NEWS:

We are delighted to announce that our Chief Executive, Baroness Sally Greengross OBE has been awarded a special Lifetime Achievement award by the British Geriatric Society (BGS), on the occasion of their 70th anniversary celebrations.

At a ceremony attended by patients, members of the BGS, doctors, nurses and healthcare workers, HRH The Prince of Wales presented Baroness Greengross with the award for her contribution to improving services for older people, and her ongoing support for the BGS.

Baroness Greengross sits as a Crossbench Peer in the House of Lords, and serves as Vice-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia, and Co-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Ageing and Older People.

Press Release

Embargoed Wednesday 9th November 00.01

Current pensioners have managed to secure unprecedented leisure time but fail to enjoy the fruits of their labour  


Current pensioners have come close to achieving Keynes’ 80 year old vision of economic bliss – where people are able to capitalise on extended periods of leisure time[1]. But many have fallen short of his ideal because they are unable to remain active and spend their accumulated wealth. Meanwhile, future generations may be forced to work longer hours and experience a sustained reduction in leisure time.

Based on analysis of OECD and Bank of England datasets [2], the findings will be presented by ILC-UK Head of Economics, Ben Franklin, at the ILC-UK’s Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference today.

Those reaching retirement today have benefitted from falling working hours, earlier exits from the labour force and longer life expectancy. New analysis from the ILC-UK shows how this has translated into far fewer working hours over the expected lifetimes of adults retiring today:

  • An average of 23 hours per week for those retiring in the UK today versus 30 hours in 1970.
  • An average of 19 hours per week in France for those retiring today versus 34 hours in 1970.
  • An average of 21 hours per week in Norway for those retiring today versus 30 hours in 1970[3].

Mr Franklin will argue that despite the success in substantially reducing lifetime working hours and increasing leisure time, those in retirement are not necessarily “enjoying the abundance when it comes”.[4] He highlights ILC-UK research which finds that, on average, older people are “underspending”[5], that poor health prevents older people from doing what they want in retirement, and that most leisure time is taken up watching TV and later on, living at home alone.

Yet just as we get accustomed to shorter working weeks, the trend has started to reverse. New analysis of 300 years’ worth of data suggests that the post-World War II period was an economic anomaly characterised by high wage growth, substantial increases in the productivity of labour and in the successful diffusion of productive invention (see chart). Since the year 2000, growth in each of these areas has stalled meaning people have had to work for longer to keep the economy ticking over.

Speaking at the conference, Ben Franklin will say:

“Over eighty years ago, Keynes had a vision that people would work substantially fewer hours and have much more leisure time to use in meaningful ways – to “enjoy the abundance when it comes”. Yet while we reduced the number of working hours across the lifetimes of those retiring today and created extensive periods of adult life outside of the workforce, most leisure time in retirement is spent watching television and, later on, living at home alone. Poor health and disability remain significant barriers to economic bliss in retirement.

Meanwhile, weak economic fundamentals may mean that Keynes’ vision of bliss will slip further from the fingers of those in the workforce today, with slower productivity growth leading to longer hours in work. If, as the data suggests, it turns out that the period 1950-2000 was an economic anomaly rather than the new normal, this will have profound implications for the future leisure opportunities of today’s workers.”


David Sinclair, ILC-UK Director, also speaking at the conference, will set out a positive vision for the Future of Ageing. He will argue that we are at a tipping point where staff shortages, the increasing economic cost of ageing and poor economic fundamentals will force action by policymakers.

Speaking at the conference David Sinclair will say:

“Over the past decade public policy has started to respond to the challenge of ageing. Auto enrolment into pensions has got millions more people saving. We have seen falls in serious illness among older people over the past decade as well as, for example, falls in excess winter deaths. We have seen a growth in age friendly communities as our society slowly adapts to ageing.

We have begun responding to ageing but we are miles from where we need to be. Health and social care funding is inadequate to meet demand, too few people are saving an adequate amount for their retirement and most of us aren’t living as healthily as we should.

But while ageing may seem an impossible challenge for politicians, with political will and action we can ensure the future of ageing is a success rather than a threat to our economy.”


Speaking at the conference, Sinclair highlights 6 “silver bullets” for policy makers to focus effort on, pointing out that achieving change in all these areas is possible with leadership and political will.

The 6 ILC-UK silver bullets

  • Maximising the economic contribution of older people
  • Getting us healthy
  • Maximising the potential of technology and big data
  • Stop patronising old age. Treat adults as adults
  • Start talking about end of life
  • Let’s make ageing fun

Ends

Contact

David Eaton, davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk (07851042609), David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk (07543646992) or Ben Franklin, benfranklin@ilcuk.org.uk (07393325293)

Journalists who would like to attend the Future of Ageing conference should contact ILC-UK asap. Filming and interviews may be arranged with speakers.

Notes:

Copies of the presentation of new analysis by Ben Franklin are available for journalists from Dave Eaton at ILC-UK. They will be published on the ILC-UK Website after the event.

Copies of other presentations on the day will also be made available on the ILC-UK website after the Future of Ageing Conference.

The ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference (http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/) brings together representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society. Speakers at this year’s conference, being held in Westminster, include:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

On Friday 12th February 2016, the ILC-UK published a report based on the information presented at the 2015 Future of Ageing conference, guest blogs written for our Future of Ageing series, and research and analysis from ILC-UK.  The report is available on the ILC-UK website at www.ilcuk.org.uk

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

[1] John Maynard Keynes, The economic possibilities for our grandchildren (1930)

[2] The Bank of England's Three Centuries Macroeconomic Dataset Version 2.3 - 30 June 2016

[3] We used OECD data to estimate likely hours in work as a proportion of total expected adult life. This is total estimated working hours over a lifetime divided by the number of adult years. Adult years is calculated as current life expectancy at the point of retirement minus age of entry in the labour force (we use age 18 for year of entry since time series data on entry is not available for all countries).

[4] John Maynard Keynes, The economic possibilities for our grandchildren (1930)

[5] http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/understanding_retirement_journeys_expectations_vs_reality

Press Release

For Immediate Release 28th October 2016

New analysis shows 60s who join a gym more likely to join a religious group

Think Tank’s longitudinal analysis also found that over 60s who join a political party are also significantly more likely to join a religious group like a church, synagogue or mosque.

Ahead of their annual ‘Future of Ageing’ Conference on Wednesday, 9th November in Central Hall Westminster, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) have conducted new analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and found that over 60s who join a gym or a political party are more like to also join a religious group.

Analysis of ELSA records from 2004-2014 by ILC-UK Research Fellow Dr Cesira Urzi Brancati found that:

  • Over 60s who join a gym are 4% more likely to also join a religious group, even when accounting for the trend in older people becoming more active
  • Over 60s who join a political party are 8% more likely to also join a religious group

The analysis of older people’s behaviour also found that there has been a marked decline in the number of 60-70 year olds belonging to a religious group in the last decade. Since 2002, 65-69 year olds are 7% less likely to claim that they belong to a religious group; 60-64 year olds are 6% less likely to claim that they belong to a religious group.

The ILC-UK also found that belonging to a religious group has a small, but positive impact on 60-70’s sense of worth and happiness:

  • When asked, ‘On a scale from 1 to 10, to what extent do you feel things you do in your life are worthwhile’ 60-64 year olds who are members of a religious group reported an average of 7.9; the average for those not members of a religious group was 7.4
  • For 65-69 year olds, the average response for those in a religious group was 8.2; for the non-religious group, it was 7.6
  • When asked ‘On a scale from 1 to 10, how happy did you feel yesterday’, religious 60-64 year olds on average reported 7.7 whilst the non-religious group average was 7.3
  • For 65-69 year olds, the average response for those in a religious group was 7.9, whilst the non-religious group average was 7.6


As the Church of England considers dropping its legal requirements for weekly Sunday services in light of declining attendance figures,
ILC-UK analysis suggests that outreach programmes by religious groups looking to grow their congregations might best be focused on over 60s who have recently started hitting the gym or campaigning with their local political party (of any affiliation).

The ILC-UK’s annual Future of Ageing Conference will consider how the challenges posed by the UK’s rapidly ageing population will affect health and social care; housing; pensions and personal finance; and wider social issues such as the future of faith in our rapidly ageing society.

Dave Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs Officer, ILC-UK said:

Every aspect of our society and economy is affected by our rapidly ageing population. This analysis might suggest that efforts to boost membership across a range of organisations could be best focused on targeting a new generation of over 60s looking to become more active and try something new. Lord Carey, former Archbishop of Canterbury will be delving into the future of faith in an ageing society in more details at the ILC-UK’s annual Future of Ageing Conference this November.


Notes

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is organising its second annual all day conference on The Future of Ageing, on Wednesday, 9th November 2016 at Central Hall, Westminster.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO

Contact

For more information, contact Dave Eaton at ILC-UK on 020 7340 0440 or davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk

ILC-UK are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference. Further support has kindly been received from Action on Hearing Loss, Drink Wise, Age Well, and Lip Reading Practice.

The conference will take place at: Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

To purchase your ticket, please click here to access our 2016 event page.http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/the_future_of_ageing_2016

On Friday 12th February 2016, the ILC-UK published a report based on the information presented at the 2015 Future of Ageing conference, guest blogs written for our Future of Ageing series, and research and analysis from ILC-UK. To download the full report, please click here.

About ILC-UK

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

We also host an annual Future of Ageing Conference to assemble representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society to discuss how the UK can meet the challenges and the opportunities of a rapidly ageing society.

Since our August update, we have launched four new reports, including an analysis of future care sector workforce shortages in the context of Brexit, and a review of financial capability interventions and older people in retirement.

We have also opened bookings for a December event on new approaches to means-testing and funding adult social care, and limited spaces are still available for the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our LinkedIn Group.

 

ILC-UK's Future of Ageing Conference less than one month away

George Sinclair, age 9, explains the urgent need to address the challenges posed by our rapidly ageing society

The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference
Wednesday, 9th November 2016; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

Current confirmed speakers include:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • Dr Maragaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, and
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

For more information and to register to attend, click on the below link
ILC-UK 2016 Future of Ageing Conference

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

Further support has kindly been received from Action on Hearing Loss, lip reading practice and Drink Wise, Age Well.

We have a number of promotional opportunities for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference. For full details, please click here.

We are also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. If you would like to discuss sponsorship and the various packages in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Support the work of the International Longevity Centre - UK

As an independent charity with no core funding, the ILC-UK relies upon the support of our Partners Programme and individual research commissions to operate.

If you would like to support our work producing research and policy analysis and hosting around 50 free-to-attend events a year, you can now donate to the ILC-UK via the secure BT My Donate portal below.

Any support you can provide would be greatly appreciated, and will allow us to continue to address the greatest challenges facing Government and society in the context of our rapidly ageing society and demographic change.

Please click here to donate to the ILC-UK

 

ILC-UK Publications

Brexit and the future of the migrant social care workforce
In this follow up to ILC-UK's 2015 report ‘Moved to Care’, ILC-UK and Independent Age update the analysis of the future workforce shortages in adult social care in England to take account of the EU referendum result of the 23rd June.

Still not ready for ageing
The Ready for Ageing Alliance assess the Government's response to our rapidly ageing society and finds the UK is still not ready.Far from seeing sustained progress over the past few years, society is seemingly going into “reverse gear” in some respects.

What works? A review of the evidence on financial capability interventions and older people in retirement
Commissioned by the Money Advice Service and the UK Financial Capability Strategy, this report carried out an extensive scoping review to establish which financial education programmes designed to improve financial capability amongst older people are effective.

Pension coverage and pension freedoms: Lessons from Hong Kong
This think-piece looks to Hong Kong,  whose pension infrastructure is similar to the one emerging in the UK to examine the potential impact of the UK's recent pension reforms.

 

ILC-UK Events

Costing care: New approaches to means-testing and funding adult social care

Wednesday 14th December; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) - 18:30 (followed by a short drinks reception)
Staple Inn Hall, Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, High Holborn, London WC1V 7QJ

This ILC-UK, IFoA and Cass Business School joint event will launch a new paper which reviews the present and proposed formula for means-testing adult social care in England.

Chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK, the launch will include a keynote presentation from report author, Professor Les Mayhew, Professor of Statistics, Faculty of Actuarial Science and Insurance, Cass Business School, and a response from an expert panel of actuaries and related professionals.

Limited spaces are still available for this event.
Please click here to register for this event

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our August update, we have published analysis on how best to support tomorrow's workforce; addressing the persistence of poverty across Europe; the dilemma faced by central banks, and guest blogs from a variety of expert contributors.

Blogs written by ILC-UK researchers include 'Are immigrants driving down wages in the adult social care sector?', 'Coming soon to a welfare state near you? A universal basic income', and 'Creeping protectionism and population ageing: a lethal combination'. ILC-UK economists Ben Franklin and Dean Hochlaf have also published an ILC-UK Economic Insight report into the challenges facing central banks in the context of the economic 'new normal'.

Our guest blogs have included articles from Audley Chief Executive Nick Sanderson on 'Downsizing and the housing black hole', and from Claire Turner, Interim Director of Evidence at the Centre for Ageing Better on 'Ageing: the things we don't talk about'.

We have also published three guest blogs as part of our 'Future of Ageing' series: researchers from the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation have published on 'Developing and evaluating sustainable services in an ageing society'; Clare Bambra, Professor of Public Health Geography at Durham University has written on how 'Where you live can kill you', and Dr Marianne Coleman, Emeritus Reader in Educational Leadership as written on 'The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society'.

We also regularly publish our Friday Five: five key facts about issues related to ageing.

To read these and all our blogs, please click here.

 

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.


Confirmed speakers include:

  •  John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO


Contact

For more information, contact Dave Eaton at ILC-UK on 020 7340 0440 or davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Notes

ILC-UK are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

The conference will take place at: Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

To purchase your ticket, please click here to access our 2016 event page.

On Friday 12th February 2016, the ILC-UK published a report based on the information presented at the 2015 Future of Ageing conference, guest blogs written for our Future of Ageing series, and research and analysis from ILC-UK. To download the full report, please click here.

About ILC-UK

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

We ask difficult questions and present new solutions to the challenges and opportunities of ageing. We undertake research and policy analysis and create a forum for debate and action.

We also host an annual Future of Ageing Conference to assemble representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society to discuss how the UK can meet the challenges and the opportunities of a rapidly ageing society.

Application deadline - 8am, Monday 12th September

The ILC-UK is an independent, research led, think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and demographic change. Based in the heart of Westminster, much of our work is directed at the highest levels of government in London, Europe and internationally.

We are looking for an organised and proactive Office and Events Coordinator (Maternity Cover) who has experience both coordinating events and office administration. In return, you will gain valuable experience on a range of assignments: from coordinating the preparatory work for a high profile annual event, to independently managing the delivery of events in Europe, the UK and the Houses of Parliament; you will have real responsibility from week one.

You must have excellent communication and writing skills, with a high level of attention to detail. A good awareness of policy and politics would be advantageous. Candidates should have high standards of written and spoken English, and an ability to liaise with the suppliers, funders and general public alike. You should have a good understanding and interest in the work that the ILC-UK undertakes (www.ilcuk.org.uk).

Alongside coordinating our events programme, we are also looking for candidates who can ensure the smooth running of the ILC-UK office, from liaising with equipment suppliers, maintaining office equipment and liaising with the landlord, to monitoring annual leave, ordering stationery and arranging travel/ accommodation for staff.

The role will help to ensure that the office is running smoothly at all times and staff are provided with administrative support. It will ensure ILC-UK’s work reaches its target audience, through events, social media dissemination or engagement with parliamentarians and government. We are small enough for the successful candidate to have a major impact on our work but big enough to attract national media and political attention.

You must have a good knowledge of Microsoft Office programmes (MS Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint). Knowledge of Mailchimp and Eventbrite would also be advantageous. We are looking for someone who has a flexible attitude, who is comfortable working in a small team and who is able to learn quickly and adapt to new tasks with ease.

Personal Specification

  1. Essential: Experience of coordinating events and office administration.
  2. Essential: Good administrative skills.
  3. Essential: Ability to work independently in a highly-pressured environment and to tight deadlines in a small team.
  4. Essential: Strong written and oral communication skills.
  5. Essential: IT literate including Microsoft Office.
  6. Essential: Experience dealing with confidential matters.
  7. Essential: Experience of dealing with credit/debit card payments and petty cash.
  8. Essential: High level attention to detail.
  9. Desirable: Budgeting experience.
  10. Desirable: Worked in the Charity sector.
  11. Desirable: Experience of running events for parliamentarians, civil servants and policy makers.

Send a (maximum) two page CV and (maximum) one page covering letter to the Office and Events Manager at info@ilcuk.org.uk ensuring that the name of the position appears in the email subject field.

Hours
5 days a week, 35 hours (flexible depending on candidate)

Application deadline
8am, Mon 12th September

Duration of contract
12 months

Interview date
Thurs 22nd September 2016

Salary
£25,000 per annum (pro rata if part-time)

Start date
Tues 01st November 2016

Place of Work
Normal place of work will be at the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) in Westminster, London.

Please click on the below link to review the full Job Description for this position.

Documents:

Job Description - Office and events Coordinator (Maternity Cover) (PDF)

Get the free PDF reader


The Rt Hon. Stephen Dorrell, Chair of the NHS Confederation and former Secretary of State for Health and former Chair of the Health Select Committee, and Dwayne Johnson, Director of Adult Social Care, Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council have agreed to join our fantastic list of speakers at the Future of Ageing conference.

Dr Margaret McCartney, GP, author and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, will also present at the conference. Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho of the Department of Ageing and Life Course at the World Health Organisation will also focus on health and care issues, taking a more global perspective.

Conference attendees will also hear from:

  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre - UK
  • The Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2001

Join as at the Future of Ageing Conference on Wednesday, 9th November. Our Earlybird prices must end on 31st August, so sign up now to take advantage of this special discounted rate.

 

Since our June update, we have launched five new reports, including a landmark publication on the future of the UK welfare state; a report on the economic benefits of migration; and our annual factpack, which this year focuses on the state on the nation's housing.

We also extended the early bird rate for the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference to Wednesday, 31st August, and held our second national retirement income summit at the Chartered Insurance Institute.

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter, Facebook or our LinkedIn Group.


ILC-UK hosts the first Ageing Society pub quiz to launch 'The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack'

On Monday, 18th July ILC-UK hosted the first Ageing Society Pub Quiz to launch 'The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack', supported by FirstPort. Attendees competing across 13 teams tested their knowledge of everything from the issues surrounding an ageing society, to whether the cumulative age of ILC-UK staff was higher or lower than that of the current members of the Rolling Stones.

Thank you to everyone who participated!

 

ILC-UK Publications

The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack
Despite significant increases in the numbers of older people living alone, half of all older people with care needs haven’t made adaptations to their homes to make them easier to live in. Whilst specialist retirement housing can offer more adaptations and play a part in supporting downsizing, the report also finds that the retirement housing supply gap is set to worsen.

Measuring state effectiveness: an ILC-UK index
This technical report presents a new index for measuring State Effectiveness, and comparative performance analysis of countries across Europe. The report warns that 'silver welfare', the strategy of focusing spending on social protection for old age is the only strategy consistently associated with bad outcomes.

Towards a new age: The future of the UK welfare state
This landmark publication features contributions from more than 20 leading public figures on the reforms necessary to ensure the future of the welfare state. 'Towards a new age' provocatively argues that if governments make policy based purely to get re-elected, the welfare state could become so distorted that it might sow the seeds of its own demise.
A future of the welfare state thinkpiece

Innovate to Alleviate: Exploring how the role of an enhanced care worker could address skills shortages in the social care sector
This report, commissioned by the Department for Health, is the first to examine a newly developed role in the adult social care sector. The first scoping review of its kind, the report is a qualitative investigation compiled from interviews with individuals from all levels of the care home sector.

Immigration: Encourage or deter?
This report demonstrates that migration could boost the UK economy by £625 billion (or 11.4%) by 2064-65. It also finds that migration is likely to support the sustainability of government finances, and that raising the State Pension Age alone will not stabilise the UK's declining dependency ratio.

 

ILC-UK Events

Housing in an Ageing Society
Wednesday 12th October; 10:00 (for a 10:30 start) - 12:30; Legal & General

On Tuesday, 19th July we launched 'The state of the nation's housing', with the support of FirstPort.

This special half day event on Wednesday, 12th October will feature discussion and debate amongst industry experts and Government on the topic of Housing in an Ageing Society.

Speakers include:

  • Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, Newly appointed Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Communities and Local Government;
  • Nigel Wilson, Group Chief Executive, Legal & General
  • Dr Brian Beach, Research Fellow, ILC-UK.

This event is fully subscribed, and is operating a waiting list.
Eventbrite - Housing in an Ageing Society


The Second Annual Future of Ageing Conference
Wednesday, 9th November 2016; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

We are pleased to announce that since our June update a further two new keynote speakers have been confirmed for the Future of Ageing 2016. We have also extended our early bird rates until the end of August 2016.

Current confirmed speakers include:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Dr Maragaret McCartney, GP and regular contributor on Radio 4’s Inside Health, and
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

Further support has kindly been received from:

    

 

We have a number of promotional opportunities for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing Conference. For full details, please click here.

We are also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. If you would like to discuss sponsorship and the various packages in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our June update, we have published ILC-UK analysis on the reform of nursing bursaries and the end of Osbornomics, and a variety of blogs from expert guest authors.

Blogs written by ILC-UK researchers include an assessment of reforms of nursing bursaries, lessons from Asia and the rest of the world on maximising the potential of an ageing population, a summary of the Drink Wise, Age Well Inquiry and the end of Osbornomics.

Our guest blogs have included articles on getting young people saving (Michelle McGagh, freelance journalist); on why declining dopamine may explain why older people take fewer risks (Dr Robb Rutledge, Senior Research Associate, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL); and insights into the motivations of young and old voters in the EU referendum (Dr Stuart Fox, Quantitative Research Associate, Wales Institute of Social & Economic Research, Data & Methods).

We have also published guest blogs on combating ageism, fear and loathing in Brexit Britain (Jilly Forster, Founder, Forster Communications) and the difficult conversations people avoid as they get older (Claire Turner, Interim Director of Evidence, Centre for Ageing Better)

We also regularly publish our Friday Five: five key facts about issues related to ageing.

To read these and all our blogs, please click here.

 

Partners Programme

Membership of our Partners Programme is open to companies and not for profit organisations. Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

Partners are exposed to the latest available research and data in the UK, EU and the rest of the world. Partners are helped to understand and plan for changing societal trends and given opportunities to participate in cutting-edge debates to help them remain ahead of policy curves.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Centre for Ageing Better, Equiniti, EY, FirstPort, Hymans Robertson LLP, Legal & General, Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.


ILC-UK 2016 Conference
Wednesday 9th November 2016

ABOUT THE FUTURE OF AGEING CONFERENCE

This 2016 conference is the second in a new series of annual Future of Ageing conferences from the International Longevity Centre – UK. Our first conference sold out and was described by one delegate as ‘one of the best conferences I have ever attended’ . It was held in November 2015 and assembled experts from the fields of health, housing, finance and business to identify the challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing society.

Our 2016 conference aims to delve further into the future of ageing, focussing on:

  • The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society
  • The future of retirement income
  • The future of our economy in an ageing society
  • The future of our built environment in an ageing society
  • The future of ageing research

For more information about our 2015 conference, please visit the 2015 event page here.

To regsiter for our 2016 conference, please visit the 2016 event page here.

WHY YOU SHOULD SPONSOR THIS CONFERENCE

  • We are well known for our events, many of which have to operate a waiting list system as they get fully booked quickly. We were oversubscribed for our 2015 Future of Ageing conference.
  • This will be a unique opportunity to showcase your organisation and product to key decision-makers.
  • You will benefit from the conference publicity to promote your organisation.
  • You will have the opportunity to network with key decision-makers during breaks which will total over two hours.
  • You will benefit from any media coverage before and after the event.
  • You will receive visibility in the press and public affairs campaign to promote the event and the policy findings.
  • You will have the opportunity to shape debates and conversations by engaging in our extensive conference programme. The conference provides an area for stakeholders to meet, learn, discuss and share ideas with their colleagues and professional peers.
  • We will have a limited number of exhibition stands available providing you with great attention from delegates.

BE PART OF THE EVENT
Sponsorship Opportunities

We are offering you the opportunity to sponsor this conference and have four main sponsorship options available to choose from. See below for the packages we are offering. We would, of course, be happy to work with you to create a package that suits your budget and requirements.

To discuss sponsorship and your requirements in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell, Events Manager, on 0207 340 0440 or lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

Our third annual Future of Ageing Conference will be held in Central London on Wednesday, 29th November 2017.

Registration information and further details will be available here shortly, so do please check back regularly. We will also update this page with the latest news on keynote speakers for the third annual Future of Ageing Conference,

For information about previous ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conferences, please see below.

Wednesday, 9th November 2016, 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 16:50; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

On Wednesday 9th November 2016, we held our second annual International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) Future of Ageing conference  in Westminster, London.

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of the conference.

  • A full agenda from the day is available to view at the bottom of this page.
  • The presentation slides from the day are available to view at the bottom of this page.

We welcomed over 180 delegates at our second annual Future of Ageing conference, made up of business leaders; charity sector experts; public sector decision makers; local authority staff; academics; and senior journalists.

Our first conference, described by one delegate as ‘one of the best conferences I have ever attended’, was held in November 2015. The conference assembled experts from the fields of health, housing, finance and business to identify the challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing society. The Future of Ageing 2015 sold out weeks ahead of the event.

Speakers for the 2016 Future of Ageing conference included:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBE, Head of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society, ILC-UK
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, Author and Broadcaster
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP

Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority

Who attended?

  • Health and social care professionals
  • Pension and investment fund managers
  • Actuaries
  • Local authority officers: Service Commissioners, Housing Officers and Public Health teams
  • Charity sector representatives
  • Business leaders
  • Civil servants working across health, social care, housing and planning, pensions, personal finance and transport
  • Gerontologists, sociologists and other academics with an interest in the implications of our rapidly ageing society
  • Senior journalists: Finance, social affairs, consumer affairs and political correspondents

REGISTRATION FEES

Corporate Rate
£235+VAT (Early Bird Rate)
£299+VAT (Full Rate)   
          

Charity/ Not for Profit/ Uni /Individuals Rate
£155+VAT (Early Bird Rate)
£210+VAT (Full Rate)

Our early bird rates increased to the full rate from the end of August.

Members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme received a discount on ticket costs.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

We had a number of promotional opportunities available for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing conference:

  • Full Package – included exclusive sponsorship of the write-up from the conference, a full page advertisement space in the conference programme, company logo on the cover of the conference programme, exhibition space at the conference, free delegate spaces, and more.
  • Advertisement Package – included a half page advertisement space in the conference programme, exhibition space at the conference and company logo at the front of the conference programme and more.
  • Bursary places for older and younger lay people – sponsorship covered the travel and attendance of 20 older and younger lay people at the conference, exhibition space, shout outs on the ILC-UK social media platforms and more.
  • Exhibition package – included exhibition space at the conference, promotional materials in delegate packs, two free delegate spaces and more.

We were also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. More information is available here.

We were grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

ILC-UK Future of Ageing Presentation Slides - 09Nov16

 

Research from Cass Business School and the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) has found growing inequalities in adult life expectancy.

Based on data from the Human Mortality Database, Professor of Statistics Les Mayhew and Dr David Smith measured the differences in age between the earliest 10% of adult deaths and the top 5% of survivors.

They found that while people in the UK are living longer than ever, the gap between the longest and shortest lifespans appears to be increasing. In particular, the life expectancy of those in the lowest and the highest socio-economic groups is diverging for the first time since the 1870s.

The full report, An investigation into inequalities in adult lifespan, is published today.

It finds:

  • In England and Wales, 5% of men that have attained the age of 30 are living on average to 96.0 years, 33.3 years longer than the lowest 10%.
  • This gap grew by 1.7 years between 1993, when it was at its narrowest, and 2009.
  • It is the first time since the 1870s that the gap in life expectancy is widening
  • Unhealthy lifestyles are the main causes of this widening gap.
  • For women, the longest surviving are reaching 98.2 years-old, 31 years longer than the lowest. The female gap reached its narrowest in 2005, but has since levelled out
  • Men in lower socio-economic groups are most likely to make damaging lifestyle choices.

Report author Professor Mayhew said:

“We looked at data from the 1870s onwards comparing England and Wales with France and Italy. It was clear that the first half of the 20th Century was characterised by a narrowing of the gap in life span as everyone benefited from improvements in clean drinking water, better housing, higher incomes and better health. Despite general rises in life expectancy after 1950, the life expectancy gap between men and women widened whilst inequalities in lifespan persisted rather than narrowing further.

“We found that since the 1990s lifespan inequalities in men have actually worsened in England and Wales. This is partly due to some men now living to exceptionally old ages and in many cases equalling women but at the other end of the distribution there has been a lack of progress.  The research blames the widening disparity on poor life style choices rather than ambient risks which were prevalent in the first half of the 20th Century. Key amongst these is smoking, drinking and poor diet – choices that are more likely to be made by the poorest in society.

A previous UK Government set a target in 2003 that by 2010 inequalities in health outcomes should be reduced by 10% as measured by life expectancy at birth. Not only was the target missed but in fact the opposite has happened. The research concludes the answer is not so much about redistributing healthcare expenditure but more about changing lifestyle habits. The research argues that more powerful policy tools aimed at behavioural change are needed to steer people towards healthier lifestyles."

Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive added:

“This very timely report highlights how, despite huge increases in life expectancy, the gap between rich and poor is increasing for the first time since the 1870s. This trend is particularly worrying for society and policymakers must do more to begin to narrow this gap again. Preventing inequalities in ill health and disability must be a priority for policy action”.

Additional findings including comparisons to France and Italy:

- Male life expectancy in England and Wales at age 30 is currently higher than in either France or Italy, although the margin of difference post 1950 is usually about one year or less. Female life expectancy in France and Italy is currently higher than in England and Wales and has improved by greater amounts since 1950.

- In absolute terms the male age inequality gap is currently higher in France than in England or Wales which in turn is higher than in Italy. Currently it is 37.0 years in France as compared with 33.3 years in England and Wales and only 31.7 years in Italy. The fact that male age inequalities in Italy continued to narrow in period B by more than in period A is especially worthy of note.

- In absolute terms, the female age inequality gap is currently lowest in Italy, standing at 28.2 years as compared with 30.6 years in France and 31.0 years in England and Wales. The level of improvement in Italy and France since 1950 has been notably higher than in England and Wales. In Italy, for example, the gap closed by 5.8 years but in England and Wales by only 3.1 years.

- If gender differences in age related inequalities are compared, we find that the gap is currently bigger in France than in either Italy or England and Wales and that it also continues to widen. In England and Wales the gender gap in age inequalities has been the lowest of all three countries and remarkably similar throughout periods A and B. However, this similarity ceased after 1990 when the male gap started to re-widen.

Press Release

Future of Ageing bleak without better planning

A new report by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) argues that our ageing society offers significant social and economic opportunities but only if policymakers plan better for the long term.

The report, ‘Tomorrow’s World: The Future of Ageing in the UK’ describes the future challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing population.

The ILC-UK argues that our society is not adequately responding to ageing today:

  • The social care system is crumbling and health care is failing to incentivise the prevention of ill health.
  • The housing and planning system is failing to respond to ageing resulting in people living in housing which does not meet their needs.
  • Individuals are currently underestimating their life expectancy and risking running out of money in retirement.

ILC-UK point out that without action today, the picture in 10 years time could be much worse. The report predicts that average pensioner incomes will start falling as more people retire with a less generous state pension and without the benefit of final salary pensions.

If urgent action is not taken to address the challenges posed by population ageing, ILC-UK presents a future in which health expenditure has increased debt as a proportion of GDP to 180%; more than 1 million additional care workers are required to meet the demand for social care; and millions have failed to save enough ahead of retirement.

ILC-UK predicts that:

  • Without action to better support more disadvantaged social groups and communities, the gap in life expectancy between the wealthy and the poor will continue to increase.
  • Without action to address the current funding and workforce shortages in health and social care, the future needs of our ageing population are unlikely to be met.
  • Without action to better highlight how long people are likely to live, and the measures that they need to take to ensure financial security later in old age, even wealthier older adults may experience financial difficulties in later life.
  • Without action to encourage and facilitate longer working lives we will see a future drop in the UK’s employment rate and reductions in overall productivity.
  • Without action to build more houses, and houses which are adapted to the needs of older people, the housing shortage will continue.

The report proposes 10 long-term indicators of progress. ILC-UK plan to report against these indicators at their next Future of Ageing Conference on November 9th.

1. Health must find a way to be more responsive and preventative
2. Government must make progress in delivering a long term settlement to pay for social care
3. Savings levels for working age adults must increase
4. Average age of exit from the workforce should rise
5. The number and type of homes built should be increasingly appropriate for our ageing society
6. Government should make progress in facilitating greater risk sharing in accumulation and decumulation of retirement income
7. We must have a more informed older consumer
8. Our aspirations for retirement must be about much more than us spending more hours watching television
9. Businesses should better respond to ageing
10. We must strengthen the social contract between young and old

The report incorporates expert testimony from contributors at ILC-UK’s first Future of Ageing Conference which took place on Tuesday 24th November 2015. ILC-UK’s second Future of Ageing Conference will take place on Wednesday 9th November 2016: http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said:

‘If we want future generations of older people to age well policymakers must act now. The UK’s demography is slow to change and we can make some reasonable predictions and forecasts on how this may influence UK society over the next ten years. This gives us an opportunity to plan for the change we will witness. We can’t wait and hope ageing goes away. It won’t’.

Dr Michael Hutton, Chief Scientific Officer, Neurodegenerative Disease at Eli Lilly and Company Ltd said:

‘An ageing population is placing pressure on finite NHS resources whilst there are also important concerns about the quality of care, particularly for our elderly population in health and social care settings. The total cost of conditions such as dementia is huge. When assessing the scale of the problem, we must have a holistic understanding of the disease to ensure patients and their families are adequately supported and also to prevent a knock on effect to our economy, as this caring role prevents ‘carers’ from accessing other forms of employment’.

‘Innovation offers the NHS a real opportunity to meet the challenge of increasing demand on resources and squeezed budgets. Lilly was delighted to support this event and help develop ideas, to make the UK the best possible environment for supporting an ageing population’.

Lord Filkin, Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better said:

‘If we don’t build the social care workforce by some mechanism both in volume and skill we are in trouble. It is hard to overstate what a bad place we are in. The system is crumbling now. Social care needs to have increased investment: the increase in long term conditions in the older population will drive big increases in demand and cost’.

Professor Ian Philp CBE, Deputy Medical Director for Older People, Heart of England Foundation Trust said:

I think we can turn a concern about the costs of an ageing population into an opportunity to see growth, partly because so much wealth, asset wealth and disposable income sits with older people in our society. That wealth can be mobilised, for example to pay for major infrastructure projects through investment and return. We could turn it on its head from the apocalyptic tales of ‘we can't afford an ageing population’ to ‘my goodness what an asset’. 

Emma McWilliam, Hymans Robertson LLP said:

‘Grey hair is definitely something to be celebrated. That's easier to do when governments have applied wisdom to setting policies that encourage generations to save enough to enjoy retirement, as well as leaving a fair and sustainable legacy for future generations that we can be proud of. There is more that Government can do, both to safeguard future generations and to support people in retirement.

The Government's role in retirement should be to provide certainty through the flat rate state pension and act as an insurer of last resort for long-term care needs. To ensure those roles can be performed in a sustainable way, it's vital that individuals are clear about how much money they will have in retirement, how far off track they might be and what they need to do to get back on track. Talking about the 'savings gap' in general terms doesn't resonate with individuals.

They need to know how they will personally be affected. Technology is making that easier, and the government should pave the way to make that technology more readily available to greater numbers of people. Enabling a smoother transition into retirement through part-time working will also help address individuals' savings shortfalls, as well as deal with a potential future fall in UK productivity as we see greater swathes of the population ‘retired’.

Gary Day, Land & Planning Director from McCarthy & Stone, said:

‘The population is ageing rapidly but the UK’s housing stock is not coping with this change. There is a lack of choice when older people come to move to properties suitable for them in later life. This impacts negatively on a range of areas – poorer well-being, higher public spending on health and care, and blocked housing chains. We need to raise our focus beyond starter homes and encourage the building of more specialist housing suitable for older people across all tenures’.

Lord Filkin and Professor Ian Philp are available for further comment.

“Tomorrow’s World” has been made possible with the financial support of Eli Lilly.

Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk) on 020 7340 0440, or 07531 164 886.

Notes
ILC-UK’s first Future of Ageing Conference took place in November 2015.
Representatives from Government, business, academia and civil society gathered for the first annual Future of Ageing conference, hosted by the International Longevity Centre – UK ILC-UK.

Speakers included Baroness Altmann (Pensions Minister), Lord Willetts (Executive Chair, the Resolution Foundation), Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Officer), Lord Filkin (Chair, Centre for Better Ageing and former Labour Minister with responsibility for Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare), Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies), and Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, The Economic and Social Research Council).

ILC-UK’s second Future of Ageing Conference will take place on Wednesday 9th November 2016 http://www.futureofageing.org.uk/

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change.

Much of our work is directed at the highest levels of Government and the civil service, both in London and Brussels. We have a reputation as a respected think tank which works, often with key partners, to inform important decision-making processes.

Our policy remit is broad, and covers everything from pensions and financial planning, to health and social care, housing design, and age discrimination. We work primarily with central government, but also actively build relationships with local government, the private sector and relevant professional and academic associations.

There are a number of ways you and your oranisation can work with the ILC-UK.

  1. Fund research
    ILC-UK are funded by organisations interested in supporting our research programme.  To learn of current research opportunities contact Sally-Marie Bamford at sallymariebamford@ilcuk.org.uk
     
  2. Sponsor an event
    We are looking for sponsors for a range of forthcoming events including our second annual conference due to take place in late 2016. Contact Lyndsey Mitchell at events@ilcuk.org.uk for more information about these opportunities.
     
  3. Attend an event
    Our events regularly “sell out”. Check out our forthcoming events on our website.
     
  4. Join our Partners Programme
    ILC-UK runs a Partners Programme for companies, charities/ not for profit organisations, universities and professional bodies. Benefits include guaranteed spaces at events and a discount on research.
     
  5. Write a guest blog
    Have something you want to say about ageing and demographic change? Email us with your idea for a blog.
     
  6. Follow us on social media
    Follow us on twitter, like us on facebook, join our linkedin group and look at our slideshare presentations.
     
  7. Read our reports
    Last year we published 40+ reports. Take a look and let us know what you think.
     
  8. Send us your ideas
    We are always interested in your ideas for future research, events and policy analysis on ageing and demographic change.
     
  9. Share this with a friend
    Help spread the word about ILC-UK. Share this information with a friend and encourage them to join our mailing list.
     
  10. Come to our conference
    We are planning our second national conference to take place in late 2016. Keep an eye on our website for more information as it is finalised.


Companies pledge to lead the way in tackling the challenges of demographic change

A group of major national and international companies have signed an open letter and pledged to “work over the next five years to help make our ageing society and economy more sustainable”.

In the letter, the companies point out that “without action, our ageing society poses a risk to the UK economy and our business''. 

The businesses highlight that demographic change today means that we are “already witnessing shortages in critical parts of our economy“.

Whilst on the one hand, the business leaders recognise the potential of older consumers. They highlight that too few people are saving enough to have a good retirement. They also point out that having a healthy workforce will be key to addressing the UK productivity, yet point out that more investment in healthy ageing needs to be made.

The businesses signing the letter argue that “action by all of us over the next five years could make the UK a world leader.”

They point out that “companies have a big part to play in tackling the challenges of demographic change.  We can create jobs for all ages. We can help our workforce age well. And we can ensure our products and services are relevant for all.”

Next week, government, industry and voluntary sector experts will come together at the first national Future of Ageing Conference. The conference, organised by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) will seek to kick start a debate on the role companies have to play in helping us adapt to demographic change.

Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, ILC-UK Chief Executive said: “Businesses must play a significant role in helping us adapt to our ageing society. They need to create jobs for all ages, help UK plc improve its productivity and help people to plan better for their retirement. Businesses who grasp the demographic opportunity will reap significant financial rewards. Older consumers have significant purchasing power and reaping this potential will offer economic returns. It is in all of our interests that more businesses engage with the challenges and opportunities of demographic change”.

Jane Ashcroft CBE, CEO of housing and care provider Anchor said: "We must stop seeing our ageing society as a cost. Older workers can bring wisdom and experience in the same way older consumers are fuelling our economy. We have to act now to ensure a positive future for the older people of tomorrow."

Shaun Crawford, Global Insurance Sector Leader at EY: “EY fully endorses the critical role businesses have in creating and sustaining healthy workforces that deliver the benefits for employers, individuals and communities. EY’s own research has clearly established the link between wellbeing, productivity and performance. Taking care of physical and psychological health is critical to enjoying life;working at older ages to sustain household incomes and as longevity continues to increase, improving the proportion of this extended life in good rather than in poor health.”

Steve Groves, Chief Executive Officer, Partnership said: "Partnership is pleased to add its support to the ILC-UK led pledge to work towards helping make our ageing society and economy more sustainable. The challenges associated with demographic change are significant and it is important that these are addressed as a priority. With an ever growing older population, with few saving enough for a good retirement, it is essential that more is done to encourage and stimulate a pensions savings culture and equip people with the skills and interest to engage more in the process."

Gary Shaughnessy, CEO of Zurich UK Life, said: “Increasing life expectancy and chronic under-saving could leave many people facing a shortfall in retirement. The insurance industry is rising to the challenge by encouraging more people to save and developing new products that support them in later life. The Government also has a role to play by fostering a stable pensions system that incentivises long-term saving."

Douglas Anderson, Partner at Hymans Robertson and Founder of Club Vita, said  “Attitudes around the age at which we retire are turning on their head. The mass ‘early retirement’ programmes of the 1980s and 1990s are likely to be confined to the annals of history. Average life spans have increased by around four years since then. Importantly, there is growing evidence of the health benefits of working longer - and into what is currently considered ‘retirement age’ but in the future may not. Club Vita data shows that those who begin drawing pensions at 70 live a year longer than those retiring at 60. Gradual work-to-retirement transitions, instead of a clean break, look increasingly sensible to employers as well as employees. Employers should respond accordingly and make it easier for employees to phase down working avoiding a later retirement cliff edge. This would improve productivity, staff engagement and crucially also help prevent career blockages for younger generations keen to move through the ranks.”

Gary Day from McCarthy & Stone, the UK’s leading retirement housebuilder, said: “The population is ageing rapidly but the UK’s housing stock is not suitable to cope with this change. There is a lack of choice when older people come to move to properties that are designed for them in later life. This impacts negatively on a range of areas – poorer well-being, higher public spending on health and care, and blocked housing chains. We need to raise our focus beyond starter homes and greatly encourage the building of more retirement properties and housing suitable for older people across all tenures.”

Fiona Dunsire, Chief Executive Officer, Mercer said: “Mercer’s Age Friendly Employer Research showed only a fraction of companies have implemented ‘age friendly’ policies to help them retain and attract older workers. Tactics like age-specific wellness programmes, reviews of pay equity across comparable jobs across age bands, age discrimination checks, training targeted at older workers and line manager training are still only offered by a handful of employers. Employers need to be doing more to develop corporate policies that allow their business to tap into this talent pool. We strongly advocate that companies investigate their workforce planning need to establish the extent of the impact of an ageing society on their businesses.”

Martin Jones, Chief Operating Officer at Home Instead Senior Care, a UK national homecare provider which specialises in care for older people, said: “We are already committed to creating jobs for all ages. We have CAREGivers in their 50s, 60s and 70s whose life experience make them brilliant assets for our business which delivers relationship-led homecare for the UK's ageing population. We simply do not see age as a barrier to a career in care with us and we provide ongoing training to promote personal development, no matter what a person's stage in life."

Bruce Moore, Chief Executive of Housing & Care 21, said: “As a specialist provider of housing and care services for older people, we can see clearly the challenges that an ageing population presents to society, and the different ways in which we can work together to meet these challenges and make sure people can continue to enjoy healthy and active lifestyles in later life. We must also not lose sight of the contribution older people can continue to make to our society, given the right opportunities and support.”

Rachael Saunders, Age at Work Director, Business in the Community said “More and more employers are making the most of the increasing asset of skilled, knowledge able and networked people that longer working lives offer. Making the most of this asset does mean changing how workplaces operate – responsible businesses are leading the way”.

Colin Taylor, Chief Executive Officer, Key Retirement said: “As an organisation focussed on the financial wellbeing of our older population we wholeheartedly support this initiative by ILC-UK. As a company who specialises in financial advice and support for the over 55s we fully understand the importance of ensuring that as our society ages we must continue to innovate and provide financial solutions which give both genuine and tangible values to the wider ageing population.”

Signatories to the letter and pledge are:

Jane Ashcroft, Chief Executive, Anchor

Andy Briggs, CEO, Aviva UK Life

Nick Sanderson, Chief Executive Officer, Audley Retirement

Rachael Saunders, Age at Work Director, Business in the Community

Shaun Crawford, Global Insurance Sector Leader, EY

Jilly Forster, Chair, Forster Communications

Bruce Moore, Chief Executive, Housing and Care 21

Douglas Anderson, Partner at Hymans Robertson & Founder of Club Vita

Martin Jones, Chief Operating Officer, Home Instead Senior Care

Stephen Lowe, Group Director, Just Retirement

Colin Taylor, Chief Executive Officer, Key Retirement

Fiona Dunsire, Chief Executive Officer, Mercer

Gary Day, Land and Planning Director, McCarthy and Stone

Andrew Rear, Chairman, Munich Re UK Services

Steve Groves, Chief Executive Officer, Partnership

Phil Loney, Group Chief Executive, Royal London

Romana Abdin, Chief Executive for Simplyhealth

Gary Shaughnessy, UK Chief Executive Officer, Zurich Insurance plc

Denise Keating, Chief Executive of The Employers Network for Equality and Inclusion,
and Chair of the Age Action Alliance Healthy Workplaces Group.

Contact
Dave Eaton (davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk) or David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk). Tel 02073400440

Notes to editor

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) has organised the first “future of ageing” conference to take place on November 24th. During this event, signatories to the letter and the ILC-UK pledge will debate the role of business in responding to the challenges of ageing.

Other speakers at the event include Baroness Altmann (Minister for Pensions); Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science); Lord Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]); Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change); Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership); Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council); Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson);  Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust); Elaine Draper (Director, Accessibility & Inclusion, Barclays); Mario Ambrosi (Head of Communications and Public Affairs, Anchor); and Baroness Kay Andrews (Member of the House of Lords Built Environment Committee, Former Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) 2006-2009)

The pledge

We will work over the next five years to help make our ageing society and economy more sustainable.

The Open Letter

Our ageing society is of significant importance to UK plc. Without action, our ageing society poses a risk to the UK economy and our business. But action by all of us over the next five years could make the UK a world leader.

Companies have a big part to play in tackling the challenges of demographic change. We can create jobs for all ages. We can help our workforce age well. And we can ensure our products and services are relevant for all.

As business leaders we have a vested interest. We need skilled workers yet are already witnessing shortages in critical parts of our economy.

We know that a healthy workforce will be a vital part of addressing the UK productivity puzzle as our society ages yet society invests too little in healthy ageing.

We want tomorrow’s older consumers active in the economy yet savings levels are not likely to be adequate to allow many to enjoy the active retirement they want.

Next week, government, industry and voluntary sector experts will come together at the first national Future of Ageing Conference. The conference will kick start a debate on the role companies have to play in helping us adapt to demographic change.

As a group of companies, we will work with policymakers and key stakeholders the over the next five years, to make our ageing society and economy more sustainable. We urge other companies to join with us.

Jane Ashcroft, Chief Executive, Anchor

Andy Briggs, CEO, Aviva UK Life

Nick Sanderson, Chief Executive Officer, Audley Retirement

Rachael Saunders, Age at Work Director, Business in the Community

Shaun Crawford, Global Insurance Sector Leader, EY

Jilly Forster, Chair, Forster Communications

Bruce Moore, Chief Executive, Housing and Care 21

Douglas Anderson, Partner at Hymans Robertson & Founder of Club Vita

Martin Jones, Chief Operating Officer, Home Instead Senior Care

Stephen Lowe, Group Director, Just Retirement

Colin Taylor, Chief Executive Officer, Key Retirement

Fiona Dunsire, Chief Executive Officer, Mercer

Gary Day, Land and Planning Director, McCarthy and Stone

Andrew Rear, Chairman, Munich Re UK Services

Steve Groves, Chief Executive Officer, Partnership

Phil Loney, Group Chief Executive, Royal London

Romana Abdin, Chief Executive for Simplyhealth

Gary Shaughnessy, UK Chief Executive Officer Zurich Insurance plc

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) is organising its first major all day conference on The Future of Ageing, on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Baroness Altmann (Minister or Pensions);
  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science);
  • David Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]);
  • Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change);
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
  • Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership);
  • Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council);
  • Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson); and
  • Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust) will be speaking at the conference.

The conference will be chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) and Lawrence Churchill (Trustee, ILC-UK).

ILC-UK are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and Partnership for their sponsorship of this conference.

Bookings can be made through the ILC-UK website.

We are delighted to announce that Baroness Altmann (Minister of Pensions), and Steve Groves (Chief Executive Officer at Partnership), will be joining our list of speakers at the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November in London.

Other speakers include:

  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser and Head of the Government Office for Science);
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
  • David Willetts (Former Minister; Resolution Foundation; Kings College and author of The Pinch); and
  • Lord Filkin (Public Service and Demographic Change Committee; Ready for Ageing; Centre for Ageing Better).


'The Future of Ageing, an ILC-UK Conference' will be held on Tuesday 24th November at 20 Cavendish Square in London, 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) - 17:00.

 

WE ARE EXTENDING THE EARLY BIRD RATE UNTIL THE END OF SEPTEMBER

As a number of you may have been away during the summer break, and in light of the announcement today of these two new speakers, we have decided to offer our early bird rates for another month. The early bird rates will now be available until Wednesday the 30th September. During this time tickets will remain at:
£150 + VAT – Charity / Not for Profit / Students / Lecturers / Individuals
£200 + VAT – Corporate


Register to attend the event via the link below:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/the_future_of_ageing_an_ilc_uk_conference

 

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) for their sponsorship of the conference.

For more information about sponsorship opportunities, visit the ILC-UK website or contact Lyndsey Mitchell at ILC-UK on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk.

On the 24th November 2015, ILC-UK will be holding a day conference on ‘The Future of Ageing’. We will paint a picture of the future of ageing and explore the challenges and opportunities ahead.Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explore the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrow’s.

Register to attend the conference here.

We invite organisations to be involved in this event through various promotional opportunities, from exhibition space on the day and advertising space in the event programme to publicity and free delegate spaces.

During the conference, we will focus on five key areas: The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society; The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty?; The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing?; The future of our built environment in an ageing society; and The future of ageing research.

We are delighted to confirm that Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science), David Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]), Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change) and Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) will be speaking at the conference.

Promotional Packages are included the below table. However, we would be very happy to speak with organisations to put together a package that suits your requirements and budget.

To receive a full Promotional Opportunities brochure, or to discuss these opportunities in more detail, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell, Office and Events Manager at ILC-UK, on events@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440.

Welcome to the August edition of the ILC-UK Update.

At the end of November, we will be holding a one-day conference titled The Future of Ageing, We are delighted that Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science) and Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) will be speaking at the conference. More information about this is included below. Register soon to benefit from the early bird rates.

In July, we launched our 2015 factpack, 80 at Eighty, which was inspired by our Chief Executive Baroness Sally Greengross' 80th Birthday.

Previous ILC-UK research continues to appear in the press; this month our research was quoted in an article on divorce in later life in The Telegraph, a story about older drivers in The Daily Mail and an article on Government investment into driverless cars on Yahoo

These updates are sent every couple of months. If you would like to keep on top of our latest news, please follow us on Twitter.

 

Registration is now open for our 2015 conference.
Early Bird rates currently available

The Future of Ageing - ILC-UK 2015 Conference

Tuesday, 24th November 2015; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 17:00
20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

You are invited to attend the ILC-UK Conference, The Future of Ageing, on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London.
During the conference, we will paint a picture of the future of ageing and explore the challenges and opportunities ahead. Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explore the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrows.
We will explore five key areas:

  • The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society
  • The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty?
  • The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing?
  • The future of our built environment in an ageing society.
  • The future of ageing research

We are delighted to confirm that Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science) and Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies) will be speaking at the conference.

We are currently offering early bird rates until the end of August.
£150+VAT - Charity / Not for Profit / Students / Lecturers / Individuals
£200+VAT - Corporate

To benefit from these rates now, please visit the ILC-UK website.
The Future of Ageing - Early bird rates


We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone and Partnership for their sponsorship of this conference.

We are still accepting further sponsorship for the conference and packages include:

  • Exhibition space
  • Advertisement space in the conference brochure
  • Promotional materials in delegate packs

We are also happy to work with organisations to create bespoke packages. Please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on lyndseymitchell@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440 for more information. We look forward to hearing from you.

 

European Adult Immunisation Hub

ILC-UK plan to launch an online European Adult Immunisation Hub in the autumn.

The online hub, supported by Pfizer, will provide a platform for materials to discuss the role of adult immunisation in supporting healthy ageing. ILC-UK will be collating interviews and blogs as well as promoting evidence and news on adult immunisation.

For more information or if you would like to contribute content, please contact David Sinclair (davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk).

Keep up to date via Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

 

ILC-UK Publications

Opportunity Knocks: Designing Solutions for an Ageing Society
This report, which highlights the vital role of good design, technology and innovation, is a collaboration between the ILC-UK, the Institution of Engineering and Technology and the University of Cambridge’s Engineering Design Centre.

Summer Budget 2015: ILC-UK Policy Briefing
The Conservative’s first Budget as the majority party since 1996 was not without incident or surprise. This short briefing outlines the ILC-UK response to the announcements.

80 at Eighty. An ILC-UK factpack
Inspired by ILC-UK Chief Executive and founder, Baroness Sally Greengross, who turned 80 on the 29th of June this year, we have launched our new factpack, '80 at Eighty' giving 80 facts about life in your 9th decade.

At a cross-roads: understanding the future likelihood of low incomes in old age
In this new White Paper for the ILC-UK Centre for Later Life Funding we argue that “Recent successes in poverty reduction at older ages could be reduced to a footnote in history” in the absence of a long term strategy for later life funding.

Avoiding the demographic crunch: Labour supply and the ageing workforce
This new study by the CIPD, in collaboration with ILC-UK, reveals that the UK could face serious skills shortages over the next 20 years if employers don’t change their approach to workforce planning as our population ages and demand for certain services rises.

The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society
This project from ILC-UK and Age UK sets out the key transport challenges that are arising from the UK’s ageing population.

 

ILC-UK Events

Village Life: Independence, Loneliness, and Quality of Life in Retirement Villages with Extra Care

Wednesday 19th August 2015; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) – 18:00
followed by a drinks reception; London, SW1

On the 19th August, we will be holding a launch event of a new research report “Village life” which considers the impact of retirement villages on independence, loneliness and quality of life of residents.

The report incorporates a survey of residents and compares the sample with a comparable group of non-residents living in private housing.

The report has been produced with the support of Bupa and Audley. Anchor provided additional survey respondents.

During the launch, Brian Beach, Research Fellow at ILC-UK, will present the findings of the research and Nick Sanderson, CEO of Audley, and Jeremy Porteus, Director of Housing LIN, will respond.

This event is now at capacity with a long waiting list. If you have registered to attend but are no longer available, please let us know and we will release your space to someone on the waiting list.

 

ILC-UK and University of Manchester dinner debate - ‘Can integrated health and social care save money and improve services?’ supported by Independent Age.

Sunday 4th October; 18:30 (for a 19:00 dinner) – 21:00
Manchester (outside the secure zone)

In early 2015 it was announced that Greater Manchester will become the first region in England to gain full control of health spending, with 10 local authorities taking over a combined health and social care budget of approximately £6 billion.

This innovation in health care is a good opportunity to achieve joined up health and social care, a move which could improve financial sustainability of health systems as well as improving the health and wellbeing of populations.

This policy has the potential to improve the success of health innovations which have a focus on prevention. The priorities and responsibilities of local government are markedly different from central government, as it is local councils that fund other areas which may benefit from a preventative approach to health care, for example social care, housing and leisure facilities. There is therefore a direct economic interest for local authorities to, for example, delay admission into care homes, or reduce childhood obesity.

The reforms in Manchester provide a positive opportunity to take a preventative approach to health care, and are a significant opportunity to meet the challenge of the big, cross-sectional challenges resulting from demographic change.

But will the reforms deliver their promise? During this dinner debate we will consider

  • How can we ensure the devolution of health spending results in increasing focus on preventative health?
  • How can we maximise improvements in health and social care whilst also saving money?
  • How will we know if the Manchester initiative has succeeded? How should we measure success?
  • Where next for integration between health and social care?

This is a private, invitation only, dinner debate. For more information, please contact davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Other events in 2015

We continue to hold various events throughout the year. These are on a range of subjects, from transport in an ageing society to pensions to dementia.

To keep up-to-date with ILC-UK events, please continue to check the ILC-UK website on a regular basis. Public events will also be advertised to our mailing list.

If you have received this newsletter via a colleague and are not currently registered on our mailing list, you can do so by emailing us at events@ilcuk.org.uk, or by visiting www.ilcuk.org.uk.

 

ILC-UK Blogs

Since our last newsletter we have posted a number of interesting blogs on our website.

David Sinclair wrote a piece on The future of long term care spending in the UK. The post highlights the relatively small proportion of GDP which is spent on long term care in the UK, and warns of the false economy of squeezing social care budgets, in that it simply increases healthcare costs. This month has also seen David, in his post titled Lifelong Learning, write about the potential impact that cuts to spending on adult learning may have, with a focus on the UK’s productivity problem.

Following on from the launch of an ILC-UK report on innovation and technology in an ageing society, in Opportunity Knocks Helen Creighton writes that without improved productivity growth, healthcare spending as a percentage of GDO could more than double by 2064.

Riah Wilkinson wrote about Gill Pharaoh, a palliative care nurse, and her decision to opt for assisted suicide over growing old.

July has also published two guest blogs. John Lawson from Aviva wrote a piece on How to incentivise pension saving, arguing that using simple and familiar messages would make the concept easier to understand, such as rebranding tax relief as the Government contribution to pension saving. Kirsty Woodard write about The challenges of ageing without children, focusing on issues such as finance, management of money, low level support and a lack of an obvious power of attorney.

You can access the ILC-UK blog here; and the ILC Global Alliance blog here. If you would like to write a guest blog for us, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

 

Working with ILC-UK

PARTNERS PROGRAMME
We have revamped our ILC-UK Partners programme. Membership is open to companies and not for profit organisations.

Benefits of membership include: a discount on research, guaranteed spaces at events, your logo on 3 events and 3 reports per year, and advanced copies of ILC-UK research. We also provide information and advice consultancy services to our Partners and organise exclusive events.

The current ILC-UK Partners are: Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti Paymaster, Legal & General, Retirement Advantage, Partnership and Prudential.

For more information, see the new Partners Programme brochure or contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk. We are increasing the cost of our Partners Programme for new members in the Autumn so please get in touch as soon as possible if you are interested in joining.

RESEARCH AND EVENTS
Research and events produced by ILC-UK are made possible by funding from various sources. If you are interested in commissioning ILC-UK research or supporting an ILC-UK event, please contact David Sinclair, davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk.

PRESS
If you would like to receive ILC-UK press releases, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk and we will add you to our press release list.

  • Think tank urges continued focus on preventing ill health as research highlights that ill health and inactivity is not inevitable.
  • Age UK announce plans for annual “Greengross Lecture”

A new factpack published today by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) (1) illustrates the realities of living to 80 for the 367,000 people reaching the milestone age this year.

Inspired by ILC-UK Chief Executive and founder, Baroness Sally Greengross, who turned 80 on the 29th of June this year, 80 at Eighty (2) gives 80 facts about life in your 9th decade.

Across the world, the number of people aged 80 plus has increased from 15 million (1950) to 110 million (2011). By 2050 the number aged over 80 is estimated to reach 400 million.

This factpack incorporates new analysis by ILC-UK of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing by ILC-UK. 80 at Eighty reveals:

Many English 80 year olds remain very active…

  • In England over 16,000 people aged 80+ are still in paid employment.
  • People aged 80+ may be more satisfied with their sex lives, as 67.9% report the frequency to be about right, in contrast to 54.5% of those aged 50-64.
  • More than half (55%) of men aged 80+ are married (or in a civil partnership) vs. 21% of women.

But health problems are common…

  • Around 16% of those aged 80-84 have already survived a heart attack.
  • 49% of women and 38% of men aged 80+ are often troubled with physical pain.
  • 50.8% of men and 56.7% of women aged 80 and over report having a limiting long standing illness.
  • Over one in ten of those aged 80-84 have some kind of dementia

Alongside Baroness Greengross, Julie Andrews, the Dalai Lama, Woody Allen and Norman Foster turn 80 this year. Elvis would have been 80 this year.

80 at Eighty was launched at a reception hosted by Age UK this week. During the reception, Age UK announced plans for the introduction of an annual “Greengross” lecture.

Baroness Altmann CBE, Minister of State for Pensions said
“I welcome this year’s edition of the Factpack, building as it does on the high quality research that has been the hallmark of ILC UK’s work over a number of years. In common with much of ILC UK’s research, this usefully highlights the importance of addressing the challenges and opportunities of our ageing society. Improving quality of later life is an important goal which can benefit increasing numbers of people.”

Baroness Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive said
“It is brilliant to see how many 80 year olds remain active. There were 17 runners in this year’s London Marathon aged over 80.  But 80 at Eighty also highlights the day to day challenges faced by too many people into their 80s and beyond.
The priority for me, as I pass my own 80th birthday, is to focus policy effort on ensuring more and more 80 year olds are healthier longer. Growing numbers of people aged into their 80s and 90s is great news, particularly if we can better prevent the multiple illnesses that can destroy wellbeing in later life.

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director for Age UK said:
“It is fantastic that there are more over-80s in our society than ever before and that this age group is increasing more quickly than any other.

"Growing numbers of these people are making significant contributions to their families and communities - indeed to our country - and in the process they are dismantling ageist stereotypes about what it is to be 'old'.

"No one epitomises this better than Baroness Sally Greengross, who has had a long and distinguished career supporting older people that she shows no sign of giving up, and who herself is joining the over-80s club this year.

"Age UK is therefore delighted to announce that from 2016 we will host an annual Greengross Lecture in Sally's honour. Our intention is that the Lecture will champion later life and the person or people who have made a really big difference to it that year - a fitting tribute we hope to all that Sally has done and continues to do."

“Recent successes in poverty reduction at older ages could be reduced to a footnote in history” in the absence of a long term strategy for later life funding, argues ILC-UK in a new White Paper for the Centre for Later Life Funding.

“At a cross-roads: understanding the future likelihood of low incomes in old age” sets out the priorities for Government over the next Parliament.

In the White Paper, the think tank argues that a strategy for later life funding must:

  • Secure effective funding for adult social care
  • Implement the Dilnot reforms
  • Find ways of ensuring the provision of mass market financial advice
  • Develop default options for those who “sit on their pension pots and do nothing”.
  • Be clear around what constitutes the deliberate deprivation of assets within the context of the new pension freedoms
  • Incentivising downsizing
  • Support innovation in the equity release market
  • Support policy which extends working lives

The White Paper sets the agenda for the ILC-UK Centre for Later Life Funding, which  will explore these issues and trends over the coming year.

Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK Chief Executive said: “We are at a cross roads. There has been undoubted progress in reducing pensioner poverty, particularly at older ages, but we must guard against complacency. Continuing reductions to social care budgets could lead to ever rising levels of unmet need and thereby greater deprivation amongst the oldest old. Not all babyboomers are wealthy and the pension freedoms alongside an over reliance on housing wealth poses risks to future retirement incomes. For tomorrow’s pensioners, there is a huge question about whether they will be able to depend on the state to provide adequate levels of support given the rising fiscal pressures of supporting an ageing population.”

About the Centre for Later Life funding: This report is the first publication from The Centre for Later Life Funding, which in turn, sits under the guise of the ILC-UK. The Centre is, in part, a continuation of its predecessor body the Care Funding Advice Network (CFAN) – a coalition of organisations and individuals seeking to improve on the Care Act’s recognition of the need for financial advice.

The Centre represents a significant expansion in terms of scope and output to include policy briefings and research papers which consider not just questions about care funding but questions about funding retirement more broadly. And it will be focused on developing ideas and solutions to these questions. We think that the artificial separation of retirement funding from care funding is unhelpful given that long-term care can be one of the biggest costs that people face during their retirement years, and the new “cap” will not change that fact. We are grateful to all ILC-UK Partners who have made this possible.

A Commission composed of health and hearing loss experts have welcomed the long awaited publication of the Action Plan on Hearing Loss

Baroness Greengross, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK and Chair of the Commission, said

“The Commission and many others have been campaigning for quite some time for the publication of the Action Plan and I am heartened to see some of our previous recommendations have been taken forward and a real commitment to improve the access and delivery of hearing care services for patients.

However, we must continue to push forward opening up hearing services so that people can self-refer as this will increase accessibility and reduce the likelihood of people falling through the net.

We also feel that we need to detect hearing loss earlier and that is why the Commission in our last report called for a national screening programme for adults and for hearing loss to be built into health check –ups for those likely to be at risk of hearing loss.

Unlike sight loss, many people do not ever, or wait far too long, to get their hearing checked. On average, people wait 10 years – that is 10 years of potentially not hearing your loved ones and friends properly, or being able to enjoy your favourite TV programme.”

A previous report published by the Commission last year highlighted the perils of ignoring the individual, economic and social cost of hearing loss. The report presented new data to show not only the predicted growth in the number of people with hearing loss, which is set to account for almost 20% of the total population by 2031 [1], but also highlighted a £25 billion loss to the UK economy in potential economic output [2].

Notes to Editors
1. By 2031, it is expected that there will be 14.1 million people in the UK with hearing loss – accounting for nearly 20% of the total population.

2. We calculate that in 2013, due to lower employment rates for those with hearing loss than across the rest of the population, the UK economy lost £24.8bn in potential economic output. Using the ILC-UK’s economic growth model, we project that, if nothing is done to address lower employment rates for those with hearing loss, in 2031 the UK economy will lose £38.6bn in potential economic output.
 

The Charity Act’s reference to ‘need because of age’ is patronising and should be removed—new report

Removing the reference would help charities lead banishing age stereotypes and prepare for our ageing population, argues the final report from the Commission on Voluntary Sector & Sector.

Decision time, published today by the Commission, suggests this change as one way to make sure voluntary organisations are geared-up to combat ageism and avoid alienating older staff, volunteers and donors.

New analysis in the report estimates that volunteering and donations from people over 65 could grow by over £6bn in the next two decades, but warns that charities will miss out on this money without reforming the way it works with older supporters.

Decision time makes a range of suggestions aimed at the voluntary sector, funders and government, to help civil society negotiate the opportunities and pitfalls posed by the UK’s ageing population. These include:

  • Charities must adapt how they work with older volunteers and donors. Today’s retirees are more discerning and discriminating than ever before about giving time and money, and charities should maintain more interactive, reciprocal relationship with the people who support them
  • The voluntary sector should market itself as the ‘sector of choice’ for people shifting jobs in the last year before they retire. Charities could lead retraining for teachers, care-workers and other under-staffed professions
  • Government can support the efforts of charities by considering incentives to volunteer. This may include piloting tax breaks for volunteers or carer credits
  • Funders should pilot more early intervention projects, to identify the most effective work and prevent future problems before they emerge 

Exclusive analysis for the Commission estimates that, compared to 2013:

  • the value of charity volunteering by over 65s will be £15.72bn by 2033, an increase of £5.32bn
  • the value of charity donations by over 65s will be £3.49bn by 2033, an increase of £1.18bn

Professor Lynne Berry, Chair of the Commission, said:

‘By 2033, 1 in 4 of us will be over 65 years old. The voluntary sector achieves amazing things every day, but in the course of the last 18 months the Commission has found that there is lots to do if the sector is to cope with, and make the most of, our ageing population. It needs to act quickly.

‘Charities can start by looking at their own day-to-day practices: are older people just there to be helped, or do they play their part working with charities as well? Does the charity resemble the community it serves? And they can think about the current batch of older supporters and ask whether they are doing enough to maintain them as volunteers and donors for the future.

‘Most public discussion of the ageing population sees it as a problem, but it could be a brilliant opportunity for the voluntary sector to focus on the future and the impact it wants to have. Hopefully the ideas in our report will help kick-start those conversations’

Age at death will increasingly cluster in the 90s and the life expectancy of men and women will converge, according to a study by academics from Cass Business School in partnership with the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC UK). Over the coming decades, men in particular will live longer, increasing the need for the country to face the challenges of an ageing society.

Based on historical mortality data from England and Wales, Professor Les Mayhew and David Smith developed a new method for forecasting life expectancy which is outlined in their report, ‘A jam-jar model of life expectancy and limits to life’.  The results will be beneficial to individuals, government policy makers, pension providers and insurers as the new forecasts provide more certainty with which to plan.

Les Mayhew, Professor of Statistics at Cass Business School, said: “We expect that most future growth in life expectancy will come between the ages 70 and 90. Life expectancy beyond 100 years of age is increasing very slowly and so will not contribute as much as was previously thought.  As a result, the age at death will tend to increasingly cluster in the 90s and the age of death of men and women will converge.”

One of great success stories in the United Kingdom is that people are living longer and men’s life expectancy is catching up with women’s. Male life expectancy at birth is now almost 80 years, having advanced 14 years since 1950 thanks to reductions in smoking, a decline in hazardous occupations, better health care and higher standards of living.

This success presents the country with a huge economic opportunity if these extra years are spent in prosperity and good health, but significant economic danger if they are not.

Realising the full potential of older citizens of the United Kingdom will be central to the Government’s response to changing economic circumstances and the drive to build a strong, fair economy for the twenty-first century. However, the challenges posed by an ageing society come at a cost in terms of pensions, higher health and social care costs and infrastructural change.

Professor Mayhew said: “The increases in life expectancy also raises important questions, as later retirement requires a capacity to work for longer and it may also mean downsizing one’s home at an earlier stage, with significant implications for the housing market. As a result, we need better information about life expectancy at both the population and individual level to enable better decision making. Policies must be durable, especially anything to do with pensions, health and social care, or housing.”

Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre UK, Baroness Sally Greengross welcomed the report saying:
“Accurately forecasting life expectancy will be crucial in enabling the Government, society and individuals to properly and prudently plan for the future.  Higher standards of living and improving healthcare are clearly beneficial, however, an ageing population requires that detailed provisions are put in place”.

“For these reasons, I welcome this significant piece of research from Cass Business School in partnership with ILC-UK.  It is an important and timely contribution to stimulating the debate that is urgently needed around how society supports an ageing population”.

Professor Mayhew and co-author David Smith used a pioneering new mathematical technique known as decomposition - or the 'jam-jar model' - to produce contributions to life expectancy for each 10 year age band (e.g. 70 to 80). The method provides more certainty over which age groups are experiencing significant gains and more accurate information about possible limits to life expectancy.

Talking about the model, Professor Mayhew said: “Each decade of retired life can be imagined as a jam-jar which if filled to the brim with life years would give a maximum of 10 years. As each jam-jar approaches the brim, extra life years are transmitted to the next decade of life in a predictable wave-like fashion until all are full.”

To illustrate this, in 1950, when male life expectancy at 60 in England and Wales was 15 years, the contribution from the decade of life between 80 and 90 was only 9.1% of the total.  By 2009, when life expectancy was 22 years, this decade of life contributed 18.5%.

“We already know that average pension pots are small and now must last for longer. As a result, greater responsibility will fall on the individual to make choices, to pay for services and to seek help and advice. Therefore we need better planning tools, including approaches to life expectancy that we have pioneered here, to help to anticipate and mitigate these effects,” added Professor Mayhew.

Download a copy of the report here.

Councils must ensure that spending cuts and short term targets do not undermine long-term investment in the prevention of ill health in old age.

‘Public health responses to an ageing society’, published by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), with the support of Sanofi Pasteur MSD, explores the extent to which England’s public health structures are able to respond to our ageing population after the radical reforms introduced by the Health and Social Care Act in 2012.

The think piece argues that some localities are embracing the opportunities provided by their new public health responsibilities, by taking a life-course approach to health and by commissioning services that both encourage healthy ageing and improve the health of the current old.

But the think piece argues that some local authorities still need support to deliver effective policies in an area as complex and fast-changing as public health. It also contends that transferring responsibility to local authorities risks politicising the sector.

ILC-UK expresses fears that localism might deliver a ‘postcode lottery’, where the health services available depend on the agenda of the local government. The think piece also argues that the introduction of a system that pays on results may encourage a culture of short-termism and target-hitting at the expense of our society’s future health.

‘Public health responses to an ageing society’ finds that local authorities may face barriers which prevent them from taking advantage of any benefits created by the Act. The new system encourages greater collaboration between departments; however, some councils report that they are unable to exchange data due to data protection and organisational ‘security’.

Jonathan Scrutton, Senior Policy and Research Officer at ILC-UK, said “There is a huge invest-to-save argument. Early investment in preventing ill health in old age can reduce long-term care costs. Localism has the potential to transform public health and deliver better and more targeted services. But if local authorities are to maximise the long-term benefit of investing in preventative health, they must not get drawn into simply achieving short-term targets.”

The think-piece argues that local authorities know their residents best. They are also well placed to develop innovative health strategies as they can utilise resources from a wide range of different actors, both within local government and beyond it.

ILC-UK argues that to reduce costs and improve the public health of older people today and in the future, they should prioritise 8 areas as part of their local health and wellbeing strategies: smoking cessation, physical activity, nutrition, road safety, housing, loneliness, falls and immunisation.

In the report, ILC-UK argues that:

• Local health strategies should prioritise long-term health initiatives over short-term target hitting. For example, Ageing Well strategies could usefully focus on increasing physical activity earlier in life to ensure people have an active, healthy old age.
• Health and Wellbeing Boards should make use of local authority’s links into communities to maximise the potential of public health impact and to ensure that the voices of older residents are heard, and incorporated into health strategies. 
• The NHS Commissioning Board should monitor healthcare commissioning to support consistency of quality across the country and help reduce differences in healthy life expectancies. 
• Government should ensure that local authorities’ public health budgets continue to meet the needs of local citizens after the 2 year ring fenced period.
• Government should ensure that data protection and organisational security do not discourage information sharing between departments and stunt integrated working.

Working with The Prince’s Initiative for Mature Enterprise (PRIME) and Business In The Community, The Internation al Longevity Centre have published a major new report about the challenges facing older workers, The missing million: illuminating the employment challenges of the over 50s. This is the first in a series of three reports being published on this topic over the next year.

The research demonstrates that of the 3.3 million economically inactive people aged 50-64, approximately 1 million people have been made ‘involuntarily workless’ - pushed out of their previous job as a result of ‘shocks’, a combination of redundancy, ill health or early retirement. This has created a silent majority’, where millions of over 50s are not working but would like to and are not receiving the help they need.

The research also shows that if people aged over 50 are helped back into employment, it does not mean that younger people are ‘crowded out ‘of the labour market. Helping older people back into the labour market could also lead to a potential £88 billion boost to the UK GDP. Most importantly securing employment for older people will transform their lives and offer them the opportunity of a brighter, more secure future.

Two further reports will be published following this paper on employment solutions and benefits of maintaining an older workforce.

The Ready for Ageing Alliance today launches its manifesto for action entitled ‘Getting Ready for Ageing’.  The report calls on policymakers in Government and beyond to start engaging seriously with the trend towards longer lives, which is fundamentally changing our country and our world.

The Ready for Ageing Alliance was formed in 2013 following publication of the ‘Filkin report’  and its conclusion that we as a country were nowhere near ready for an ageing population. The aim of members Age UK, Alzheimer’s Society, Anchor, Carers UK; Centre for Policy on Ageing, the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK), Independent Age and Joseph Rowntree Foundation is to make the case for action to ensure that our society makes the most of our ageing population.

Our demography is changing significantly and quickly: by 2030 there will be 101 per cent more people aged 85 and over in England and 51 per cent more aged 65 and over, compared to 2010. Around one in three of all babies born in 2013 is expected to celebrate their 100th birthday. By the time of the next election, there will be 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK. This will rise to over 1 million by 2051


The Ready for Ageing Alliance believes that the growing numbers of people in later life are a cause for real celebration but that we need to do a lot more to respond to both the challenges and the opportunities that longevity brings.

The manifesto sets out detailed recommendations for public policy covering housing; health & social care; the economy and communities and calls for Government to take the lead, with a single point of contact, at Cabinet level, responsible for age and ageing policy.

It also targets some big 'policy own goals' that sees us as a country currently hurtling in the wrong direction in terms of getting ready for ageing. For example, it says we must:

- Stop seeing ageing as being just about older people - if we wait until we are 60 or 70 to prepare we'll have left it too late. That's why the Alliance wants everyone to be sent a pack at 50 giving information and advice.

- End age discrimination – Legislation has gone some way to preventing discrimination on grounds of age but bizarrely financial services are exempt and hidden discrimination remains in many walks of life

- Stop operating hospitals on a model designed for the past – Staff/patient ratios on hospital wards for older patients are often lower than on general wards, yet older people often need more help - e.g. to eat and drink

- Stop undervaluing the over 65s, who currently spend a massive £2.2 billion a week and contribute £61billion to the economy through employment, icaring and volunteering.

- Stop ignoring the fact that many older workers are forced to leave the labour market early.  Start building more flexible work opportunities to make it possible for family members of all ages juggle work and care for older relatives.

 

Caroline Abrahams, spokesperson for the Ready for Ageing Alliance said:

“Last month we set out how individuals had a responsibility to prepare for ageing. But the responsibility does not lie with individuals alone. Government is failing to recognise and address the long term challenges of ageing. Unless we wake up to the major challenges ahead we run the risk of poorer, more isolated pensioners, greater intergenerational tensions and an economy which is not maximising the potential of the older consumer.

"Our politicians need to 'wake up’ and respond to our ageing population. There are so many opportunities to be had from an ageing society but without action now we will waste them."

"Longer lives are a great gift and Government must lead the way in getting us ready for ageing. There is no senior Ministerial post, dedicated unit or Cabinet Committee in place and never has been under any administration. We fear this reflects disinclination among policymakers to grip the issue and commit to action.

“We are hugely underprepared for an ageing population - the time to act is now.  In the run up to the election we want every political party setting out ambitious plans to prepare for the demographic changes facing the UK. At the very least we need to stop ageing being seen as just being about older people. We are all going to age and we all need to tackle these challenges.”


Contact: Liz Fairweather
Tel :0203 033 1718
Email: Liz.fairweather@ageuk.org.uk

The coalition urges individuals to keep fit, eat healthy, plan ahead and listen to a little One Direction.

The Ready for Ageing Alliance has set out an eleven point prescription to help individuals prepare for ageing. The Alliance, a coalition of 8 organisations, came together in 2013 to make the case for action to ensure that our society is ready for ageing.

The Ready for Ageing Alliance is publishing the prescription ahead of the launch of its Manifesto on 8th September 2014. The Manifesto will set out ideas for how policymakers can better respond to the challenges of ageing. 

The Ready for Ageing Alliance points out that our responsibility to age well needs to be supported by a series of rights. Policymakers must ensure that we are all well equipped to ensure we are ready for ageing. It argues that individuals need access to advice, services and opportunities for learning.

The Ready for Ageing Alliance calls for the creation of a “Ready for Later Life” pack, which would signpost people at the age of 50, to additional information and advice on preparing for ageing.

Ensuring you are ready for ageing? Eleven point prescription

Get fit: Keeping physically active is one of the most important things we can do to ensure a healthy old age. Learn to ride a bike or get out to the park. Not everyone can do a marathon, but most of us should keep fitter than we do.

Save for your old age: Yes, you will get a state pension. But for most people, it is unlikely to provide the sort of income you are used to. Saving is important at any age. But the younger we start, the greater we benefit from investment returns and compound interest.

Pay off your debts: Having debt can be a major barrier to preparing for ageing. Get advice from a charity such as Age UK or Stepchange and start planning for the future.

If you smoke, stop or cut down: Smoking reduces our life expectancy and can make it more likely that we suffer poor health or need care in old age. You are never too young or old to stop.

Be healthy: Eat a healthy balanced diet, drink enough water, and not too much alcohol. Be mentally active. Keep yourself informed about how you can prevent ill health and ask your GP if you need any adult vaccinations.

Plan ahead: Too few of us plan for the future. And planning for old age is difficult as few of us expect to suffer ill health, bereavement or a job loss. But a little thinking about how we respond to these challenges can make for a better old age. If we are to have longer working lives, it is unlikely that many of us will stay in the same job for a long time. We need to accept our careers may change and invest in careers advice and retraining. In addition, don’t be afraid of thinking about your own death, however far off it may be. Ensure you have taken out a Will and consider a Power of Attorney.

Keep your friends and make new ones: Isolation and loneliness in old age hits far too many people. Maintain friendships and build new networks and relationships across the life-course and into older age. And build relationships in your home community, not just where you work.

Adapt your home: As we age, we want and need different things from our housing. Our homes may have become too big or may no longer suit our needs. If this is how it is for you, think about moving home. Everyone should take opportunities to upgrade home energy efficiency.

Keep up to date with the kids: The world is changing around us. Keep your mind active and engaged, from new digital technology through to new attitudes. Make sure you aren’t missing out and take every opportunity to talk to younger people. Try to get yourself online. Listen to One Direction (at least once).

Talk about ageing: Ageing should be seen as a positive experience. Too few of us talk about ageing as anything but a passing joke. Talk to friends and family about this list.

See retirement positively: A time of change. A time perhaps of getting out more, taking more exercise, eating better, giving up smoking and making new friends. A time to have fun.

David Sinclair, Spokesperson for the Ready for Ageing Alliance said “We should all take responsibility for ageing well. But if we are to keep active, it is important to ensure there are services available to help us do so. If we want people to continue to be engaged as older workers or volunteers, we must end ageism. At the age of 50, everyone should be sent a sent a Ready for Later Life pack at 50, signposting them to information and advice on preparing for ageing.”

Charities will flourish or wither at hands of ‘super boomers’— New paper from the Commission on Voluntary Sector & Ageing.

The independent Commission on Voluntary Sector & Ageing, established by the think tanks NPC and ILC-UK, today warns charities to improve the way they work with volunteers, or risk losing the time and goodwill of the ‘super boomer’ generation.

The new paper, A better offer, warns:

  • UK charities urgently need to step-up preparations for the future, warns independent commission. ‘Without adapting, charities may find a large part of their voluntary workforce deserting them'
  • ‘Super boomers’ could be next generation of charity volunteers, but face unprecedented pressure to work longer and care for their families, with childcare a major burden reducing the time available to help charities
  • With volunteering by older people currently valued at £10bn a year, charities face an uncertain future unless they make a more compelling offer to potential volunteers
  • New survey data shows that larger charities seem to be weathering the storm—for now

Drawing on a series of discussions with volunteers and charities, as well as a survey of 12 of the largest charities in the UK, A better offer argues that volunteering can harness the talents of the most skilled and professionally experienced generation ever. It can also help solve social problems including integration and loneliness in older people.

However, charities will need to adapt or face losing out on these potential gains. A better offer raises concerns that charities are under-prepared to attract volunteers who will be more demanding than previous generations, and will already be committed to later retirement and the burdens of covering childcare for their grandchildren.

Charities also need to prepare for a period when demographic change will mean that there may be a shortage of younger volunteers, an issue of particular importance to charities who work with children.

The Commission also surveyed 12 of the UK’s largest charities, who collectively control hundreds of millions of pounds a year and work with tens of thousands of volunteers. Most reported that their volunteer numbers were up compared to three years ago—bucking a trend which has seen volunteering falling across the sector as a whole, and raising serious concerns about the burden placed on smaller charities. The surveyed charities also voiced their worries about the care duties and grandparenting roles that would eat into the time of potential volunteers in the future.

Dan Corry, Chief Executive of NPC and a member of the Commission, said:

‘Older people have traditionally volunteered for charities in their droves. Without the massed ranks of retirees who stuff envelopes and take minutes in meetings, thousands of charities would struggle to survive. But society in changing, and charities need to change with it. If we get this right the future looks rosy. But get it wrong, and act too late, and there’s a real risk that charities will find their volunteer army heading for the hills. Charities can start by considering the small things—getting older and younger volunteers to work together to share skills, making sure volunteers are better recognised for all their time and effort. Older volunteers are among the most generous volunteers, giving thousands of hours to causes they care for, often in menial tasks and with relatively little in return. But charities are naïve if they think that the next generation will put up with the same thing’.

David Sinclair, Director of ILC-UK, said:

‘The “baby” and “super” boomers may provide a new wave of volunteers who could greatly benefit the charity sector by bringing a plethora of skills and knowledge. This is a valuable opportunity and it is up to us to design roles that make use of these skills and build an environment which is attractive to volunteer in’

97% of the fall in annuity rates down to increased longevity and low investment returns

Many lifetime annuities offer fair value for money according to new research by Jonquil Lowe of the True Potential Centre for the Public Understanding of Finance at The Open University Business School.

The report, which has been published today by the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC-UK) also argues that the protection against longevity risk may be poorly understood by consumers.

Falls in annuity rates over the past 25 years mean that an individual who wanted to start retirement with a nominal income of £10,000 would have needed a pension pot of £65,000 in 1990 but over £175,000 by 2013. This has led to a commonly held view that annuities are a bad investment, which overlooks the insurance value of annuities, particularly in the face of increasing longevity.

The research confirms that the major determinants of annuity rates are life expectancy and long-term interest rates. A simple linear regression of UK level annuity rates for a 65-year-old man against a benchmark 15-year gilt rate and cohort life expectancy using monthly data over the period 1991 to 2013 explains 97 per cent of the variation in the annuity rate.

The research considers whether annuity rates can be considered actuarially fair (i.e. if the expected discounted present value (EDPV) of the income equals the price paid).

Lowe finds that some annuity consumers are getting more than value for money (Money Worth Ratio (MWR) of more than 1). For most people buying the best value annuities (average of the top three rates), the MWR at all ages for women and at ages 55 to 70 for men is greater than 0.85. This is within the usual range for MWR therefore does not suggest an excessive mark-up by providers.

Even the worst annuity rates generally deliver value for money to women, with the exception of those with standard life expectancy aged 75. The worst annuity rates offer poor value for money to men however; the exceptions being men with higher-than-average life expectancy aged 55 or 60.

The results suggest consumer detriment to those male annuity purchasers who end up on the worst rates, but otherwise a product that is generally delivering value for money.

Lowe argues that annuities should be viewed through a consumption frame, focusing on what can be spent throughout the remaining life course, suggesting that if advisers and individuals are using an investment frame, the focus will be on rate of return and investment risk, but not longevity risk.

The report sets out the implications of this research for pre-retirement guidance and advice

  • Guidance or advice must help consumers understand the nature of longevity risk and how to protect against it
  • Guidance may be needed more than once given increasingly flexible retirements, and the fact that individuals will be free to draw their pension savings in as many tranches as they choose
  • Should government go further and mandate advice for DC members who are contemplating giving up aspects of their retirement security? Is there an inconsistency given those on DB schemes who wish to transfer to DC schemes from April 2015 will need to take advice?
  • Will guidance be sufficient? Guidance is non-specific; does not advocate a particular course of action; and does not recommend the purchase, sale or alteration of particular regulated products from particular providers. It seems likely that many, if not most, individuals approaching retirement would need to be directed to an authorised financial adviser for regulated advice, which begs the question whether guidance has a role at all beyond signposting to sources of authorised advice?

Author of the report and lecturer in Personal Finance at The Open University, Jonquil Lowe said: “This much maligned financial product should ideally still play a key role in most people’s retirement planning and in the free, impartial guidance for every retiree promised as part of the government’s pension liberalisation package. A fall in annuity rates associated with increasing life expectancy does not equate to a fall in value for money ; rather it represents a spreading of value over a longer period.”

David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) added: “The research dispels the argument that consumers should automatically shun annuities on the basis of value for money. But given the gap between the best and worst annuities in terms of value for money, it is vital that we continue to encourage and support retirees to shop around in order to get the best value annuities.”

The report points out that annuities may not be the right option for everyone. Other strategies and products may be more suitable for those with higher risk tolerance, greater resources and/or a desire to leave bequests. Those with low resources who can expect a high proportion of their income to come from their state pension and those with debts may still prefer to forego a pension income for a lump sum.

Ends

Notes:
In its 2014 Budget, the UK government announced that from April 2015 its citizens entering retirement will no longer be steered towards using their tax-advantaged pension savings to buy a lifetime annuity (a financial product where a lump sum is exchanged for an income for life), or indeed to securing an income at all. Instead retirees will have complete freedom to draw out their savings whenever and however they like, provided they have reached at least age 55.

*If the EDPV equals the price paid then its ratio to price will be 1. This ratio is commonly called the Money Worth Ratio (MWR) and is a standard way of evaluating annuities. In practice, the ratio will normally be less than 1 since the insurer incurs costs including normal profit. If there is a lack of effective competition, the insurer might also be making supernormal profit, in which case the MWR could be substantially less than 1.

The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. We develop ideas, undertake research and create a forum for debate.

The Open University Business School (OUBS) is a leader in modern flexible learning and the pioneer of teaching methods that enable people to change their life goals, studying at times and in places convenient to them.  The OUBS is one of a select group of schools worldwide accredited by the three leading international accrediting bodies – AACSB, AMBA, EQUIS – hallmarks of quality of teaching, learning materials and qualification impact. It is the only triple-accredited business school that specialises in flexible learning and is home to more than 24,000 MBA graduates in over 100 countries. Its MBA programme offers both residential schools and face-to-face and collaborative learning options.

For more information, please see its website at www.open.ac.uk/business-school

The True Potential Centre for the Public Understanding of Finance (PUFin) is a pioneering centre of excellence for research and teaching related to personal finance capability. Based at The Open University Business School, PUFin is generously supported by True Potential LLP.

A Provocation launched today explores potential savings to the state if we were able to intervene successfully on the risk factors that cause dementia- these include physical activity, smoking, obesity and depression.

The International Longevity Centre–UK – the leading think tank on ageing and longevity – with Improving Care have modelled the impact of matching best practice interventions from global case studies on reducing six risk factors for dementia.

We estimate that over a 27 year period (2013-2040) this could prevent nearly 3 million people developing dementia in the UK – and would reduce the costs to the state in the UK by £42.9 billion between now and 2040 (minus any associated costs of intervention).

For example, if we managed to successfully reduce depression by 22.5% by 2040 (best practice intervention) this could prevent 22,000 people developing dementia and save the state £308million. Similarly if we managed to reduce type 2 diabetes by 58% through intensive lifestyle interventions, through weight reduction and exercise, we could potentially prevent 40,000 people developing dementia by 2040 and save the state £560million.

This Provocation links to the key messages of a study published in the Lancet Neurology today that argues one in three cases of dementia could be avoided by changes in lifestyle.

Baroness Greengross, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK and Chair of the Commission, said

“As Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia, and Chief Executive of ILC-UK, I am pleased that we are finally developing a credible evidence base to make the case for prevention and risk reduction for dementia. So few people are aware that there are actually lifestyle decisions you can make which could reduce your risk of dementia, such as stopping smoking, physical activity and a healthy diet.

With no cure for dementia, we need to do everything we can to reduce our lifetime risk of dementia and we need to make sure that people understand that dementia need not be an inevitable part of ageing, we can all help ourselves by looking after our heart health and in turn this should improve our brain health.”

This provocation aims to demonstrate what could be possible if we do try to tackle our lifestyle factors and when it comes to dementia arguably every number of cases which can be prevented must count.

Kieran Brett, one of the authors of the report, said:

“The priority that the Government has given to finding a cure for dementia is to be welcomed. This report today shows that alongside finding a cure, we can also develop a strong, evidence-based prevention strategy which will alleviate suffering and save £42.9 billion pounds by 2040.”

Dr Matt Norton, Head of Policy for Alzheimer’s Research UK, the UK’s leading dementia research charity, said:

“The research evidence on reducing the risk of developing some forms of dementia is growing. The recent Blackfriars Consensus Statement, signed by experts in the field including Alzheimer’s Research UK, has paved the way for dementia risk reduction to form part of our approach to public health. Now is the time to start championing the message that ‘what is good for the heart is good for the brain’ and this analysis from Improving Care and the ILC hints at what could be achieved. The potential impact is great, but we need further research to understand just how far we can go in preventing dementia and to help people take control of their own risk.”

Responding to today’s Fiscal Sustainability Report, Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) said:

“The future costs of our ageing society should rightly be worrying for policymakers. But they are not all inevitable.

If we don’t do much more to support longer working lives and aid innovation in health, care and financial services, our economy will certainly suffer. Future generations will not thank us for inaction today.

These figures highlight that the UK isn’t ready for ageing. Policymakers have some tough decisions to make but procrastinating is not helping anyone.

There is a role for all of us. That’s why, on the back of these figures, ILC-UK are delighted to announce the launch of a major two year project to explore how we can ensure the future sustainability of our ageing society. Learning lessons from across the world, SOS 2020 (Sustainable Older Society 2020) will set out a plan of costed solutions aimed at Governments, the private and the public sector.”

Local and national policy-makers are failing to ensure that our communities meet the needs of all ages according to a new report, Community Matters. Making our Communities Ready for Ageing.

Community Matters, published by the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK), with the support of Age UK, incorporates a 10 point call to action for local authorities to become ready for ageing.

The report argues that policy makers must work to ensure that communities do more than cater for our basic needs. It argues that communities should be places of fun for all. The report highlights the importance of supporting walking and cycling in old age as well as need to ensure housing is adaptable to an ageing society.

New analysis published as part of the report reveals that simply to keep up with anticipated population growth between now and 2037, we will need to build houses at the fastest rate since the 1970s.

The report explores the Government's plan for a new Garden City in Ebbsfleet and highlights ideas to make the new community "age friendly". Ideas include the creation of shared facilities for fun and play, and the introduction of Electric 'pods' to transport people around.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said "Our homes are not just places to live and our towns and cities should not just provide for our basic needs. We must have a bold and aspirational vision for communities in an ageing society.  Cities and towns must of course, meet our basic needs. Yet they are failing to do so. We are even failing to provide public toilets. But our aspiration for age friendly cities must be much greater than providing toilets.

Communities can reduce loneliness and isolation but we must make sure that services exist and well intentioned "safeguarding" does not prevent all ages from living, working and playing together. And we need community centres rather than "places to hire".

Good communities start with good housing. As well as building more, we need to build better.

Our society is ageing. Our communities could help us age well but they are simply not ready for ageing. We must build a new ambition vision of the community of the future. An older community, but also hopefully a more fun one.”

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director at Age UK says "Our population is ageing and it is essential that communities start to think now about how best to enable older people to get out and about and access essential services.  The alternative is that as we age we are increasingly stuck at home and cut off from the rest of society limiting our ability to enjoy life, to socialise and stay independent for longer. More toilets and seats will be essential for all of us but we should be more ambitious for later life and start building communities that do more than just work for older people but provide greater opportunities for participation”.

Malcolm Dean, who chaired the expert discussions added: "The last century saw major breakthroughs in dealing with the injuries of biological ageing. This new century needs to apply the same energy and commitment to resolving the injuries of social ageing - isolation, loneliness, and exclusion from too many community activities. The report is packed with simple and inexpensive new approaches to making neighbourhoods more 'age friendly'".

The report incorporates an ideas bank of recommendations in order to ensure that our Communities are "Ready for Ageing including:

  • Making our communities fun (swings at bus stops): Local authorities should support provision of desegregated apparatus for fun in outdoor spaces that includes people of all ages
  • Build more homes and ensure they are accessible and adaptable: The Lifetime Homes Standard should be made mandatory and Government should introduce a tax incentivised voucher scheme for housing adaptations.
  • Let us know about our housing options (a "last time movers" guide): Estate agents should be trained to better understand the potential needs of the older consumer and could better promote the Lifetime Homes Standard.
  • Get us walking: Replace the older people crossing road sign with a sign with more positive imagery promoting walking as part of later life. Develop budding services to encourage people to walk to town and services. Maintain pavements.
  • Get us on our bikes: Increasing numbers of cyclists across the life-course should be prioritised as a public health, environmental and social goal by Health and Wellbeing Boards and Local Authorities.
  • Ensure access to green space: Recognise the health benefits of access to green space, and placing some spending on green space under the umbrella of health.
  • Tackle loneliness and isolation: Community centres should protect time for local group activities to maintain the space as community resource (as opposed to a hall for hire). Safeguarding systems should not unnecessarily 'kill kindness' by stopping young and old working, living and playing together.

A new report from ILC-UK argues that increasing the state pension age without taking into account the 18 year difference in healthy life expectancy across the UK, risks disadvantaging groups of older people. 

The report “Linking state pension age to longevity: Tackling the fairness challenge”, published as part of the Age UK Research Fellowship demonstrates that measures such as healthy life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy vary significantly by region and social class, and in consequence particular groups are more likely to be disadvantaged by a rise in the state pension age than others.

  • While most people will live to state pension age and beyond, a large proportion are unlikely to reach state pension age in good health, particularly in some parts of the UK, with Glasgow City having a healthy life expectancy of just 46.7 years – a near 20 year deficit from the current SPA of 65.
  • Males in more disadvantaged areas and lower social classes are unlikely to reach state pension age free of disability, while those in the lowest social class have a disability-free life expectancy 13.4 years lower than males in the highest social class.
  • The additional benefits tied to the state pension age, such as the free bus pass, will on average, not be available to those from lower social classes until well beyond their healthy life expectancy.
  • Although life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy have increased over time for most groups evidence suggests that health gaps are continuing to widen. The difference in disability-free life expectancy between women born in the most and least deprived areas was 11.6 years in 2001-04. By 2007-10 it had increased to 13.4.  

The report also highlights how the disparity between life and healthy life expectancies may offset the perceived financial benefits of raising the state pension age:

  • Increasing state pension areas into ages where disability rates are higher, raises concerns about transferring spending from the state pension to disability and unemployment benefits.
  • Raising state pension age in line with life expectancy could result in increasing numbers of people leaving the workforce before reaching state pension age in order to care for friends and family. Currently it is a key reason why women aged over 50 leave the workforce.

The report makes a series of recommendations to policymakers, including to Government:

  • Five yearly reviews of state pension age, as detailed in the 2013 Pensions White Paper, should incorporate an examination of changes in healthy life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy as well as inequalities in these measures across different social classes and UK regions.
  • As state pension age increases, there must be continued investigation into the reasons for leaving work and retiring. This will help identify whether disability and poor health become a greater barrier to workforce participation as state pension age increases.
  • The recent increase in the proportion of employed men and women reporting a long term health problem or disability should be examined to explore what is driving these changes.
  • Health promotion strategies should target poorer social classes to ensure reduction rather than increases in health inequalities between classes.

Baroness Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK, said:

“As we live longer lives it appears to be a natural move to raise the state pension age. Yet as this research shows, we need to be very careful to ensure that increasing the state pension age doesn’t just result in an increase in the numbers of people out of work and ineligible for state pension. This report highlights that the highest social class are likely to live 13.4 years longer disability-free life than the lowest. Central and local Government must concentrate greater effort on tacking the causes of inequalities which result in such huge divergences in life expectancy”.

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director at Age UK, added:

"This research backs up what we've known for some time - that increasing the state pension age based purely on longevity will leave many people facing serious problems in later life. While it may seem reasonable to consider extending working lives as overall life expectancy increases, it will be especially tough on people with lower life expectancies – who are likely to be on lower incomes – who may end up with little or no time left in retirement to enjoy. Those who are unable to work longer due to ill health or caring responsibilities must be given the support they need, when they need it.

"The current Pensions Bill going through parliament should oblige government to take into account a range of factors before they consider raising the state pension age, such as the difference in healthy life expectancy and varying employment opportunities for continued working in later life.”

Ben Franklin, Research Fellow at ILC-UK and one of the report’s authors, said:

“This report demonstrates that raising the state pension age in line with life expectancy could have a number of unintended consequences. If increasing numbers of people leave the workforce before reaching state pension age – to care for loved ones or due to poor health – the economic and fiscal benefits of raising state pension age will be lost. And with such significant health inequalities across the UK, there is the very real possibility that the vast majority of people from some local authorities will fail to reach state pension age in good health. Improving the quality of life and not just the quantity of life is critical to ensuring that reforms to state pension age are successful in supporting longer working lives in a fair and equitable way.”

Paul Kitson, pensions partner at PwC, who will be hosting the launch event, said:

“As this research shows, not all pensioners are equal, the better off tend to live longer than those who are not so well off. While it is clear that state pension age needs to increase, the difference in healthy life expectancy between the different socio-economic groups raises questions over whether a one size fits all state pension age is the right answer.”

Notes

The report is available in the publications section of the ILC-UK website.

The report will be launched on the 10th February at the ‘Linking state pension age to longevity: Tackling the fairness challenge’ event being held at PwC, 1 Embankment Place, London. Minister for Pensions, Steve Webb MP will also be speaking on his plans for state pensions.

Age UK Research Fellowship

Age UK is funding a three year research fellowship at the ILC-UK. This fellowship allows us to undertake important research on ageing and longevity. Through the research fellowship, ILC-UK will undertake a number of pieces of policy and research work in agreement with Age UK. The ILC-UK is most appreciative of this opportunity given by Age UK.
 

The members of the Commission for the Voluntary Sector & Ageing have today been announced on the day as the formal work of the enquiry begins. The Commission was established by the charity think tank, NPC, in partnership with ILC-UK, and is chaired by Lynne Berry OBE. It aims to provide strategic thinking about how voluntary organisations in England can prepare for and adapt to an ageing society in the next 20 years.

The Commissioners have been selected to bring a range of perspectives and experiences and to reflect the fact that the Commission is not just about older people but also about the huge impact an ageing society will have on the voluntary sector. It is hoped that this forward thinking approach might, in turn, be replicated in other sectors. The Commissioners are:

  • Stephen Burke: Director of United for All Ages, a social enterprise that brings older and younger people together, and Good Care Guide, a website that enables families to review the childcare and eldercare they use.
  • Ken Burnett: Trustee of the Disasters Emergency Committee and founder and a managing trustee of the SOFII Foundation.
  • James Cochrane: Vice Chairman of Raleigh International , with a previous 30 year career in the pharmaceutical industry resulting in his appointment to the main Board of Glaxo in charge of international operations. 
  • Dan Corry: Chief Executive of NPC, previous Head of the Number 10 Policy Unit and Senior Adviser to the Prime Minister on the Economy.
  • Kristina Glenn MBE: Chief Executive of Cripplegate Foundation in Islington and Chair of London Funders.
  • Baroness Sally Greengross: Chief Executive of ILC-UK; crossbench (independent) member of the House of Lords since 2000 and chair of five All-Party Parliamentary Groups: Dementia, Corporate Social Responsibility, Intergenerational Futures, Continence Care and Ageing and Older People (Co-Chair).
  • Javed Khan: Chief Executive of Victim Support, a board member of the Sentencing Council for England and Wales, the Criminal Justice Council and a London Clinical Commissioning Group.
  • Keji Okeowo: Youth Participation Manager of National Council for Voluntary Youth Services.
  • Paul Palmer: Professor of Voluntary Sector Management and Associate Dean for Ethics, Sustainability and Engagement, Cass Business School.
  • Sonia Sodha: Head of Public Services and Consumer Rights policy at Which?, the Consumers' Association, where she leads their work on public services, health and social care

The Commission will draw together existing research, engage and consult the sector through a series of events, and work with voluntary organisations to develop answers as to how the sector can lead the way in adapting to an ageing population. It will publish its initial findings in March 2014 and an interim report in the run up to the 2015 general election. These will be followed later by a final report with recommendations for the future. The Commission will have three strands of work: building an understanding of how ageing will affect the sector; engaging the sector in thinking about the voluntary sector and ageing; and enabling the sector to respond and adapt. NPC and ILC-UK are also bringing together an expert panel to advise the Commission and ensure it is firmly rooted in the voluntary sector, including representatives from NCVO, Age UK, ACEVO and RVS.

Lynne Berry, Chair of the Commission for the Voluntary Sector & Ageing, said:

‘The scale and nature of the changes brought about by an ageing society will present significant challenges and opportunities for all charities and their funders. The fact that around one-third of babies born in 2012 in the United Kingdom are expected to celebrate their 100th birthday, and that so many people are living longer and healthier lives, is of course good news but we must prepare for the changes this will bring.

‘I am delighted that we have recruited so many wise and interesting people to sit on the Commission for the Voluntary Sector & Ageing, and I look forward to us putting our heads together and getting on with rethinking the future of the voluntary sector.’

Stephen Burke, Director of United for All Ages, said:

‘Our ageing society has implications for people of all ages and therefore for all voluntary organisations. Those implications range from the recruitment of volunteers and maintaining donations to the kind of society we want to build. Bringing older and younger people together will create a stronger Britain, but too often the voluntary sector segments people by age. I hope the Commission will challenge the voluntary sector to change the way it engages with people of all ages.’

Dan Corry, Chief Executive of NPC and member of the Commission on the Voluntary Sector & Ageing, said:

‘It is encouraging that we have got so many talented people on board with this Commission, a reflection of how important this work is. The whole sector needs to wake up to huge changes we will all face by 2033, and I believe that our Commissioners and members of the expert panel will help us prepare for the future.’

Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of ILC-UK and member of the Commission on the Voluntary Sector & Ageing, said:

‘As we move forwards with the Commission’s tasks, it is a privilege and a pleasure to be working alongside individuals with such expertise. The insight of the Commissioners into these issues will ensure that we are able to find strong, focussed answers to the questions around how the voluntary sector adapts to an ageing population.’

Ahead of the Commission’s first meeting today Lynne Berry will also give evidence to the latest hearing of the CAF Growing Giving Inquiry, which focusses on older people and giving.

Interviews available on request. For more information please contact NPC’s Media Relations Manager Vicki Prout at vicki.prout@thinkNPC.org or on 0207 620 4880 or 07764 746 631.

The Commission's website is here.

 

Up to 1.7 million grandparents expect to have to contribute towards university fees. Around 364,000 grandparents have already contributed.

Grandparents are expecting to have to dig deep to help grandchildren afford university fees, reveals new research* produced by over-55s specialist adviser Key Retirement Solutions exclusively for ILC-UK.

The research has been published ahead of a major piece of academic research by ILC-UK, supported by Partnership and Key Retirement Solutions which will be published on 15th October and which explores the full extent of grandparental giving.

Growing Need:
The nationwide study found just under three per cent of grandparents have already helped fund fees – but that number is set to rocket to nearly 13% over the next 10 years.  Which means that one in eight grandparents – equivalent to 1.7 million over-55s - expect to have to help pay grandchildren’s university fees while at the same time funding their own retirement aspirations.

While UCAS figures** showed a nearly 8% drop (2011 to 2012) in university applications following the increase in maximum tuition fees to £9,000 a year, this trend is starting to reverse. Around 637,456 students applied in 2013 compared with 618,247 in 2012 which suggests that people are using other sources of funding – such as family - to meet these increased costs.

The older generation is aware of their grandchildren’s educational aspirations – and potentially expectations – with around 10% of those aged between 55 and 64 believe they will have to make contribution rising to 15% for over-65s.

Funding Sources:
Almost three-quarters (73%) of over-55s expect to dip into their savings to help grandchildren while around nine per cent will rely on investments.  However, despite benefiting from significant house price inflation only four per cent will use property wealth such as increasing their mortgage or equity release to raise the money.

Dean Mirfin, Group Director at Key Retirement Solutions (www.keyrs.co.uk), said: “Helping out family is a powerful motivation for grandparents and contributing towards university tuition fees is a reasonable investment of savings.

“The numbers of grandparents providing financial assistance for university tuition is set to rocket from current levels as the implications of the maximum £9,000 a year tuition fees become clear.

“With finances for the over-55s under strain from falling annuity rates and historically low savings rates taking on extra commitments requires careful thought and planning.”


David Sinclair, Assistant Director, Policy and Communications at ILC-UK added

“Boomer bashing, or blaming the baby boomers for the current economic challenges facing young people is becoming very fashionable. Yet what this research, and ILC-UK’s forthcoming work will reveal, is that older people are playing a significant role in supporting younger people through education.”

 

Notes
*  Consumer Intelligence interviewed 2,072 parents and grandparents for Key Retirement Solutions between August 16th and 20th 2013
**  http://www.ucas.com/news-events/news/2013/2013-cycle-applicant-figures-%E2%80%93-june-deadline

New research from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) reveals 33% of all older people experience perceived age discrimination, with less wealthy older men being at highest risk.

‘Perceived age discrimination in older adults’ highlights the high levels of age discrimination faced by older people, a situation that worsens as they age. 26.6% of people aged between 52 and 59 reported age discrimination, a figure which rose to 37.2% for adults aged between 70 and 79.

The research reveals that the group at the highest risk of age discrimination are better educated, retired men with the low levels of wealth.

  • The poorest older people were 35% more likely to report age discrimination than the wealthiest.
  • Retired older people were 25% more likely to report age discrimination than those who were still employed.

The research also highlighted that older men faced higher levels of perceived age discrimination in many aspects of their lives in comparison with women.

  • 20.7% of men over the age of 52 felt that they were accorded less courtesy because of their age, in comparison to 15.2% of women.
  • 10% of men and 9% of women over the age of 52 felt that they had received poorer service or treatment from doctors or hospitals than younger people because of their age.

Professor Andrew Steptoe, Director, Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care at UCL said:

This research on a large representative sample of older people in England shows high levels of age discrimination. Around one in three men and women aged 52 and older report that they have been discriminated against because of their age, with higher levels in less well-off older people. It’s particularly concerning that around 10% felt that they had been discriminated against in health settings, while a similar number feel that they receive poorer service than younger people in shops and restaurants. Older people are an increasingly large proportion of the population, and we need to be more aware of the problem of ageism. Treating people of any age with respect and courtesy is good for society, and will help increase the wellbeing of senior citizens.

Jessica Watson, Research and Public Affairs Officer at ILC-UK, said:

This research reveals that millions of older people perceive themselves to be on the receiving end of age discrimination. We know from other research that the worries are not just perceived. For example, age discrimination in employment remains a significant barrier to working longer. We now have legislation in place to prevent discrimination on grounds of age, but this research highlights that we have a long way to go to change negative societal attitudes to age.

This research was produced as part of a joint PhD studentship between UCL and ILC-UK, supported by ESRC.
 

  • British public don’t believe Government is prepared for ageing demographic
  • Ready for Ageing Alliance encourages political leaders to take action

The Government is simply not ready to deal with demographic change, according to a poll of more than 2,200 UK adults.

Over three quarters (77 per cent) of people said the Government was not ready for the impact of an ageing population, and 76 per cent went on to say that there should be one individual in the Cabinet responsible for ensuring Government is preparing for our ageing society.

The poll, conducted by not-for-profit older people’s housing and care provider Anchor also found that 84 per cent of people think that more needs to be done to educate people about planning for and paying for care.

With the Conservative party conference due to start tomorrow (Sunday 29 September) the Ready for Ageing Alliance, of which Anchor is a founding member, has intensified its call for Government to plan for our ageing population.

Anchor’s Chief Executive Jane Ashcroft commented: “With crucial discussions taking place this week that will shape future policy, we want to remind the Government that dealing effectively with demographic change won’t just benefit the older people of today, but is crucial for a happier old age for future generations.

“We ask Government to prove to the public that they can future-proof policy. 137,000 people signed Anchor’s petition for a Minister for Older People. Government cannot bury its head in the sand on the issue.”

The Ready for Ageing Alliance consists of eight of the UK’s leading charities; Age UK, Alzheimer’s Society, Anchor, Carers UK, the Centre for Policy on Ageing, Independent Age, the International Longevity Centre - UK and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. The aim of the alliance is to ensure that the UK is prepared for the opportunities and challenges of an ageing society. 

The Ready for Ageing Alliance will have a presence at the Conservative party conference, encouraging political figures to discuss ideas on dealing with demographic change.

The Select Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change reported in March that government is “woefully underprepared” for our ageing society. A debate on their report is due to take place in the House of Lords on 17 October.

For more information or to arrange an interview with a spokesperson, please call 020 7025 7586 or 07838 163 369 and ask to speak to Beth Milsom, Kelly Mortlock or Victoria Mayman or email anchorteam@grayling.com

Using new data from UK’s largest ever social survey, Understanding Society, the Personal Finance Research Centre (PRFC) and ILC-UK have produced preliminary findings about the ‘oldest old’ (aged over 85) and their levels of participation, wellbeing and health.

This new analysis, funded by the ESRC’s Secondary Data Analysis Initiative, is part of a major project exploring the financial dimensions of wellbeing and wider quality of life measures in older age.

The new research reveals:

  • Around a third of over 85s said they were at least partly dissatisfied with their health, while over three-quarters (78 per cent) of the oldest old felt that their health limited even moderate activities, and about a half felt that pain had interfered with their activities over the past few weeks.
  • While over eight in ten of the oldest old (81 per cent) felt they could rely on family ‘a lot’, more than one in ten (13 per cent) reported not having any friends.
  • A worrying 26 per cent of people aged 85 and over reported being at least somewhat dissatisfied with their life overall. On the flip-side, three-quarters of the oldest old were at least somewhat satisfied with their lives.

David Hayes, Research Associate at PFRC said:
“This research is extremely important as we know relatively little about the experiences of those aged over 85. Yet this group represents the fastest growing sector of the UK population.

With around one in four over 85s at least somewhat dissatisfied with their lives, (much higher than in the general population), policymakers need to devote more time to the issues facing this group.”


David Sinclair, Assistant Director, Policy and Communications at ILC-UK added:
“This research paints a negative picture of life for far too many people aged over 85. 

The research backs up ILC-UK’s analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing last year which found that almost four in ten of those aged 85 or older faced some kind of social exclusion. Similarly, our research on centenarians published in December 2011 found that quality of life among the oldest old decreases with age and that the oldest old (aged 85 and over) are, as a group, at greater risk of poverty than younger older people (aged 65-85).

Bereavement and loneliness is a feature of later life for many.  Whilst our new research highlights that over eight in ten of the oldest old could rely on family ‘a lot’, more than one in ten reported not having any friends. Tackling loneliness and isolation in old age has to become a societal priority.”


ENDS

Governments must do more to reduce the long term cost of ageing to the public purse argues a new policy report from the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK).

“The cost of our ageing society”, sponsored by Milliman, highlights the projected financial impact of the cost of the world’s ageing population.

In the report, ILC-UK calls on governments across the world to consider linking eligibility ages of state pension to life expectancy and do more to ensure that the labour market is accessible to older people.

ILC-UK also argues that governments need to ensure pension systems are sustainable, allow for greater risk-sharing, and are less vulnerable to longevity risk. It also urges Governments across the world to consider how to create better conditions for health care innovation and development.

ILC-UK believes that governments need to prepare for uncertainty noting that “Policy makers today are being asked to prepare for a future about which there is a serious degree of uncertainty and therefore sustainable policies will be the ones which can adapt to unexpected changes.” It argues therefore that addressing the needs of ageing populations will require ongoing investment in research and data collection.

ILC-UK argues, however, that policy interventions must recognise the contribution that older people make to society and the economy. ILC-UK also points out that individual countries will need to ensure there are safety nets for those who cannot work longer.

“The cost of our ageing society” draws heavily on the European Commission’s 2012 Ageing Report (1) and the Office for Budget Responsibility’s Fiscal Sustainability Report, July 2012 (2)”. ILC-UK summarises the latest projections on longevity and the cost of ageing across the world.

  • In the UK:  age-related spending is projected to rise from an annual cost of 21.3% to 26.3% of GDP between 2016/17 and 2061/62, a rise of 5% of GDP (3) (equivalent to a rise of around £79bn in today’s money).(4)
  • In the EU: age-related spending is projected to rise from an annual cost of 25% to 29.1% of GDP between 2010 and 2060, a rise of 4.1% of GDP.(5)   However, a scenario which assumes greater resources devoted to development within health care projects that age-related spending in the EU could rise to as much as 29.8% of GDP, annually, by 2060. (1)

In the UK:

  • spending on public pensions (state pension, benefits and public service pensions) is projected to rise from an annual cost of 8.9% to 10.8% of GDP between 2016/17 and 2061/62, a rise of 1.9% of GDP (6) (equivalent to a rise of around £33bn in today’s money). 
  • spending on health care is projected to see the largest rise of all elements of age-related spending, rising from an annual cost of 6.8% to 9.1% of GDP between 2016/17 and 2061/62, a rise of 2.3% of GDP (2) (equivalent to a rise of around £36bn in today’s money).  The rise in projected spending on health care in the UK mirrors the increase in the ageing population. 

However, scenarios in which there were higher than expected levels of mortality, morbidity and health care development could see much greater increases in expenditure on health care. (2)

  • spending on long term care is projected to rise between 2016/17 and 2061/62 by 0.9%, from an annual cost of 1.1% to 2% of GDP, a rise of 0.9% of GDP (2)  (equivalent to a rise of around £14bn in today’s money). 

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK, said “Our ageing society will have significant impact on state spending on pensions, health care, long-term care and unemployment benefits. Across the world, people will need to continue to work longer as a result. In the UK and across the world we will also have to innovate in health and deliver a sustainable funding settlement for social care."

Emma McWilliam, Editor Longevity Risk and Consulting Actuary Milliman, said “Intergenerational collaboration is key, especially given high rates of youth unemployment.  If those at working age are not employed, simple old age dependency ratios do not show the complete picture to Governments on how best to deal with the challenge ahead. Additional measures such as Labour Market Adjusted Ratios, as set out by the European Policy Centre, that effectively encourage policies around employment are definitely a step in the right direction to build public policy that reflects the current demographics and needs of all generations in our future society.

David Sinclair, Assistant Director, Policy and Communications at ILC-UK, added “Governments across the world must not ignore the future costs of our ageing society. These costs won’t just go away. Drifting along is not an option and does not benefit future older or younger people. Policymakers must urgently look to solutions to the long term challenge of mitigating the increased cost of an ageing society."

Contact

David Sinclair or Jessica Watson at ILC-UK on 02073400440 or 07531164886


Notes

Baroness Sally Greengross and David Sinclair are available for interviews on this report.

On 16th October 2012, ILC-UK organised an event on “The cost of our ageing society”. This joint debate between ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession was sponsored by Milliman.

ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession, sponsored by Milliman, are organising a further event on “The cost of our ageing society”. The event will take place on 20th February in Edinburgh (16:00-19:00). If you are interested in attending please email events@ilcuk.org.uk

The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. We develop ideas, undertake research and create a forum for debate. http://www.ilcuk.org.uk

Milliman LLP is among the world's largest providers of actuarial and related products and services. The firm has consulting practices in life insurance and financial services, property & casualty insurance, healthcare, and employee benefits. Founded in 1947, Milliman is an independent firm with offices in major cities around the globe. For further information, visit http://www.milliman.com and uk.milliman.com.

References

  1. European Commission (2012) The 2012 Ageing Report. Economic and budgetary projections for the 27 EU Member States (2010-2060) European Union http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/publications/european_economy/2012/2012-ageing-report_en.htm
  2. Office for Budget Responsibility (2012) Fiscal sustainability report, July 2012  (OBR) http://budgetresponsibility.independent.gov.uk
  3. OBR (2012) Table 3.6, includes education
  4. GDP Projections by ONS, 2012/13 UK GDP- £1.57trillion, HM Treasury http://hm-treasury.gov.uk/data_gdp_index.htm
  5. EC (2012) These figures include education which is also affected by demographics
  6. OBR (2012) includes Basic State Pension, State Second Pension, Pension Credit, Winter Fuel Allowance and other benefits

Almost ten per cent of older people do not have a current account according to new research by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), and Age UK.

Furthermore, the report, ‘Is social exclusion still important for older people?’ found that among older people surveyed in 2002 and 2008, fifteen per cent of older people did not report having a current account at both points – the latest date for which figures are available. Six per cent of older people who reported a current account in 2002 no longer did so in 2008.

The report also found that older people were most likely to become excluded from financial products.  Between 2002 and 2008, 9.3 per cent of people aged 80 plus became excluded from financial products compared to only 2.1 per cent of those aged 50-59.

Older people from ethnic minorities were more likely to be excluded from financial products, such as private pensions and life insurance. In 2008, the odds of an older person from an ethnic minority being excluded from financial products were three times higher than the odds of a white older person.

Dr Dylan Kneale, Head of Research at ILC-UK, said: “While reporting errors may account for part of this effect, the results nevertheless show a surprising degree of instability in the use of financial products by older people. There is a need for more research to understand how and why exclusion from financial products is changing over time”.

To produce the new report, ILC-UK analysed the most recently available data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), which was collected in 2008, and examined how patterns of social exclusion changed since 2002. Social exclusion was measured across seven domains including exclusion from social relationships, local amenities, financial products, civic activities and access to information, decent housing and public transport, cultural activities, and common consumer goods.

The report also found almost a third of older people either no longer reporting any life insurance (23%) or reporting that they had taken up life insurance (7%) between 2002 and 2008. Overall, there was a 9% decline from 2002 among older consumers of life insurance to 42.7% in 2008.

David Sinclair, Assistant Director, Policy and Communications at ILC-UK, said: “This report shows that we should not be complacent about financial exclusion. Access to financial products is vital if broader social exclusion is to be tackled. The most disadvantaged are being hit hardest as a result of a lack of access to financial services and products”.

Michelle Mitchell, Charity Director General of Age UK, said, “This research suggests that older people have tried banking and perhaps sought access to other financial services and have found that they don’t work for them.  Many of these services are essential and so need to be designed with everyone in mind, including older people.

“Age UK hears from older people who want to use banking services, but can’t.  This can be because local banks have closed, call centres are inaccessible or simply because they find it very hard to get cash out.”

In the report, ILC-UK urges the development of initiatives and support programmes to encourage the development/uptake of financial products among disadvantaged older people.

NOTES

  1. The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. We develop ideas, undertake research and create a forum for debate.
  2. The report, ‘Is social exclusion still important for older people?’, will be available on 19th September on the ILC-UK website at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/is_social_exclusion_still_important_for_older_people Advan.ced copies are available for journalists.
  3. The report ‘Is social exclusion still important for older people?’, will be launched at a breakfast seminar on 19th September.
  4. Age UK is funding a three year research fellowship at the ILC-UK. This fellowship allows us to undertake important research on ageing and longevity. Through the research fellowship, ILC-UK will undertake a number of pieces of policy and research work in agreement with Age UK. The ILC-UK is most appreciative of this opportunity given by Age UK.

Contact:
David Sinclair, Jessica Watson, or Dylan Kneale on 02073400440 or 07531 164 886.

 

The number of people aged 50 plus being socially excluded from decent housing, public transport and local amenities rose sharply over a six year period, according to new research carried out by the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK) and funded by Age UK.

Over one in six people in their fifties (18%) were socially excluded in two of more areas of their life in 2008 – up from 13 per cent in 2002.

But the research also found that almost 38% of those aged 85 or older faced some two or more kinds of social exclusion, an encouraging decline of 10% from the 2002 levels. For those aged 60-64 years old, the figure was 12.4% experiencing two or more kinds of exclusion in 2008.

These findings were among the disturbing results from the research 'Is Social Exclusion still important for Older People?'

To produce the new report, ILC-UK analysed the most recently available data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), which was collected in 2008, and examined how patterns of social exclusion changed since 2002. Social exclusion was measured across seven domains including exclusion from social relationships, local amenities, financial products, civic activities and access to information, decent housing and public transport, cultural activities, and common consumer goods.

The report also reveals:

  • Rates of exclusion from decent housing and public transport and exclusion from local amenities rose sharply between 2002 and 2008 among the population aged 50 and above as a whole – by over five per cent to approximately sixteen per cent.
  • As people age, they are more likely to become more socially excluded than less– 23.9 per cent of people became more excluded between 2002 and 2008.
  • Almost two-fifths (38%) of those aged 85 and older were excluded from two or more domains of exclusion in 2008 – this compared with one-in-eight (12.4%) of those aged 60-64 years and one-in-six of the total sample (16.9%).

The report highlights how an older person’s demographic, socioeconomic and health characteristics were associated with whether or not they were socially excluded. For example:

  • Older men were significantly more likely to be excluded from social relationships while older women were more likely to be excluded from cultural activities.
  • Being non-white was associated with a higher risk of experiencing some form of exclusion compared to being white (59.8% compared to 47.3%). Older people from ethnic minorities in particular were more likely to be excluded from financial products, such as private pensions and life insurance.
  • Wealthy older  people are much less likely to be socially excluded than their poorer counterparts - with almost two-thirds of older people in the highest quintile of income were not excluded in any form compared to less than two-fifths of people in the lowest quintile (64.3% versus 38.7%).
  • Becoming a care giver between 2002 and 2008 was associated with a two fold increase in the odds of becoming excluded from two or more domains of social exclusion between 2002 and 2008. Those who assumed care-giving duties between 2002 and 2008 were more likely to become excluded from civic activities and access to information, excluded from decent housing and public transport, and excluded from common consumer goods.
  • Those who moved from living alone to living as part of a couple (with no children) exhibited a 68 per cent reduction in the odds of becoming multiply excluded (excluded on two or more dimensions) between 2002 and 2008 compared to those who stayed living alone; conversely, those who moved from being resident in a couple household to living alone were over three times more likely to become multiply excluded over this period. For this age group (50+), becoming a widow is one of the most common reasons for starting to live alone.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said: “Older people approaching retirement (50-54) appear to be worse off in 2008 compared to 2002. Whilst policy-makers have identified the squeezed middle classes as an at risk group, the squeezed middle age group is another at risk group. This report highlights the importance of taking a life-course approach to ageing. We need to intervene earlier to prevent social exclusion later in life.”

Michelle Mitchell, Charity Director of Age UK said: “While this report is welcome, it would be interesting to know more about why levels of social exclusion are rising for people in their fifties, something which the next wave of ELSA data might help us understand. For many being socially excluded can lead to feelings of loneliness which research shows has a significantly adverse effect on physical and mental well-being, equivalent in some studies to well established risk factors such as obesity and smoking.”

Dr Dylan Kneale, Head of Research at ILC-UK said “This report reveals the importance of helping older people access opportunities across a range of domains. We found that becoming excluded from social relationships, civic activities and access to information, cultural activities, and local amenities was associated with a lower quality of life, which in turn could have implications for older people’s health and other outcomes.”


In the report ILC-UK calls on the Government to:

  • Allocate the task of measuring and developing strategies to overcome material and non-material disadvantage a specific team within government.
  • Shift the focus of government policy on ageing towards prevention. ILC-UK argues that Government should focus on ‘ageing policies’ rather than ‘older people’s policies’ in order to tackle increasing exclusion among middle aged people
  • Develop a widowhood strategy. 
  • Better develop outreach provision to reach the hardest to reach before crises occur.
  • Improve planning of neighbourhoods for people of all ages to reduce levels of exclusion from local amenities and decent housing and public transport.
  • Provide additional support for carers and reduce gender inequalities in social exclusion through the expansion of existing intervention programmes.

NOTES

  1. The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. We develop ideas, undertake research and create a forum for debate.
  2. The report, ‘Is social exclusion still important for older people?’, will be available on 19th September on the ILC-UK website at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/is_social_exclusion_still_important_for_older_people Advan.ced copies are available for journalists.
  3. Age UK is funding a three year research fellowship at the ILC-UK. This fellowship allows us to undertake important research on ageing and longevity. Through the research fellowship, ILC-UK will undertake a number of pieces of policy and research work in agreement with Age UK. The ILC-UK is most appreciative of this opportunity given by Age UK.
  4. The report ‘Is social exclusion still important for older people?’, will be launched at a breakfast seminar on 19th September. 

Contact:
David Sinclair, Jessica Watson, or Dylan Kneale on 02073400440 or 07531 164 886.

ILC-UK calls for a national debate on the future of the care home

A new “futures” report, published by the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), argues that the care home of the future must become a ‘community hub’, delivering a range of services under one roof or in closely integrated neighbourhoods.

Launching the report, Baroness Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said:
“Our report highlights how care homes have improved over 40 years. Economic, environmental and demographic change will put increased pressure on the sector, as will the need to meet the increasing demands of the older consumer.

The care home of the future must be situated within the community it serves. Care homes should be considered less as a series of physical buildings and more as a model for delivering specialist care within a wider community. Funding models for the care home of the future must help facilitate this new community hub.

We need a public debate on what the care home of the future should look like and how we can all work together to deliver this vision.”

Paul Burstow MP, Minister of State for Care Services added:
"The care home has a future. I've always seen residential care as part of the mix in some people's care journey. At its heart the care home of the future will be the idea of 'home'. A place where relationships matter. A place open and outward looking, part of the community not closed, isolated and institutionalising. These ideas are part of the agenda for transformation I set out in the Care and Support White Paper last week."

Mike Parsons, Chief Executive and founder of Barchester Healthcare added:
“This year marks Barchester Healthcare’s twentieth anniversary. The care home has changed significantly since we launched our first home 20 years ago. The sector has adapted to many of the challenges highlighted in the ILC-UK report over the last 20 years. But we cannot be complacent. Societal change means the sector will need to continue to change to meet new challenges. Identifying and meeting local needs and engaging with communities local to our homes has always been a vital element of our approach to care homes. We take pride in our position at the forefront of the design of the care home of the future, which will continue to play a vital role in the delivery of care for older people and increasingly act as a hub for community support and the strengthening of community links.”

In the report, ‘Care Home Sweet Home’, supported by Barchester Healthcare, ILC-UK highlight the very significant challenges facing the care home sector over the next ten years including:

  • better engaging the community with care homes
  • making the most of the potential of new technology
  • finding a sustainable funding model for care which ensures that the care home can deliver quality personalised services
  • creating an informed care consumer
  • protecting vulnerable adults without over-regulating and thus stifling innovation
  • ‘chronic difficulties’ in the recruitment and retention of care home staff
  • ensuring environmental sustainability through, for example, better management of the consumption of energy and water
  • making the care home a real community hub
  • tackling societal ageism


The ILC-UK report considers how demographic, economic, technological, environmental and social change will impact on the care home sector. It explores how care homes of the future will fit in to the continuum of care, and how they can develop their services flexibly in order to respond to the changing aspirations and needs of 21st century consumers.

Publishing the report, ILC-UK set out recommendations for Government, the care home sector and the community as a whole. ILC-UK argue that:

Government will need to:

  • develop a funding system to adequately fund the care home of the future
  • ensure that funding is designed in such a way as to facilitate the development of personalised services
  • ensure that any new regulatory approaches to care home management do not inadvertently prevent innovation in care
  • find ways of ensuring improved communications between health services (e.g. GPs) and care homes
  • support innovative initiatives to fund energy conservation and the development of renewable energy in the care home sector

The care home sector will need to:

  • better market itself as a good career option for young and old
  • recognise the challenge of personalisation and find ways of better delivering a unique personalised service to the individual
  • reach out to the community
  • wisely introduce new usable and/or ambient technology to improve service delivery

The community as a whole will need to:

  • address endemic ageism, which creates a negative image of care and of older people
  • debate the ethical issues associated with an increased use of technology in care homes
  • find ways of using the care home as a hub
  • become more informed and more demanding consumers of care
  • introduce innovative ways of encouraging volunteering within care homes

ENDS

Contact
Jessica Watson or David Sinclair at ILC-UK on 02073400440

Notes

  • Spokespeople are available for broadcast interviews
  • Care Home Sweet Home will be published on the ILC-UK website (www.ilcuk.org.uk) on Wednesday 18th July. Advance copies are available for journalists from Jessica Watson at ILC-UK (jessicawatson@ilcuk.org.uk)
  • Care Home Sweet Home has been funded by Barchester Healthcare

Government should support the creation of new financial services products to better incentivise saving

The Government must develop a financial citizenship approach to long term saving argues the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK). A new think-piece, ‘Financial Citizenship: Rethinking the state’s role in enabling individuals to save’ supported by the Friends Provident Foundation, argues that the Government’s approach to long term savings has focused on responsibilities, but not rights.

The ILC-UK argue that the UK has a chronic under-saving problem, one which has been exacerbated by the financial crisis and economic downturn. The Think Tank states that there is an urgent need for policy-makers to address this problem.

Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of ILC-UK said
“We have a long term savings crisis in the UK. Far too few of us are saving enough for our long term needs. There is an important role for Government, the private sector and individuals.
We should move towards ‘matching’ contributions from the government, in place of tax relief, not least because incentives of this form are easier to target. Alongside this, the government could enable accounts allowing more liquid forms of long term saving for young people only, to help nurture a savings habit while recognising the particular circumstances of this life-stage.“

Dr Craig Berry, co-author of the report said
“At a basic level, citizenship implies that, in return for recognising our duties such as obeying the law and paying taxes, we have certain entitlements. We need a new approach to long term saving, one which takes on the principles of citizenship. A ‘financial citizenship’ framework would outline the respective responsibilities of individuals and the state regarding saving. While the current set of Government policies in place are not necessarily inconsistent with financial citizenship, nor are they adequate to support the vital need for more long term saving.”

Andrew Thompson, Grants Manager at the Friends Provident Foundation added
“The Foundation believes that building some savings can be a way of helping combat poverty and developing future personal autonomy - particularly for low-income groups - but is aware that UK society as a whole has moved away from savings as a source of wealth.
Our Trustees were therefore pleased to be able to support ILC-UK to conduct an exploration of what rights and responsibilities should exist in our ‘financialised’ society and the potential roles of the individual, the state and the private sector in moving us in a new direction on saving. We welcome the publication of their report, which raises some very important real-life issues, suggests some interesting solutions, and sets out what the implications for public policy would be. We very much look forward to following the debate that we hope will ensue.”

In the report, ILC-UK set out a series of principles of financial citizenship:

  • Duties must be matched by entitlements, which are not contingent upon private sector provision.
  • The financial system must be ‘democratised’.
  • Policies designed to support citizens to engage with the financial system should involve both universal and progressive (or means-tested) support.
  • Universal support should be designed in accordance with the life-stage implications for recipients.
  • Policies based on insights from behavioural economics are consistent with financial citizenship.
  • Financial citizens have a right to financial education.

ILC-UK urge the Government to consider supporting the creation of The Lifetime Bonus Savings Account (LBSA) developed by Tony Dolphin. Dolphin argues that the LBSA, in offering matching contributions for consistent saving targeted on low-to-middle income earners, represents a use of public money far more consistent with financial citizenship than existing spending to encourage saving.

Ends

About ILC-UK: The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. We develop ideas, undertake research and create a forum for debate.

Notes:

  • 'Financial Citizenship: Rethinking the state’s role in enabling individuals to save’ has been supported by the Friends Provident Foundation
  • The think piece will be launched at an event chaired by Baroness Greengross on the afternoon of 24th April. Speakers at the event include:- Danielle Walker Palmour, Friends Provident Foundation and David Budworth of The Times
  • Advance copies of the report are available from David Sinclair at ILC-UK.

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