NEWS:


The Rt Hon. Stephen Dorrell, Chair of the NHS Confederation and former Secretary of State for Health and former Chair of the Health Select Committee, and Dwayne Johnson, Director of Adult Social Care, Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council have agreed to join our fantastic list of speakers at the Future of Ageing conference.

Dr Margaret McCartney, GP, author and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, will also present at the conference. Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho of the Department of Ageing and Life Course at the World Health Organisation will also focus on health and care issues, taking a more global perspective.

Conference attendees will also hear from:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • The Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2001

Join as at the Future of Ageing Conference on Wednesday, 9th November. Our Earlybird prices must end on 31st August, so sign up now to take advantage of this special discounted rate.

 

 

Functional foods could play an important role in supporting older people’s health says a report published this week by the International Longevity Centre-UK.

Functional foods could play an important role in supporting older people’s health says a report published this week by the International Longevity Centre-UK. Functional foods are not however a silver bullet; they complement rather than replace a healthy diet.

The report “Older people and functional foods: The importance of diet in supporting older people’s health; what role for functional foods?” reviews current dietary recommendations for older people, looks at consumer behaviour towards functional foods, and asks whether functional foods have a role to play in older people’s diets.

The report, made possible by Danone and prepared by Rebecca Taylor, Senior Researcher at ILC-UK, shows that the common health concerns of older people, such as cardiovascular disease, bone health and gastrointestinal functioning are the main areas targeted by the most common functional foods, namely cholesterol lowering products, probiotics, and calcium and vitamin D enriched products. It is not surprising therefore, that an older person who perceives themselves as needing the health benefit provided by a functional food, is more likely to consume it.

The report finds the scientific evidence for the cholesterol lowering ability of plant stanol/sterol containing products to be highly robust and argues that there is a case for introducing such products into the diets of older people in order to help reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.

The report finds that the UK’s current recommended intakes for vitamin D and calcium for older people now appear to be out of step with current nutritional science, which suggests higher levels of both nutrients are needed. The report also highlights the fact that current dietary guidelines treat older people as a homogenous group when in fact the health and nutritional needs of a 55 year old can be quite different to those of an 85 year old.

Many older people are susceptible to gastrointestinal problems, some of which can be serious, and many of which impact quality of life. Probiotic functional foods show significant promise in this area and solid scientific evidence already exists for some complaints, for example antibiotic associated diarrhoea.

In total, ILC-UK makes 11 recommendations on older people and functional foods including recommendations for action and future research.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said:

“Good nutrition is vital to maintain good health and prevent disease in people of all ages. This report shows that alongside a healthy diet, functional foods can play a role in supporting the nutritional needs of older people including the prevention and management of chronic disease. There is however a need for further research into older people and functional foods and ILC-UK calls on government and the public and private sectors to support such research.

Bone health is a concern for many older people, particularly postmenopausal women, and this report recommends that calcium and vitamin D strategies for older people in the UK should be reviewed. The report also calls on governments and regulatory authorities to take into account the fact that different age groups of older people can have different health and nutritional needs.”

TOP STORIES

Reserve your place at the 2017 Future of Ageing Conference.

The ILC-UK has launched a Commission on Dementia and Music, designed to explore the current and potential role of music-based interventions in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, care and end of life care for people with dementia. As part of this high level Commission, we are seeking written evidence from a range of experts, framed by two overarching questions.

In response to the Office for Budget Responsibility's first Fiscal Risk report, which found that ageing and technology cost pressures make health spending the biggest risk to fiscal sustainability, Sally-Marie Bamford, Director of Strategy and Research said...

A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and supported by Royal London finds that those who received financial advice in the 2001-2007 period had accumulated significantly more liquid financial assets and pension wealth than their unadvised equivalent peers by 2012-14

As a futures organisation focused on the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change, we work across the lifecourse, including its beginning, and end.

A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) argues that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) could plunge medical practice back into the dark ages and negate longevity improvements made over the past 50 years.

 

CATEGORIES: