NEWS:

This year's Future of Ageing Conference will play host to 10 different panel debates covering everything from automating care, ageism, innovation in housing and the end of life.

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today

Confirmed workshops and confirmed speakers include:

Opening Keynote: Dr Pol Vandenbroucke, Vice President Medical Strategy, Pfizer

How can we maximise the economic contribution of older people?

  • Diane Kenwood, Editor, Woman's Weekly and ILC-UK Trustee
  • John McTernan, Senior Vice President, PSB and Former Political Secretary to Prime Minister Tony Blair
  • Jane Ashcroft CBE, Chief Executive, Anchor
  • Professor Debora Price, President, British Society of Gerontology and Director, MICRA
  • Professor Andrew Scott, Professor of Economics, London Business School

Is the Future less or more ageist?

  • Sam Smethers, Chief Executive, Fawcett Society
  • Rt Hon Dame Margaret Hodge MP, Member of Parliament for Barking, discussing 'How to stop wasting women's talents: overcoming our fixation with youth'
  • Yasmin Boudiaf, Virtual Reality Expert, discussing 'Can we use Virtual Reality to tackle ageism?'
  • Tessa Harding, Ex-NCVO and Help the Aged

Can technology drive innovation in pensions, health and care?

  • Alison Martin, Global Head of Life and Health, Swiss Re
  • Other speakers to be confirmed

Is antimicrobial resistance a threat to longevity - and what can we do about it? 

  • Mark Chataway, Managing Director, Hyderus
  • Professor Anthony Scott, Director, The Vaccine Centre, LSHTM
  • Professor Alan Johnson, Head of AMR, Public Health England's Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control

How can we save the NHS?

  • Rt Hon Stephen Dorrell, Chair, NHS Confederation and former Health Secretary
  • Dr David Oliver, Clinical Vice President, Royal College of Physicians
  • Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Pamela Spence, Partner, Global Life Sciences Industry Leader, EY

More inequalities in a world of austerity? 

  • Anna Dixon, Chief Executive, Centre for Ageing Better
  • Inequalities in Life Expectancy: Andrew Gaches, Head of Longevity, Life and Financial Services, Hymans Robertson
  • Inequalities in Old Age: Professor Thomas Scharf, Professor of Social Gerontology, Newcastle University
  • Austerity and Health Across Europe: Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing, International Longevity Centre - UK

Filling the skills gap: Migration, more older workers, or both?

  • Yvonne Sonsino, Partner and Innovation Leader, Mercer and Co-Chair DWP Fuller Working Lives Business Strategy Group
  • Professor Jonathan Portes, Professor of Economics and Public Policy, King's College London
  • Dean Hochlaf, Assistant Economist, International Longevity Centre - UK

Can we automate care?

  • George Holley-Moore, Research and Policy Manager, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Eric Kihlstrom, Co-Founder, KareInn
  • Pamela Spence, Partner, Global Life Sciences Industry Leader, EY

How can the housing industry innovate for tomorrow's older consumers?

  • Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Nigel Howell, Chief Executive, FirstPort
  • Gary Day, Land and Planning Director, McCarthy and Stone
  • Lord Best, Co-Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group on Housing and Care for Older People

The future of the end: Living forever or dying in style?

  • Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • Professor Douglas Davies FBA, Professor of the Study of Religion, Durham University, and Director of the Centre for Death and Life Studies
  • Louise Winter, Founder, Poetic Endings
  • Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Manager, International Longevity Centre - UK

Closing Keynote: Professor Andrew Scott, Professor of Economics, London Business School and author of 'The 100 year life'.

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today

There will also be a number of keynote presentations, and an open slot to allow one delegate to present their idea to help society prepare for the future of ageing.

Join us at #FutureofAgeing
For more information click here: http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

Future of Ageing 2017: Sponsored by:

Supported by:

Research conducted by the International Longevity Centre (ILC-UK) has suggested that only 11 constituencies would have had different results in the 2015 General Election, had turnout rates of those between 18-34 matched that of the population over 65.

ILC-UK will present the research at a debate on the topic of “if young people ruled the world”, on Monday 22nd May (Voter Registration Deadline day).

Young people between 18-24 report “lower levels of knowledge about politics” and are “less likely” to participate in political activities than other age groups [1]. In the 2015 General election 78% of those over 65 turned out to vote, while only 43% of those between 18-24 and 54% between 25-34 turned out to vote.

Using data from Ipsos MORI and the ONS, it was found that 9 Conservative and 2 Liberal Democrat constituencies (including the seat of Nick Clegg, former deputy Prime Minister) would have swung to Labour, had the voting turnout of those between 18-34 matched that of the over-65’s and if these new voters reflected the national trend.



Source: Ipsos MORI – How Britain Voted in 2015

There are several reasons why the youth vote has such little influence:

  • Voters over 55 outnumber younger voters in 445 of the 573 constituencies in England and Wales.
  • Of these, 118 constituencies have over twice as many voters over 55 than younger voters.
  • Older voters were more homogenous in their voting preference in the 2015 election, with 47% voting Conservative, a 24-point lead over labour.
  • In contrast, Labour had a 16-point lead over the Conservatives amongst 18-24 year olds, but only a 6-point lead amongst 25-34 year olds.

The 9 Conservative seats which would have swung to Labour are: Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport, Derby North, Croydon Central, Gower, Brighton, Kemptown, Thurrock, Vale of Clwyd, Morley and Outwood, and Bury North.

The 2 Liberal Democrat seats which would have swung to Labour are: Leeds North West and Sheffield, Hallam.

According to ONS population projections, the number of younger people in the UK, below 30 is expected to decrease by 2050. In contrast, the number of over-65’s is expected to rise by almost 70%. This will likely consolidate the political power of older people further.

Attempting to get young people to vote through the promise of more influence is likely to be unhelpful in terms of long-term engagement, which is the key issue.

While voting is incredibly important, it is important for young people to engage in politics, to make their case for policies among the wider and older electorate. ILC-UK is calling for automatic registration, so that all eligible UK citizens, regardless of age or any other factor can be guaranteed a vote.

Dean Hochlaf, Assistant Economist at the ILC-UK says:

“Democracy isn’t something that stops when you leave the voting booth, it has enormous influence over our everyday lives. While attempts to get young people to vote are encouraging, we need to do more to stimulate active engagement in politics. An ageing society is going to put more pressure on government resources and voters will be taking this into consideration when they cast their ballots.

The challenge for young people is how do they take their case to the rest of the electorate for policies that are going to benefit their generation and build a more inclusive society. This might not be the easiest task, but it will be impossible if young people continue to be left out of the political debate”.

Notes

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

An ILC-UK Partners Programme Debate: If young people ruled the world?... Maximising the voice of younger people in an ageing society.

Wednesday, 22nd May 2017; 08:30 (for 09:00) - 11:00, Great Hall, Chartered Insurance Institute, 20 Aldermanbury, London EC2V 7HY, Chair by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE Register here: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/an_ilc_uk_partners_programme_debate_if_young_people_ruled_the_world..._maxi
 
________________________________________
[1] Apostolova. V, Uberoi. E, and Johnston, N. (2017) “Political disengagement in the UK: who is disengaged?” House of Commons Library, Briefing Paper, Number CBP7501, 26 April
If you do not wish to receive future press notices from ILC-UK, please respond and we will remove you from our lists.

Since our August update, we have launched four new reports, including an analysis of future care sector workforce shortages in the context of Brexit, and a review of financial capability interventions and older people in retirement.

We have also opened bookings for a December event on new approaches to means-testing and funding adult social care, and limited spaces are still available for the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our LinkedIn Group.

 

ILC-UK's Future of Ageing Conference less than one month away

George Sinclair, age 9, explains the urgent need to address the challenges posed by our rapidly ageing society

The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference
Wednesday, 9th November 2016; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

Current confirmed speakers include:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • Dr Maragaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, and
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

For more information and to register to attend, click on the below link
ILC-UK 2016 Future of Ageing Conference

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

Further support has kindly been received from Action on Hearing Loss, lip reading practice and Drink Wise, Age Well.

We have a number of promotional opportunities for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference. For full details, please click here.

We are also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. If you would like to discuss sponsorship and the various packages in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Support the work of the International Longevity Centre - UK

As an independent charity with no core funding, the ILC-UK relies upon the support of our Partners Programme and individual research commissions to operate.

If you would like to support our work producing research and policy analysis and hosting around 50 free-to-attend events a year, you can now donate to the ILC-UK via the secure BT My Donate portal below.

Any support you can provide would be greatly appreciated, and will allow us to continue to address the greatest challenges facing Government and society in the context of our rapidly ageing society and demographic change.

Please click here to donate to the ILC-UK

 

ILC-UK Publications

Brexit and the future of the migrant social care workforce
In this follow up to ILC-UK's 2015 report ‘Moved to Care’, ILC-UK and Independent Age update the analysis of the future workforce shortages in adult social care in England to take account of the EU referendum result of the 23rd June.

Still not ready for ageing
The Ready for Ageing Alliance assess the Government's response to our rapidly ageing society and finds the UK is still not ready.Far from seeing sustained progress over the past few years, society is seemingly going into “reverse gear” in some respects.

What works? A review of the evidence on financial capability interventions and older people in retirement
Commissioned by the Money Advice Service and the UK Financial Capability Strategy, this report carried out an extensive scoping review to establish which financial education programmes designed to improve financial capability amongst older people are effective.

Pension coverage and pension freedoms: Lessons from Hong Kong
This think-piece looks to Hong Kong,  whose pension infrastructure is similar to the one emerging in the UK to examine the potential impact of the UK's recent pension reforms.

 

ILC-UK Events

Costing care: New approaches to means-testing and funding adult social care

Wednesday 14th December; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) - 18:30 (followed by a short drinks reception)
Staple Inn Hall, Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, High Holborn, London WC1V 7QJ

This ILC-UK, IFoA and Cass Business School joint event will launch a new paper which reviews the present and proposed formula for means-testing adult social care in England.

Chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK, the launch will include a keynote presentation from report author, Professor Les Mayhew, Professor of Statistics, Faculty of Actuarial Science and Insurance, Cass Business School, and a response from an expert panel of actuaries and related professionals.

Limited spaces are still available for this event.
Please click here to register for this event

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our August update, we have published analysis on how best to support tomorrow's workforce; addressing the persistence of poverty across Europe; the dilemma faced by central banks, and guest blogs from a variety of expert contributors.

Blogs written by ILC-UK researchers include 'Are immigrants driving down wages in the adult social care sector?', 'Coming soon to a welfare state near you? A universal basic income', and 'Creeping protectionism and population ageing: a lethal combination'. ILC-UK economists Ben Franklin and Dean Hochlaf have also published an ILC-UK Economic Insight report into the challenges facing central banks in the context of the economic 'new normal'.

Our guest blogs have included articles from Audley Chief Executive Nick Sanderson on 'Downsizing and the housing black hole', and from Claire Turner, Interim Director of Evidence at the Centre for Ageing Better on 'Ageing: the things we don't talk about'.

We have also published three guest blogs as part of our 'Future of Ageing' series: researchers from the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation have published on 'Developing and evaluating sustainable services in an ageing society'; Clare Bambra, Professor of Public Health Geography at Durham University has written on how 'Where you live can kill you', and Dr Marianne Coleman, Emeritus Reader in Educational Leadership as written on 'The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society'.

We also regularly publish our Friday Five: five key facts about issues related to ageing.

To read these and all our blogs, please click here.

 

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.


The Rt Hon. Stephen Dorrell, Chair of the NHS Confederation and former Secretary of State for Health and former Chair of the Health Select Committee, and Dwayne Johnson, Director of Adult Social Care, Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council have agreed to join our fantastic list of speakers at the Future of Ageing conference.

Dr Margaret McCartney, GP, author and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, will also present at the conference. Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho of the Department of Ageing and Life Course at the World Health Organisation will also focus on health and care issues, taking a more global perspective.

Conference attendees will also hear from:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • The Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2001

Join as at the Future of Ageing Conference on Wednesday, 9th November. Our Earlybird prices must end on 31st August, so sign up now to take advantage of this special discounted rate.

 

Since our June update, we have launched five new reports, including a landmark publication on the future of the UK welfare state; a report on the economic benefits of migration; and our annual factpack, which this year focuses on the state on the nation's housing.

We also extended the early bird rate for the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference to Wednesday, 31st August, and held our second national retirement income summit at the Chartered Insurance Institute.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our LinkedIn Group.


ILC-UK hosts the first Ageing Society pub quiz to launch 'The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack'

On Monday, 18th July ILC-UK hosted the first Ageing Society Pub Quiz to launch 'The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack', supported by FirstPort. Attendees competing across 13 teams tested their knowledge of everything from the issues surrounding an ageing society, to whether the cumulative age of ILC-UK staff was higher or lower than that of the current members of the Rolling Stones.

Thank you to everyone who participated!

 

ILC-UK Publications

The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack
Despite significant increases in the numbers of older people living alone, half of all older people with care needs haven’t made adaptations to their homes to make them easier to live in. Whilst specialist retirement housing can offer more adaptations and play a part in supporting downsizing, the report also finds that the retirement housing supply gap is set to worsen.

Measuring state effectiveness: an ILC-UK index
This technical report presents a new index for measuring State Effectiveness, and comparative performance analysis of countries across Europe. The report warns that 'silver welfare', the strategy of focusing spending on social protection for old age is the only strategy consistently associated with bad outcomes.

Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state
This landmark publication features contributions from more than 20 leading public figures on the reforms necessary to ensure the future of the welfare state. 'Towards a new age' provocatively argues that if governments make policy based purely to get re-elected, the welfare state could become so distorted that it might sow the seeds of its own demise.
A future of the welfare state thinkpiece

Innovate to Alleviate: Exploring how the role of an enhanced care worker could address skills shortages in the social care sector
This report, commissioned by the Department for Health, is the first to examine a newly developed role in the adult social care sector. The first scoping review of its kind, the report is a qualitative investigation compiled from interviews with individuals from all levels of the care home sector.

Immigration: Encourage or deter?
This report demonstrates that migration could boost the UK economy by £625 billion (or 11.4%) by 2064-65. It also finds that migration is likely to support the sustainability of government finances, and that raising the State Pension Age alone will not stabilise the UK's declining dependency ratio.

 

ILC-UK Events

Housing in an Ageing Society
Wednesday 12th October; 10:00 (for a 10:30 start) - 12:30; Legal & General

On Tuesday, 19th July we launched 'The state of the nation's housing', with the support of FirstPort.

This special half day event on Wednesday, 12th October will feature discussion and debate amongst industry experts and Government on the topic of Housing in an Ageing Society.

Speakers include:

  • Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, Newly appointed Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Communities and Local Government;
  • Nigel Wilson, Group Chief Executive, Legal & General
  • Dr Brian Beach, Research Fellow, ILC-UK.

This event is fully subscribed, and is operating a waiting list.
Eventbrite - Housing in an Ageing Society


The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference
Wednesday, 9th November 2016; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

We are pleased to announce that since our June update a further two new keynote speakers have been confirmed for the Future of Ageing 2016. We have also extended our early bird rates until the end of August 2016.

Current confirmed speakers include:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dr Maragaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, and
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

Further support has kindly been received from:

    

 

We have a number of promotional opportunities for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference. For full details, please click here.

We are also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. If you would like to discuss sponsorship and the various packages in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our June update, we have published ILC-UK analysis on the reform of nursing bursaries and the end of Osbornomics, and a variety of blogs from expert guest authors.

Blogs written by ILC-UK researchers include an assessment of reforms of nursing bursaries, lessons from Asia and the rest of the world on maximising the potential of an ageing population, a summary of the Drink Wise, Age Well Inquiry and the end of Osbornomics.

Our guest blogs have included articles on getting young people saving (Michelle McGagh, freelance journalist); on why declining dopamine may explain why older people take fewer risks (Dr Robb Rutledge, Senior Research Associate, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL); and insights into the motivations of young and old voters in the EU referendum (Dr Stuart Fox, Quantitative Research Associate, Wales Institute of Social & Economic Research, Data & Methods).

We have also published guest blogs on combating ageism, fear and loathing in Brexit Britain (Jilly Forster, Founder, Forster Communications) and the difficult conversations people avoid as they get older (Claire Turner, Interim Director of Evidence, Centre for Ageing Better)

We also regularly publish our Friday Five: five key facts about issues related to ageing.

To read these and all our blogs, please click here.

 

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

Ready for Ageing Alliance challenge the “myth of the baby boomer”

A new report by the Ready for Ageing Alliance seeks to bust the widely touted myth that there is a uniform group of older people in the UK – so called baby boomers – who have benefitted at the expense of younger age groups.

The report by the Ready For Ageing Alliance - a group of major national charities interested in our ageing society - presents compelling evidence that baby boomers (in this report defined as between the ages of 55-70) are in fact a diverse group of people in virtually every aspect of their lives. The report argues that in reality, one of the few things this group shares is chronological age. The Ready for Ageing Alliance argue that the term “baby boomer” has become an overused and potentially dangerous shorthand to inaccurately describe everybody in a single age group.

Evidence revealed in the report includes:

  • Whilst many boomers have benefitted from house price inflation, just under half of those aged 55-64 in England fully own their property and 24% are still renting.
  • Whilst some boomers can expect to live a long time in good health, men in the most deprived parts of the England can expect to live to 52.2 year in good health compared with 70.5 in the least deprived areas. 6.7 million people aged 45-64 have a long standing illness or a disability.
  • Whilst some boomers benefitted from free education, under one in five of those aged 55-64 in the UK have a degree.
  • Whilst some boomers will retire with good pension provision, almost three in ten of 55-64 year olds in Great Britain do not have any pension savings (nearly 2 million people).

David Sinclair, spokesperson for the Ready for Ageing Alliance said:

“The term baby boomer seems to be increasingly used to inflame divisions and resentment between younger and older generations.

The report highlights that whilst some boomers are ageing successfully, there is huge diversity in income, wealth and experiences of those aged 55-70.

Our ageing society will impact on both young and older people. Today’s younger people are tomorrows older.

If we are to ensure our increasingly ageing society is prosperous for all future generations, we must find ways of bring older and younger together rather than pitch them against each other.”

New research by the ILC-UK reveals a continuing generational divide in access to and trust of health information. The research finds that older people are more likely to use and trust doctors and nurses whilst younger people are more likely than older to look towards pharmacists and online and telephone services.

  • One in seven UK survey respondents aged over 65 report it difficult to find health information.
  • Study paints worrying picture of health literacy across all ages with only around 7 in 10 people in the UK saying they would ‘definitely’ go to the doctor if they found a lump on their neck.
  • Whilst older people in the UK are more likely to report excellent or very good health than those in Germany, France and Portugal, 12% of people aged under 24 in the UK reported fair or poor health, a figure much higher than found in Germany, France and Portugal

“Next Generation Health Consumers”, supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer, explores where consumers go to seek out health information and who they trust.  Launching the report, ILC-UK argue that the diverse demands for health information across the generations strengthen the case not to cut traditional health information services and simply replace them with online and telephone services.

Whilst older people in the UK are more likely to report excellent or very good health than those in Germany, France and Portugal, 12% of people aged under 24 in the UK reported fair or poor health, a figure much higher than found in Germany, France and Portugal

One in seven of our UK survey respondents aged over 65 report it difficult to find health information.

The research also finds that:

Healthcare professionals such as doctors and nurses are the most frequently used and trusted sources of health information but they are still sometimes underused. Older people in the UK are more likely than younger people to go to their GP to seek advice on healthy ageing. Older people also tend to have higher levels of confidence in GPs than younger people. Only around 7 in 10 people in the UK said they would ‘definitely’ go to the doctor if they found a lump on their neck, or if they wanted information about a long-term illness, while only just over half (51.4%) would go to the doctor for information about staying healthy. 

Younger people are more likely than older to trust pharmacists: Four out of five people aged 24 or below consider pharmacists to be ‘always/ mostly’ trustworthy compared with over half (56.7%) of people aged 65 or above. While levels of trust may have been lower for those aged 65 and over, pharmacists represent the most helpful source for receiving more health information among this group.

Around a quarter of younger respondents in the UK would like to receive more information from pharmacists, and around half would like to get more health information over the internet. Whilst trust in pharmacists is particularly high among those aged 24 or under, they would still prefer to receive more health information online than from pharmacists in person.

Younger people are more likely than older to search out and trust health advice from friends, friends or colleagues. 6 in 10 under 24 year olds are ‘definitely’ or ‘very likely’ to go to family members and social networks in the event of discovering a lump on their neck. This compares with just over one in four people (27%) aged 65+. Older people are less likely than younger people to trust this source of advice.

Trust and use of in web-based health sources is stronger among younger people than older.

Young people aged 24 or under are more likely than other age groups to say that they are ‘definitely’ or ‘very likely’ to go to a medical helpline for further information on any particular health issue. Younger people in UK are twice as likely as older people to “definitely” contact a medical helpline in the event of finding a lump on their neck. Levels of trust in medical helplines declines with age in the UK. And just 5.4% of people aged 34 or under and 7.2% of those over 55 would find it helpful to get more health information from this source.

Sally-Marie Bamford, Research Director at ILC-UK said “Whilst the majority of us do not find it difficult to access health information, this research highlights that there are millions who struggle. This research highlights that there isn’t a one size fits all solution. Older and younger people trust and use different sources of health information. If we are to have an empowered and healthy older population, improving access to health information is vital. As new ways of communicating become more commonplace we must not forget the diversity of our population. We must work to raise the health literacy of all ages.”

Launching the report, ILC-UK urge health information providers to recognise the need for significantly different tools to communicate health messages to older and younger people. The report urges service providers to continue to invest in tackling digital exclusion and encourages Governments and Health and Social Care professionals to do more to develop health literacy as part of strategy to help raise awareness among population of how to look after themselves.

A new report, published today, by the ILC-UK and supported by an unrestricted grant from Pfizer, explores where consumers go to seek out health information and who they trust. “Next Generation Health Consumers” incorporates a survey of 4,182 individuals across the UK, Germany, France and Portugal.

  • One third of older people in France and Germany report finding health information very or fairly difficult.
  • One in seven over 65s in the UK report it difficult to find health information.
  • Almost one in four of our survey respondents aged under 24 in France reported it to be very or fairly difficult to find health information (compared with 12.6% in Germany, 4.35 in the UK and 9% in Germany)

The research finds unsurprisingly, that as we get older we report poorer health. But whilst older people in the UK report better health than older people in other countries, younger people in the UK report poorer health than those of the same age in Germany, France and Portugal.

  • Our sample of Portuguese older people were much more likely to report poor health than those in the other countries studied. Three quarters of Portuguese aged over 65 reported fair or poor health compared to just under four in ten people in the UK.
  • Older people in the UK were more likely to report excellent or very good health than those in Germany, France and Portugal
  • 12% of people aged under 24 in the UK reported fair or poor health, a figure much higher than found in Germany, France and Portugal

Across Europe the majority of citizen report that they find it very or fairly easy to access health information but there are significant numbers who struggle. Older people are more likely than younger people to report difficulties in finding health information. But many younger people also struggle.

  • More than one third of older people in France and Germany reported finding health information very or fairly difficult. One in seven over 65s in the UK report it difficult to find health information.
  • Significant numbers of younger people find it very or fairly difficult to find health information. Almost one in four of our survey respondents aged under 24 in France reported it to be very or fairly difficult (compared with 12.6% in Germany, 4.35 in the UK and 9% in Portugal)

The report highlights where individuals go for information about their health across the four countries studied and finds:

  • Across all age ranges and countries, doctors and nurses are a very important source of health information.
  • Individuals were less likely however to go to doctors and nurses for information about staying healthy. The severity of the health condition that determines the extent to which individuals prefer to consult their GP or nurse for advice.

The report finds a strong relationship between trust and usage of health information.  Across all countries and sample members, the usage of and trust in doctors and nurses dominates over all other health service providers.

Across the four countries studied, the report finds however that different age groups look to different sources of health information with younger people for example, more likely than older to trust and use the internet in general and therefore to use it also for this purpose.

  • Among our Portuguese sample, just 6.8% of people aged 65 or older use the internet compared with 91.0%  of those aged 24 or younger. Our UK sample found around 44.5% of people aged 65 or more use the web while 99.1% of those aged 24 or less do. The same pattern was observed in Germany and France

The report finds that there could be an increasingly important health role for pharmacists across Europe:

  • For those aged 65 or more, pharmacists represent the most helpful source for receiving more information from in three of the four countries we feature. In the UK, 33.5% of those aged 65+ (88 out of 263 persons in this age range) want more health-related content from this source; while in Germany and Portugal 30.6% (67 out of 219 people) and 36.7% (76 out of 207 people) do respectively.

Sally-Marie Bamford, Research Director at ILC-UK said “Whilst the majority of us do not find it difficult to access health information, this research highlights that there are millions who struggle. This research highlights that there isn’t a one size fits all solution. Older and younger people trust and use different sources of health information. If we are to have an empowered and healthy older population, improving access to health information is vital. As new ways of communicating become more commonplace we must not forget the diversity of our population. We must work to raise the health literacy of all ages.”

 

 

2014 ILC GLobal Alliance Conference
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2014 ILC Global Alliance Annual Conference


ILC-UK were delighted to host the 2014 International Longevity Centre Global Alliance (ILC Global Alliance) Annual Conference in October.

The ILC Global Alliance is an international consortium of member organisations.

The mission of the ILC Global Alliance is to help societies to address longevity and population ageing in positive and productive ways, typically using a life course approach, highlighting older people's productivity and contributions to family and society as a whole. The Alliance member organisations carry out the mission through developing ideas, undertaking research and creating forums for debate and action, in which older people are key stakeholders.

The ILC Alliance currently includes centres in the United States of America, Japan, the United Kingdom, France, the Dominican Republic, India, South Africa, Argentina, The Netherlands, Israel, Singapore, Czech Republic, China and Brazil. These centres work both autonomously and collaboratively to study how greater life expectancy and increased proportions of older people impact nations around the world and seek to offer solutions to the challenges they bring.


During the conference, we were delighted to welcome three new centres to the alliance: Canada, Australia and Germany, bringing the membership to 17.


More information about the ILC Global Alliance and its members can be found on the ILC Global Alliance website: www.ilc-alliance.org

 
During the conference, we held a number of events:
At the Ageing Across the World dinner on Monday 27th October, kindly hosted and supported by EY, we heard from Silvia Stefanoni (HelpAge International) and Ben Franklin (ILC-UK).

Over table discussions we looked at global perspectives on ageing trends with each table focussing on a different region around the world; Africa, Asia, North America, South America and Europe.
The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society was held on Tuesday 28th October and was kindly hosted by Prudential and supported by Age UK.

The event was chaired by Axel Boersch-Supan (ILC-Germany), and we heard presentations from Christian Wolmar, Ian Pearson, Ruth Finkelstein, Geoff Green, and Sir Alan Greengross.

A number of important issues were identified during the event:


Transport is changing: change comes from a number of avenues; environmental, social, political, technological. There is therefore the potential for great improvements to the quality of life of older people as the new transport system which is developing could be designed to better cater to their needs. However, in many cases older people aren’t part of the debate about the future. Despite our ageing society, much of the investment in transport goes on large infrastructure projects, e.g. high speed trains and cross rail.

Conflicts of interest: whatever the area of change, we need to consider what the barriers to progress are going to be in terms of conflicts of interest or special interest groups and the huge costs involved in effective change.

ILC-UK now plans to develop some of the key ideas to come out of the event into a transport innovation workshop in January. This event will bring policy makers, transport experts and older people together to identify the changes that could, and should, be made to the UK transport system.

The presentation slides from this event are available to view
here.
As part of our annual conference, we held an internal joint meeting on the 28th October to discuss ongoing and completed research projects across the member organisations.

This meeting highlighted the success of a number of national projects in a range of areas, as well as updates on collaborative pieces that draw on the expertise and cross-national perspectives that make the Global Alliance such a valuable resource.

The meeting also featured a workshop to develop plans and strategy for a proposed joint project across the ILC members to explore the dynamics of retirement and health within the different social, political, and economic contexts of member countries.
The Post Development Goals 2015 dinner on the evening of the 28th October was supported by Age International. During the dinner we heard from Chris Roles (Age International), and Baroness Lindsay Northover (Lead Spokesperson for Department for International Development in the House of Lords) and Sir Malcolm Bruce MP (Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats).
On Wednesday 29th October we held a symposium on Ageing and Mobility, which was kindly hosted by the Local Government Association and supported by Alliance Boots.

This half day symposium showcased international research by ILC Global Alliance members on frailty and mobility in old age. The symposium was chaired by Louise Plouffe (ILC-Brazil), with presentations from Rosy Pereyra (ILC-Dominican Republic), Susana Concordo Harding (ILC-Singapore), Sebastiana Kalula (ILC-South Africa), Didier Halimi (ILC-France), Kunio Mizuta (ILC-Japan), Lia Daichman (ILC-Argentina) and Iva Holmerová (ILC-Czech Republic). Panel contributions were heard from Marieke van der Waal (ILC-Netherlands) and Jayant Umranikar (ILC-India).

The presentation slides from this event are available to view
here.
We were delighted to welcome the Secretary of State for Health, The Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP, to the Taking Forward the G8 Dementia Challenge lunch reception on the 29th October. During the reception, we also heard from Eileen Sills, Clinical Director for London’s Strategic Network for Dementia.
The final event of the conference, held on the 29th October, was the Robert Butler Memorial Lecture. Robert Butler, founder of ILC-US, was a passionate believer in the importance of health and productive ageing

This years lecture was on Productive Ageing and was given by Dr Ros Altmann, government’s Business Champion for Older Workers. The event was kindly hosted by the Local Government Association and supported by Pfizer US.

Dr Altmann's presentation slides are available to view
here.
This conference would not have been possible without the generous support from EY, Prudential, Age UK, Bupa, Age International, The Local Government Association, Alliance Boots and Pfizer US; all of the excellent Speakers and Chairs; and of course the delegates who were able to join us at the events.
 
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Future generations of pensioners face a bleak future unless Government addresses the long term challenges of working age poverty, argues the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK).

In 2012/13, pensioner households were less likely to be on a low income than households with working age adults or households with children. This marks a stark contrast to 15 years ago when low incomes were far more prevalent across pension households than working age ones.

The figures are set out today by ILC-UK as it launches its second annual Factpack on ageing and demographic change (Mapping Demographic Change). The Factpack has been developed as part of the #populationpatterns series supported by the specialist insurer Partnership. ILC-UK highlight that whilst pensioner poverty has fallen substantially, the future may not be so rosy:

  • Whilst 1.6 million pensioners are experiencing relatively low incomes, pensioner poverty has fallen drastically over the last 15 years. In contrast, the proportion of households with working age adults and households with children living on low incomes has remained relatively stagnant. Relative poverty among working age adults without children has increased.
  • The number saving into a pension has dwindled over the past decade from over 5.5 million in 2000 to 2.5 million in 2012.
  • For the first time in two decades, a higher proportion of 18-24 year olds are economically inactive than 50-64 year olds.
  • The average age of a first time buyer without family assistance is now 33 compared with 30 in 2008. The number of households renting privately has increased by 63% since 2001.

Last week, the Office for Budget Responsibility (Fiscal Sustainability Report) predicted that by 2063, age related spending will equal 25.1% of GDP compared to 20.4% in 2018.

Speaking at the launch of the Factpack, Ben Franklin of ILC-UK said:
“We have made fantastic strides with tackling pensioner poverty over the last 15 years. But future generations may not be so fortunate. A combination of high house prices, low levels of saving and working age poverty presents significant challenges for tomorrow’s pensioners. These are long term problems which require action now. Last week’s Fiscal Sustainability Report highlighted the future potential cost of ageing. Taking action now to reduce working age poverty could contribute to long term savings by future Governments”.

Richard Willets, Director of Longevity at Partnership added:
“Alleviating pensioner poverty is something that we all agree should be a priority. However, rather than simply concentrating on those who are in retirement at the moment, we also need to think about the longer-term future. Those who are experiencing working age poverty at the minute are less likely to be in a position to save, buy their first home and start a pension– all steps which can put them on the road to a more comfortable retirement.  Even with positive moves such as auto-enrolment, we seriously need to consider how we can do more to solve this problem and avoid storing up issues for the future.”

New research reveals extent of Grandparental giving

  • One-fifth of grandparents in England aged 50+ gave money to grandchildren – totalling over £647million in 2010
  • Grandparents who give are more likely to be homeowners than renters and more likely to have lower or no mortgage debt.
  • Caring for grandchildren increases the likelihood of giving money to them.

New research by the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK), supported by Key Retirement Solutions and Partnership, highlights how grandparents are playing a vital role in supporting the financial wellbeing of future generations.

This research is explored in a new report entitled “Grandparental Generosity” which looks at the levels and patterns of financial support from grandparents using the 2010 wave of the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA).  The research reveals that:

  • Just under 2.5 million grandparents in England aged 50+ (one in five) gave money to their grandchildren;
  • Contributions to Child Trust Funds (CTFs), tax-free savings accounts for children available from 2005-2010, were made by a small percentage (3.99%) of grandparents;
  • Across England, grandparents gave a cumulative total of almost £333.8 million to their grandchildren in 2010. Contributions to CTFs were of a similar amount, at £313.8 million in total.

The report paints a picture of which grandparents are more likely to give financially to their grandchildren:

  • A higher proportion of grandparents aged 75-79 gave than from any other age group and 80-84 year olds gave the highest amount on average.
  • Grandparental givers are also more likely to provide care for their grandchildren, and be female and married rather than separated or divorced.

Grandparental givers are wealthier than non-givers
The research reveals that grandparental givers are typically well-off relative to non-givers reporting higher levels of income and financial wealth.  They also had substantially higher income from annuitized sources like private pensions. Degree holders gave a much larger amount on average compared to the other groups.

Brian Beach, Research Fellow at ILC-UK said, “This research reveals that millions of grandparents are providing financial support to younger generations. For grandchildren, these transfers are likely arriving at a crucial transition point, impacting educational and housing opportunities. As people live longer and society ages, grandparental giving may have an increasingly important impact on the social mobility of grandchildren.

Ged Hosty, Managing Director of Equity Release at Partnership, said:  “As families become increasingly financially stretched and time-poor, grandparents are stepping in more and more to provide support.  However, while this trend is to be welcomed as it helps to draw families closer together, it can put a strain on the grandparents finances that they may struggle to recover from. 

Therefore, it is vitally important that people consider all their assets – including their homes - ahead of retirement and take steps to ensure that they can provide as much help as needed without detriment to their own retirement aspirations.

Dean Mirfin, Group Director, Key Retirement Solutions said "It is evident that with extended generations increasingly amongst today's population that grandparents are opting to help with their grandchildren, not just in terms of time but also financially.

"Grandparents in many cases are taking a pragmatic view with regard to this financial support seeing it as inheritance at a time when money is needed most or has the potential to most influence the financial well-being of the rest of their families. For many being there to witness the impact of their support is a key driver to gift at the right times, and to direct how that support is used, and this is a trend we expect to see continue."

The research was presented at a lunch debate in the House of Lords on the 15th October 2013.

A copy of the report can be downloaded here.

Up to 1.7 million grandparents expect to have to contribute towards university fees. Around 364,000 grandparents have already contributed.

Grandparents are expecting to have to dig deep to help grandchildren afford university fees, reveals new research* produced by over-55s specialist adviser Key Retirement Solutions exclusively for ILC-UK.

The research has been published ahead of a major piece of academic research by ILC-UK, supported by Partnership and Key Retirement Solutions which will be published on 15th October and which explores the full extent of grandparental giving.

Growing Need:
The nationwide study found just under three per cent of grandparents have already helped fund fees – but that number is set to rocket to nearly 13% over the next 10 years.  Which means that one in eight grandparents – equivalent to 1.7 million over-55s - expect to have to help pay grandchildren’s university fees while at the same time funding their own retirement aspirations.

While UCAS figures** showed a nearly 8% drop (2011 to 2012) in university applications following the increase in maximum tuition fees to £9,000 a year, this trend is starting to reverse. Around 637,456 students applied in 2013 compared with 618,247 in 2012 which suggests that people are using other sources of funding – such as family - to meet these increased costs.

The older generation is aware of their grandchildren’s educational aspirations – and potentially expectations – with around 10% of those aged between 55 and 64 believe they will have to make contribution rising to 15% for over-65s.

Funding Sources:
Almost three-quarters (73%) of over-55s expect to dip into their savings to help grandchildren while around nine per cent will rely on investments.  However, despite benefiting from significant house price inflation only four per cent will use property wealth such as increasing their mortgage or equity release to raise the money.

Dean Mirfin, Group Director at Key Retirement Solutions (www.keyrs.co.uk), said: “Helping out family is a powerful motivation for grandparents and contributing towards university tuition fees is a reasonable investment of savings.

“The numbers of grandparents providing financial assistance for university tuition is set to rocket from current levels as the implications of the maximum £9,000 a year tuition fees become clear.

“With finances for the over-55s under strain from falling annuity rates and historically low savings rates taking on extra commitments requires careful thought and planning.”


David Sinclair, Assistant Director, Policy and Communications at ILC-UK added

“Boomer bashing, or blaming the baby boomers for the current economic challenges facing young people is becoming very fashionable. Yet what this research, and ILC-UK’s forthcoming work will reveal, is that older people are playing a significant role in supporting younger people through education.”

 

Notes
*  Consumer Intelligence interviewed 2,072 parents and grandparents for Key Retirement Solutions between August 16th and 20th 2013
**  http://www.ucas.com/news-events/news/2013/2013-cycle-applicant-figures-%E2%80%93-june-deadline

With 12.2 million grandparents in the UK, Noreen Siba (International Longevity Centre-UK, Managing Director) announced a new programme of work which will highlight the true extent of financial transfers from grandparents to grandchildren.

Speaking at a private debate on intergenerational fairness at the Conservative Party Conference, Noreen Siba said:

“There is evidence to suggest that grandparents play a pivotal role in the financial support of grandchildren but little is done to fully understand this phenomenon.  We must do more to recognise and maximise this vital contribution from the UK’s grandparents.  And our forthcoming research will aim to provide concrete facts to encourage a debate around how this should be done.”

The research, produced with the support of Key Retirement Solutions and Partnership will explore data from the 2010 wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) to understand the levels and patterns of grandparents giving money to grandchildren.  It will be published at an event at the House of Lords on 15th October.

Ahead of the publication of the full research, ILC-UK will also publish research (9th October) which highlights how grandparents are beginning to support younger people through University and how they believe they can afford this.

Ged Hosty, Managing Director of Equity Release at Partnership commented:  “While many people focus on the fact that today’s over-55s have benefitted from unprecedented house price growth, high levels of employment and relative economic stability, they don’t generally acknowledge the continued financial role that they play in many families.  We are delighted to work with the ILC-UK and Key Retirement Solutions to better understand this issue and encourage debate on this topic.”

Dean Mirfin, Group Director, Key Retirement Solutions added: “Our own research continues to show that grandparents are playing an ever important part in the lives of their grandchildren, not just in terms of family support but increasingly direct financial support, in particular through the use of housing wealth as well as through other means. We see the work undertaken by ILC-UK to investigate the role that grandparents financial support can and does have as being fundamental in understanding the financial impact of intergenerational gifting.”
 

Speaking at an ILC-UK meeting this week, Universities and Science Minister, The Rt. Hon. David Willetts MP urged the sector to consider how they can play a role in drawing different generations together.

David Willetts MP said "Universities support a mix of ages of students; but there should be more discussion in the sector about what role Universities can play in strengthening intergenerational relations."

The Minister continued: "The social contract is a contract across generations. We need to avoid creating an artificial generational war. It is not helpful if we build up a dangerous mentality which suggests that older and younger people are a threat to each other. We all just need to think a little bit more about the generations above and below us."

Baroness Greengross added "Isolation is a huge issue facing parts of the older population. Universities could play an important role in fostering greater contact and understanding between generations. Age is irrelevant to learning and encouraging older people into the sector will help support different generations to come together."

David Willetts MP congratulated ILC-UK on its important contribution to the evidence base on intergenerational fairness.

 

The ILC-UK launches publications considering intergenerational diversity among LGBT people

Between Autumn 2010 and Spring 2011, three intergenerational projects took place in different areas of England to promote solidarity and improve relations between different generations of the LGBT community. The ILC-UK in partnership with AGE UK have produced an evidence review examining some of the specific issues and challenges facing older and younger LGBT people and the potential for intergenerational work, a detailed evaluation report of the projects and a tool kit to highlight best practice and inspire future LGBT intergenerational reports.

The ILC-UK identified a series of outcomes and key learning opportunities arising from the projects:

  • Unifying a diverse community.
  • Reducing age stereotypes.
  • Development of social skills and confidence.
  • Development of practical skills.
  • Exposure of young LGBT people to older LGBT people role models.
  • Improved understanding of the needs of older and younger LGBT people.
  • Preservation and increased awareness of LGBT history.
  • Sharing life-course experiences.
  • Promoting the visibility of the LGBT community.

The ILC-UK also has made a number of recommendations for improving further the outcomes of future LGBT intergenerational work:

  • Further work is needed to understand the benefits of intergenerational work among the LGBT community.
  • The success of intergenerational projects is often dependent on involving existing youth and older people’s networks. Therefore they need to be preserved in a time of cuts.
  • The Localism Bill should include greater safeguards to ensure the rights of marginalised or minority populations are able to access amenities and services locally protected.
  • The ILC-UK call for a greater recognition of the value of soft outcomes that may result from projects such as LGBT intergenerational work.
  • The ILC-UK call for specific funding to be set aside for projects that aim to strengthen intergenerational relations.

The ILC-UK organised the launch of the reports on 19 October 2011. The event was hosted by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE and the speakers included:

  • Stephen Burke, Director of United for All Ages
  • David Roper, musician and also known as “Four Poofs and a Piano”
  • Dr Jack Watters, Vice President, External Medical Affairs, Pfizer
  • Antony Smith, Development Officer - Equalities and Human Rights, Age UK

An executive summary and copies of the reports are available to download below:

ILC-UK joins the Age Action Alliance

International Longevity Centre - UK is joining dozens of organisations from across the voluntary, private and public sectors who are coming together to celebrate the lives of older people and address the challenges of our ageing society.

The Age Action Alliance, launched today to coincide with Older People’s Day celebrations, will work together to improve the lives of older people and help transform communities into better places to grow older.

As the first national initiative of its kind, the Alliance aims to improve the lives of the most disadvantaged older people, prevent deprivation in later life and challenge age discrimination.

It will build on successful projects developed by the voluntary and private sectors and Government programmes and will champion innovative ways of working to deliver practical solutions.

Prime Minister David Cameron has welcomed the launch of the Age Action Alliance:

"People are now living longer, more active lives and we must do more to reach out to older generations, not only to help the most vulnerable but also to better understand their needs and recognise the important role they play in society.

"So many older people take an active role in their local community that puts many of us to shame. I want to encourage others to follow in their footsteps, through volunteering and being part of the Big Society so we can all benefit from their experience, knowledge and enthusiasm.

"The launch of the Age Action Alliance will unite those working in this sector in celebration of the role of older people in this country and ensure their voice is heard at the very heart of Government."

Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Iain Duncan Smith said:

"Just as we recognise the real opportunities of an ageing society we need to be alive to its challenges. We have a huge number of organisations doing fantastic work to get older people engaged in their local communities – the Age Action Alliance is about getting them together, talking to one another, and sharing ideas about how social justice can be achieved for older people at a local level."

Michelle Mitchell, Charity Director of Age UK said:

“We celebrate the fact that not only is life expectancy increasing, but that also society’s view of retirement is changing. But there are still too many people not able to enjoy later life as much as they could, because they live on the edges of communities, often with little human contact. We want to see older people brought back into the heart of society and this is what the Age Action Alliance will work towards by bringing together the collective talents of the member organisations and the older people who help shape our work.”

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said:

“It is vital that we work on these issues which affect so many disadvantaged older people with a united front. ILC-UK is delighted to be part of the Age Action Alliance and to carry its messages to every level to ensure a better standard of living for older people living in the UK today, as well as celebrating the diverse roles older people play in our society.”

The vision of the Age Action Alliance is that it will be informed by older people themselves. It will tackle several issues relevant to older people, including public health and active lifestyles, safe warm homes, improving the lives of excluded groups, combating loneliness and isolation, working on age-friendly neighbourhoods, promoting digital inclusion and new attitudes to ageing.

Notes to Editors:

1. Over the last century, average life expectancy has increased by thirty years and will continue to increase. Fifty years ago one child in ten could expect to live to be 100, today it is one in four. In the UK there are now more people over State Pension age than children under 16.
2. The Alliance welcomes new members and believes its success will in part depend on a broad and diverse membership. For information on how to join the Alliance: http://www.ageactionalliance.org
3. Older People’s Day wants to change attitudes about ageing and older people and celebrate the valuable contribution that older people make. In its 5th edition, the theme for this year is “getting and staying active in later life”. The celebrations will include a range of events to showcase the talents of the over-60s, including dance and fitness classes, singing lessons, 5-a-side football matches and cookery clubs. http://www.direct.gov.uk/fulloflife
4. October 1st marks an important milestone for people who wish to work longer, as this is the date when the Default Retirement Age (DRA) legislation which allowed employers to compulsorily retire employees when they reach 65 will be removed. Further information on removing DRA is available on DirectGov www.direct.gov.uk/workingpastpensionage

 

A report by leading think-tank, International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and commissioned by poverty charity, Elizabeth Finn Care, finds that seven in ten aged over 65 felt they would be most affected by spending cuts, as did the same proportion of 25-34 year olds. Moreover, four in five over-65s think that spending on their age group should be protected – as did over seven in ten 16-24 year olds.

Today’s report, 'The Spending Review 2010: intergenerational perceptions of fairness, cuts and economic recovery' builds upon an earlier report by ILC-UK, Intergenerational fairness and the Spending Review 2010, which analysed the impact of potential cuts on health, well-being and poverty across the generations, and urged the Government to consider intergenerational fairness as it makes its decisions about spending cuts.

Survey evidence, presented in full in today’s report, shows that nearly two-thirds of people (65%) think that job creation should take precedence over reducing government debt. Concern for the economic prospects of today’s younger people trumps concern for future generations of taxpayers. Those from the lowest social class (partly skilled and unskilled workers) who are ‘very pessimistic’ about the UK’s economic prospects in the next decade was over double that of any other social class.

The survey also reveals that the public thinks that transport (63%), out-of-work benefits (54%) and defence (44%) are the top three areas the Chancellor should target for spending cuts. Interestingly, however, less than half of respondents from London chose Transport as a focus for cuts (48%), compared to almost three quarters of those from Wales (72%). This may be a direct reflection of the higher dependency on public transport in London.

Most people reported that they would reduce spending on clothes (73%), entertainment (62%) and transport (58%) if spending cuts affected their household income. Alarmingly, 31% of older people said they would consider cutting back on food in these circumstances.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK, said: “If the Government is to convince the public of the fairness of spending cuts, it is essential that no generation today thinks they will be worse off than others. Yet most people believe that their age group will be hardest hit, especially older people and younger people.”

Dr Dylan Kneale, lead author of the report and Senior Researcher at ILC-UK, said: “The Government’s argument on protecting future generations has failed to convince the public. People are clearly worried about the impact of cuts on jobs, with the poorest more worried than most about the country’s economic prospects. The finding that almost a third of older people intend to reduce spending on food if their household budget is hit by the cuts is particularly alarming.”

The report is available to download here

 

A report by the leading Think Tank, International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and commissioned by poverty charity, Elizabeth Finn Care, finds that nearly two-thirds of people (65%) think that job creation should take precedence over reducing government debt. The report urges the Government to consider intergenerational fairness as it makes its decisions about spending cuts over the next week.

A opinion survey published today, which forms part of a wider analysis of the potential impact of the Spending Review in the context of intergenerational fairness, reveals that the public thinks that transport (63%), out-of-work benefits (54%) and defence (44%) are the top three areas the Chancellor should target for spending cuts.

Moreover, four in five over-65s think that spending on their age group should be protected – as did over seven in ten 16-24 year olds. Perhaps unsurprisingly, a quarter of 16-24 year olds would target pensions for cuts, whilst just 15% of over-65s agree.

Somewhat counter-intuitively, younger people were also more likely (one third of 16-24 year olds) to target education for cuts than older people (one in five aged over 65).

The poll runs alongside a more in-depth analysis, in which ILC-UK sets out three principles for maintaining intergenerational fairness in relation to the Spending Review. First, it argues that it should impact fairly across different generations; second, that it should not exacerbate the causes of poverty in later life and lastly, it should not undermine the drivers of increased longevity.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK, said: “There is no doubt that the Chancellor will have to make some very difficult decisions over the next few weeks. There has been much talk in the media about the generational attitudes to spending cuts. But if the Government is to sell the merits of the Spending Review to all generations, it is essential that no generation today thinks they will be worse off than others.”

Dr Craig Berry, lead author of the report and Senior Researcher at ILC-UK, said: “Those born poor tend to be poor when they are older, and as such decisions about spending cuts must be taken in the context of a lifecourse approach. Unemployment is a key determinant of poverty, and initiatives to promote employment, skills and education must be protected, as far as possible.”

Download a copy of the report here.

 

ILC-UK has today responded to the interim report of the Independent Public Sector Pensions Commission. Chief-Executive Baroness Sally Greengross said:

"ILC-UK welcomes the publication of the interim report. Public sector pensions are a huge challenge within an ageing society. It is right that the coalition government addresses this challenge urgently, in an objective manner and based on evidence. In particular, we welcome the commitment to protect pensioners' accrued rights. However, using higher contributions from today's public sector workforce to fund exisiting entitlements risks undermining intergenerational fairness."

Our response is published in full in an article by Dr Craig Berry, Senior Researcher at ILC-UK and former Policy Advisor on pensions at HM Treasury (see below). In his article, Dr Berry argues in addition that moves towards raising the normal retirement age for public sector schemes, and away from 'final salary' entitlements, should be cautiously applauded. As long as such measures do not allow the government to scale back public sector pensions provision through the back door, they could allow the public sector to pioneer a more flexible approach to work and retirement, and set realistic benchmarks for the private sector to compete with.

For any enquiries, contact ILC-UK: info@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440.

TOP STORIES

In May this year, ILC-UK conducted a study mission to Japan supported by our sister organisation, ILC-Japan, and funded by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation and the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation.

Two complementary research reports published today by ILC-UK have both found that physical and mental illness at younger ages can have a significant impact on employment trajectories in later life.

A new report from the International Longevity Centre (ILC-UK), ‘Public health in Europe during the austerity years’, has identified early warning signs that austerity will affect health outcomes for decades to come.

Innovative new programme revealed at ILC-UK’s flagship “Future of Ageing” conference London

Older people are spending an increasing number of retirement years living in poor health, according to new research from the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK).

The International Longevity Centre - UK hosts an annual full day conference to bring together representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society to discuss the Future of Ageing.

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