

ILC-UK research in 2014 revealed that the average housing wealth of retirees is £122,000 or £1.4tn in total (2).

While lending criteria has been tightened across the board as a consequence of first the credit crunch and then the MMR, ILC-UK argue that this may not fully explain the rising numbers of people who appear to be excluded from the mortgage market purely on the basis of age.

In his presentation, David Sinclair will argue that broader demographic trends, financial insecurity and public policy change is resulting in increasing numbers of us needing to take a mortgage into retirement.

Speaking at the conference, Sinclair urges older people to be aware of the risks of splashing their pension pot on buy to let properties. Sinclair points out that property investments can be risky and they do not guarantee returns.  ILC-UK analysis has shown that in the 1990s it took 50 quarters for inflation adjusted house prices to regain their losses in value. Outside the South East and London, UK house prices in many areas remain below inflation adjusted 2007 levels.

International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) Director, David Sinclair said:

“The industry and the regulatory environment have been seemingly struggling to respond to ageing and demographic change. We are, however, very pleased to see that the industry have begun to respond to these challenges through the important work being led by the CML.

We are living longer, our family structures are changing, we are marrying later and we are working longer.  At the same time, financial insecurity will result in more people needing to borrow more and later in life.

We should be particularly worried about those retirees with interest only mortgages but no linked investment.

Whilst the introduction of “pension freedoms” could be a boon to the buy to let sector, older people should make sure they take advice before making the jump.

With older people holding almost 1.4tn in wealth in their homes, equity release is going to be an attractive way of supplementing a pension for many.

The industry needs to ensure that the income poor asset rich pensioners are well served by this market. That said, the recent growth in the number of people aged 55-64 taking equity release is potentially very worrying.”

In the presentation, David Sinclair urges the industry to lend responsibly but not arbitrarily refuse loans on the basis of age alone. He also calls on the industry and Government to work to address the fear of borrowing faced by many income poor, asset rich customers.

Sinclair urges Government and industry to work together to ensure that individuals have access to advice. He also urges Government to push ahead with housebuilding plans to ensure that older people have more options to move to more appropriate homes. 

References
1) http://www.cml.org.uk/news/725/
2) From ELSA. Mayhew 2014. See http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/the_uk_equity_bank_towards_income_security_in_old_age
3) The mortgage debt of older households and the effect of age http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/the_mortgage_debt_of_older_households_and_the_effect_of_age
4) Available via the blog on the ILC-UK website and at http://www.slideshare.net/ilc-uk

Contact
David Sinclair at ILC-UK on 02073400440 or davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk

Notes
David Sinclair spoke today at the CML conference on “Pension tension: New thinking on lending into retirement” http://www.cml.org.uk/events/pension-tension-new-thinking-on-lending-into-retirement/

 

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