EVENTS:

Wednesday, 29th November 2017, Amnesty International Human Rights Action Centre, 25 New Inn Yard
London, EC2A 3EA


Time for Transformation, a new ‘normal’ – where society has aligned and adapted to the fact we are living longer.

The world is going through turbulent times. But one thing is certain – it is getting older.

ILC-UK has been active for 16 years and have witnessed some significant change over this time. Yet progress has been far too slow and we are still talking about issues which should have been solved 10 years ago.

This conference will aim to reinvigorate those of us already convinced of the importance of ageing. But to achieve the transformation we need must reach beyond the usual suspects. We need businesses, entrepreneurs, people managers, and marketing professionals to work with the charity sector and policy makers and politicians to deliver change. And we need to help provide the evidence to make the case for action.

Our third conference will seek to kick-start that transformation. It won’t be a run of the mill “ageing” conference. It will be different. We will challenge and energise you. We want the conference to lead to change.
If we are to make the most of the opportunity of age we need to engage businesses and community leaders to act.

We want everyone to come away learning something new and with a plan to act. We will set the groundwork to inspire and support government, business and voluntary organisations to better prepare, adapt and prosper in a longer-lived society. The conference will reach new businesses and other stakeholders.

You will disagree with some of what our presenters have to say. That’s fine, the Future of Ageing Conference is a place to have these honest debates. And you will get the opportunity to have your say.

The Future of Ageing Conference will

  • be brave enough to have the honest conversations we need to have
  • convene experts and innovators
  • challenge our own prejudices and yours
  • debate some of the big issues
  • avoid stereotyping. We won’t let people generalise about older or younger people or even about cohorts. Saying “The baby boomers X” will be banned
  • debating the evidence rather than present it
  • avoid “the ageing Cliché”
  • try and cause mischief and have some fun
  • invite unexpected contributors to talk about the big and familiar issues
  • challenge every speaker
  • Insist speakers focus on the transforming tomorrow today

But we won’t...

  • repeat what people already know. Before the conference delegates will get a short factpack setting out the evidence
  • allow presenters to show us showing population pyramids (we all know we are ageing)
  • pretend that ageing is always good and that old age is always the best time of our lives. Too many older people spend too much of their time alone, in poor health, with only the TV for company
  • let people say “The fact we are living longer is a good thing”. It doesn’t need to be said. And it undermines the fact that for too many people today, old age isn’t a good or happy time
  • try to sex up ageing or pretend there are simple solutions
  • let anyone use imagery of older people’s hands in their presentation. And we won’t have any smiling studio shots of older people on the beach

Eventbrite - The Future of Ageing Conference 2017:  Transforming Tomorrow Today

Wednesday, 5th April 2017; 09:30 (for 10:00) – 15:30, Church House, Dean’s Yard, Great Smith Street, London SW1P 3NZ

Socio-economic inequalities continue to present challenges to the Government’s Fuller Working Lives programme, and research conducted by the ILC-UK in 2015 found that although 1.1 million people are currently working beyond state pension age, 1 million people aged 50-64 have been forced out of work through a combination of redundancy, ill health or early retirement.

This one day conference, hosted by the ILC-UK and research teams from renEWL and the Uncertain Futures consortium allowed policy makers, business leaders, civil society organisations and academics to engage with new research findings on the socio-economic inequalities preventing some sections of the population from achieving longer, fuller working lives. The conference examined the current barriers to extending working lives: health inequalities, work place practice, and the policy barriers that Government, business and civil society can work collectively to address.

Speakers included:

  • John Cridland, Independent Reviewer of the State Pension Age
  • Professor David Armstrong, Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King's College London
  • Professor Jenny Head, Professor of Medical and Social Statistics, UCL
  • Prof. Sarah Vickerstaff, Professor of Work and Employment, University of Kent
  • Dr Mai Stafford, Reader in Social Epidemiology, MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing
  • Dr Charlotte ClarkReader in Environmental & Mental Health Epidemiology, Queen Mary, University of London
  • Peter KellySenior Psychologist, Health and Safety Executive
  • Nicola Lee, Employment Relations Adviser, RCN
  • Dr Ewan CarrResearch Associate, UCL Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
  • Professor Wendy LorettoDean, University of Edinburgh’s Business School, and Professor of Organisational Behaviour
  • Patrick Thomson, Senior Programme Manager, Centre for Ageing Better
  • Denise Keating, CEO, Employers Network for Equality and Inclusion
  • Yvonne Sonsino, Innovation Leader, Mercer Europe and Pacific
  • Dr Emily MurraySenior Research Associate, UCL Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
  • Professor Chris PhillipsonProfessor of Gerontology and Co-Director of the Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing
  • Russell Taylor, DWP Fuller Working Lives Team
  • Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director, Age UK
  • Professor Stephen StansfeldProfessor of Psychiatry, Queen Mary, University of London
  • Dr Joanne CrawfordHead of the Ergonomics and Human Factors section at the Institute of Occupational Medicine
  • Rachael Saunders, Business in the Community

Please see below for the slides presented during the Conference.

Economics of Age,Equality and Human Rights,Future of Age,Intergenerational

Wednesday, 22nd March 2017; 17:00 (for 17:30) - 19:30, Committee Room G, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, SW1A 0PW. Chair by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE

Confirmed speakers include: Andrew Harrop, General Secretary, Fabian SocietyDr Stuart Fox, Wiserd, Cardiff University; Professor Phil Cowley, Professor of Politics, Queen Mary University of London;               Dr Jeannie Bristow, Senior Sociology and Social Policy Lecturer, Canterbury Christ Church University;     Dr James Sloam, Reader in Politics and International Relations, Royal Holloway, University of London;     Dr Andrew Mycock, Reader in Politics, University of HuddersfieldAbby Tomlinson, Host of Westminster Abby and Co-Founder of the Milifandom and David Eaton, Policy and Public Affairs OfficerILC-UK.

Recent elections and referenda in the UK have implied a growing intergenerational divide. Older people have voted in larger proportions than younger cohorts leading to vocal concerns from journalists, politicians, and academics that older people are having an increasingly dominant impact on UK politics.

The public debate is getting angrier. The argument goes that older people are benefitting while younger people are finding themselves increasingly politically and socially excluded. Following the EU referendum, The Independent ran a story “How old people have screwed over the younger generation”. Huffington Post ran another under the headline “Young ‘Screwed By Older Generations”.

But how real is this intergenerational divide? During this debate we will explore whether, and how policy can best respond. We will explore:

  • Why are younger people poorly engaged in elections?
  • What does an ageing society mean for the future of participation by younger people?
  • What are the policy solutions: How can we get young people more engaged in elections?

If you are interested in attending this event, please write to events@ilcuk.org.uk

Roundtable discussion: The value of advice
Tuesday, 21st March, 14:30 - 16:30
Central London


This private roundtable event will assemble policy experts to discuss the impact of independent financial advice.

Chaired by David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK and supported by Royal London, this discuss will inform a major new report from the ILC-UK, to be launched later this year. The report will map the characteristics of people who receive financial advice, and detail the medium-term economic impact of expert financial advice on consumer outcomes.

This event is an invitation only event.

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Health,Longevity

Wednesday, 22nd February 2017; 10:00 (for 10:30) – 12:30, Cass Business School, 106 Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8TZ

On Wednesday, 22nd February, the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) and Cass Business School hosted the launch of a new report entitled 'Does living in a retirement village extend life expectancy? The case of Whiteley Village'.

The UK population over age 65 is projected to increase by more than 40% during the next 17 years to over 16 million; while the number of people in the UK over age 85 is expected to double during the next 23 years to more than 3.4 million. With the population ageing so rapidly, finding ways in which the older population can live their later lives in relative health and comfort has become an increasingly important issue in the UK.

One relatively recent development is the creation of retirement villages in the UK, to house and care for the increasing numbers of older people who are attracted to this type of communal retirement living. Until now, studies of retirement villages have sought to examine funding options or quality of life outcomes for residents. However, this new report is the first of its kind to consider whether retirement village life can extend life expectancy.

Using Whiteley Retirement Village as a case study, and utilising a century’s worth of data derived from resident records, this report examines differences in life expectancy between Whiteley Village residents compared to the general population; it also accounts for gender and socio-economic disparities in life expectancy.

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Tuesday 24th January 2017; 16:00 (for 16:30 start) - 18:30 (followed by a short drinks reception); Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ

As the population of the UK continues to age, the demand for social care increases, as do the associated costs. How to pay for long term care is therefore a hot topic in the insurance world and amongst policy makers.

This event saw the launch of a new paper from the ILC-UK and Cass Business School which investigates different ways in which individuals can purchase and pay for insurance products specifically to help them to pay for their care costs in later life.

Chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK, the launch included a keynote presentation from report co-author Professor Les Mayhew, with responses offered by Jules Constantinou, Regional Manage, Gen Re Life/Health; Brian Fisher, Aviva/Friends Life, and Steve Lowe, Just.

Please click here to download an audio recording of the event's presentations and discussion.


The presentation slides delivered at the event can be downloaded below.

            

Economics of Age,Pensions,Work and Retirement

Wednesday, 18th January 2017; 09:00 (for 09:30) - 11:00, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, London SW1A 0PW

Held on Wednesday, 18th January 2017 in the House of Lords, this event launched the ILC-UK report 'The end of the beginning? Private defined benefit pensions and the new normal'.

The collapse of BHS and concerns over the future of Tata Steel have put the sustainability of private sector defined benefit (DB) pension schemesfirmly into the spotlight. These types of DB schemes promise a set payment to their members in retirement based on salary and years of service, but there are growing concerns that many such schemes and their sponsors will be unable to fulfil their promises at a time of rising life expectancy and falling interest rates.

Rather than a technical paper, the report is intended to be a discussion piece in order to stimulate further debate on this highly important issue. To mark the launch, a panel discussion was held, including Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society, ILC-UK; Douglas Anderson, Partner, Hymans Robertson; Prof. David Blake, Director, Pensions Institute, Cass Business School, and Jennifer Donohue, Partner, Ince and Co LLP.

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:
 

Wednesday 14th December 2016, 16:00 (for 16:30 start) - 18:30 (followed by a short drinks reception), Staple Inn Hall, Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ

Dear Colleague,

On Wednesday 14th December 2016, we launched a paper which reviews the present and proposed formula for means-testing adult social care in England.

In 2011, the Dilnot Commission recommended a cap of £35,000 on adult social care costs, and that the threshold for means-tested assistance be raised from £23,250 to £100,000 for those in residential care. This new paper by Cass Business School reviews the present formula for means-testing adult social care and the formula recommended by the Dilnot Commission, and finds fault with both.

Chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK, the launch included a keynote presentation from report author, Professor Les Mayhew, Professor of Statistics, Faculty of Actuarial Science and Insurance, Cass Business School, and a response from an expert panel of actuaries and related professionals.

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

 

 

                         

 

 

Care,Communities and Housing,Health,Quality of Life

Monday, 5th December 2016; 09:00 (for 09:30) – 11:30; London

In my role as Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), I will be hosting a roundtable discussion on how the Enhanced Care Worker role can be encouraged and managed.

In June 2016, ILC-UK, kindly supported by The Department of Health, conducted research and launched a report which for the first time explored the emerging role of what was termed an Enhanced Care Worker in the adult social care sector. Whilst the title of the role differs between providers, sometimes called a Care Practitioner or Senior Care Lead, it is defined as upskilling care workers to provide enhanced clinical support to the registered nurse.

The launch event and panel discussion held in the House of Lords in July 2016 stimulated an engaging and passionate discussion, and found that there was a real desire for leaders across the care homer sector to work together to develop and move towards a standardisation of the role which would benefit both staff within the sector as well as residents themselves. Many audience members expressed the desire for this conversation to continue beyond the afternoon event.

How can this role contribute towards making nursing in the care home sector more attractive? Would a national accreditation scheme be viable and desirable? And does this role align with the newly proposed Nurse Associate role?

This is an invitation only event, if you are interested in more information, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Pensions,Work and Retirement

Monday 28th November 2016; 12:30 (for 13:00) - 14:30; London

On Monday 28th November 2016, ILC-UK held a private, invitation only roundtable lunch discussion on the pensions and savings challenges facing consumers in the UK, and around the world. The roundtable was attended by Pensions Minister Richard Harrington MP, and was limited to fifteen high‐level participants; the meeting operated under the Chatham House Rule.

The saving for retirement challenge is both local and global. Rising life expectancy is going to put pressure on pensions systems around the world, making it harder for governments to fund PAYG systems and more important that individuals make private savings in order to fund retirement.

A major new project, ‘The Global and Local Savings Challenge: Perceptions Vs Reality’ will feature new survey data from the UK, US and Asia to present a picture of perceived readiness and expectations for retirements internationally. The data, presented and discussed by ILC-UK at the roundtable, includes analysis of global trends in savings rates, the impact on the economy, and the inequalities between the generations.

The final report, to be launched in the New Year after including input from the roundtable, will also conduct original analysis to determine the ability of pensions systems around the world to support incomes in retirement; this will show whether more optimistic countries and regions are justified in their optimism, or whether there is a significant disconnect between expectations. The report, for which we thank Prudential plc for their support, will also examine retirement readiness by UK region.

During this roundtable discussion with pensions and savings experts, participants discussed how best public policy, and the financial services industry can work together to solve the savings challenges facing consumers today, and what the UK can learn from international pensions systems and savings practices.

Health,Quality of Life

Wednesday, 16th November 2016; 17:30 (for 18:00, with canapés and refreshments) – 19:15; Old Operating Theatre Museum, 9a St Thomas Street, London, SE1 9RY

The Jack Watters debate - tackling antimicrobial resistance in an ageing society, took place on the 16th November 2016 at the Old Operating Theatre Museum in London.

This event was dedicated to a long term supporter of the ILC and a pioneer in championing the health and well-being of ageing people, Dr. Jack Watters.

The debate was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) and saw the participation of the following speakers: 

  • Professor David Salisbury CB, Associate Fellow, Centre on Global Health Security Chatham House
  • Matthew Edwards, Head of Mortality and Longevity, Towers Watson
  • Michelle Bresnahan, Founder, A Life for a Cure
  • Dr Gina Radford, Deputy Chief Medical Officer

Jack Watters served as Pfizer US Vice President for External Medical Affairs. In a pharmaceutical career spanning more than thirty years, Jack pioneered the landmark Diflucan Partnership Programme; spearheaded the ‘Get Old’ campaign to promote positive attitudes and approaches to ageing, and worked tirelessly in the fields of human rights, HIV/AIDS and ageing.

To celebrate Jack’s life and contribution to public health advancements around the world, the ILC-UK organised this special debate on one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century: the threat posed to medicine by the rise of antimicrobial resistance. Fittingly held in the oldest operating theatre in Europe, the debate focused on what must be done to prevent (in the words of Lord O’Neill, Chair of the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance) medicine being plunged ‘back into the dark ages’.

Senior policymakers and patient group representatives discussed the UK, and global challenge posed by antimicrobial resistance; the specific risk posed to healthy longevity; the role of vaccination in reducing antibiotic usage; and what Government and civil society can do to meet these challenges.

Please see below for the presentation slides from the event:

 
Matthew Edwards' presentation slides:

16Nov16 - The Dr Jack Watters Debate - Matthew Edwards Slides by ILC-UK on Scribd

Future of Age

Wednesday, 29th November 2017; Central London

Our third annual Future of Ageing Conference will be held in Central London on Wednesday, 29th November 2017.

Registration information and further details will be available here shortly, so do please check back regularly. We will also update this page with the latest news on keynote speakers for the third annual Future of Ageing Conference,

For information about previous ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conferences, please see below.


Wednesday, 9th November 2016, 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 16:50; Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, London, SW1H 9NH

On Wednesday 9th November 2016, we held our second annual International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) Future of Ageing conference  in Westminster, London.

We are grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of the conference.

  • A full agenda from the day is available to view at the bottom of this page.
  • The presentation slides from the day are available to view at the bottom of this page.

We welcomed over 180 delegates at our second annual Future of Ageing conference, made up of business leaders; charity sector experts; public sector decision makers; local authority staff; academics; and senior journalists.

Our first conference, described by one delegate as ‘one of the best conferences I have ever attended’, was held in November 2015. The conference assembled experts from the fields of health, housing, finance and business to identify the challenges and opportunities posed by an ageing society. The Future of Ageing 2015 sold out weeks ahead of the event.

Speakers for the 2016 Future of Ageing conference included:

  • Dr Islene Araujo de Carvalho, Senior Policy and Strategy Adviser, Department of Ageing and Life Course, WHO
  • John Cridland CBEHead of the Independent State Pension Age Review
  • The Rt Rev. and the Rt Hon. the Lord Carey of Clifton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1991-2002
  • Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society, ILC-UK
  • Professor Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
  • Dwayne Johnson, Director of Social Care and Health at Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council
  • Dr Margaret McCartney, Author and Broadcaster
  • John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, UK Statistics Authority
  • David Sinclair, Director, ILC-UK
  • Jonathan Stevens, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP
  • Linda Woodall, Director of Life Insurance and Financial Advice, and sponsor of the Ageing Population project, Financial Conduct Authority


Who attended?

  • Health and social care professionals
  • Pension and investment fund managers
  • Actuaries
  • Local authority officers: Service Commissioners, Housing Officers and Public Health teams
  • Charity sector representatives
  • Business leaders
  • Civil servants working across health, social care, housing and planning, pensions, personal finance and transport
  • Gerontologists, sociologists and other academics with an interest in the implications of our rapidly ageing society
  • Senior journalists: Finance, social affairs, consumer affairs and political correspondents

 

REGISTRATION FEES

Corporate Rate
£235+VAT (Early Bird Rate)
£299+VAT (Full Rate)              

Charity/ Not for Profit/ Uni /Individuals Rate
£155+VAT (Early Bird Rate)
£210+VAT (Full Rate)

Our early bird rates increased to the full rate from the end of August.

Members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme received a discount on ticket costs.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

We had a number of promotional opportunities available for organisations wishing to be involved in the 2016 Future of Ageing conference:

  • Full Package – included exclusive sponsorship of the write-up from the conference, a full page advertisement space in the conference programme, company logo on the cover of the conference programme, exhibition space at the conference, free delegate spaces, and more.
  • Advertisement Package – included a half page advertisement space in the conference programme, exhibition space at the conference and company logo at the front of the conference programme and more.
  • Bursary places for older and younger lay people – sponsorship covered the travel and attendance of 20 older and younger lay people at the conference, exhibition space, shout outs on the ILC-UK social media platforms and more
  • Exhibition package – included exhibition space at the conference, promotional materials in delegate packs, two free delegate spaces and more.

We were also happy to work with organisations on bespoke packages. More information is available here,

We were grateful to McCarthy & Stone for their sponsorship of this conference.

Further support was kindly received from:

           


 

 

 

2016 ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference Agenda by ILC-UK on Scribd

ILC-UK Future of Ageing Presentation Slides - 09Nov16

 
Slides from Linda Woodall's presentation:
Communities and Housing

Wednesday 12th October 2016; 10:00 (for a 10:30 start) - 12:30; Legal & General, One Coleman Street, London, EC2R 5AA

On the 12th October 2016, the ILC-UK held a Housing in an Ageing Society event, kindly hosted by Legal & General and supported by the ILC-UK Partners Programme.

On Tuesday, 19th July the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) launched our “Housing in an ageing society” factpack with the support of FirstPort.

The report found a significant increase in older people living alone, yet millions were failing to adapt their homes to help them live independently.

  • The State of the Nation’s Housing’ reports that:Only around half of those over 50s experiencing limitations in Activities of Daily Living, live in homes with any adaptations.
  • Those in retirement housing are significantly more likely to be living in homes with adaptations than those who do not. Approximately 87% of those in retirement housing have home adaptations, by comparison to around 60% of other housing.
  • There could be a retirement housing gap of 160,000 by 2030 if current trends continue. By 2050, the gap could grow to 376,000.
  • Over 16 million people – mainly owner occupied, middle aged and older households - live in under-occupied housing.
  • Growing numbers of 45-64 year olds, and 65-74 year olds are living alone, with 6 million people living in houses with two or more excess bedrooms.

At the event we explored these trends and consider how policymakers should respond.

Speakers:

  • Sally Randall, Director, Housing Standards and Support, Department for Communities and Local Government
  • Nigel Wilson, Group Chief Executive, Legal & General;
  • Dr Brian Beach, Research Fellow, ILC-UK

The presentation slides from the event are available to view here:

Monday 18th July 2016; 18:00 (for an 18:30 start) - 20:30; The Griffin Room, Counting House, 50 Cornhill, London, EC3V 3PD

On Monday, 18th July 2016 we were delighted to launch of our 2016 factpack. In 2016, our factpack focuses on the challenges and opportunities of housing in an ageing society.

Instead of simply presenting the latest information about ageing in UK society, this year we used our factpack launch to test our guests' knowledge on a range of issues related to older people and experiences in later life.

Our 2016 factpack was launched at a pub quiz. This unique launch broke away from the run-of-the-mill seminar and allowed participants to network whilst testing their knowledge of the issues of an ageing society.
 

Over the past three years, ILC-UK has produced 4 major factpacks. These factpacks aim to highlight the latest evidence of our changing demography.

Our 2016 factpack, 'The state of the nation's housing: An ILC-UK Factpack' is now available to download.

The factpack, and pub quiz launch, was supported by FirstPort.

Thursday 14th July 2016; London

ILC-UK will be holding an intimate summer party to thank our Trustees and key funders for their continued support of ILC-UK.

This is an invitation only event.

Care

Monday, 4th July; 13:30 (for 14:00) – 16:00; Committee Room G, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, London, SW1A 0PW

‘Innovate to Alleviate: Exploring How the Role of an Enhanced Care Worker Could Address Skills Shortages in the Social Care Sector’ constitutes the first qualitative investigation of an emerging role within the adult social care sector: the ‘Enhanced Care Worker’ (ECW), where care workers are trained to undertake clinical tasks traditionally done by nurses.

The first scoping review of its kind to examine the development of the ECW role, this qualitative investigation will be published on Wednesday, 22nd June. It was compiled from a number of interviews with individuals from all levels of the care home sector, including managers, Registered Nurses, ECWs, and high-level representatives from organisations that oversee a number of care homes.

In order to explore the challenges and opportunities this new role presents, this event invited parliamentarians, industry leaders, academics and care worker representatives to a panel discussion in the House of Lords.

To read more and to download the report, please click here.

Please see below for the presentation delivered at Innovate to Alleviate.

Future of Age,Global Ageing

Thursday, 30th June 2016; 14:15 (for a 14:30 start) – 16:30; House of Lords

We are delighted to be holding the launch of a provocative new exploration of public service provision, the welfare state and democratic governance in the 21st century.

‘The future of the UK welfare state’, our new landmark publication, supported by Munich Re, will be launched on Thursday 30th June 2016. To mark the launch we are inviting parliamentarians, policy makers, academics and members of the press to the House of Lords to hear some of our contributors provide a brief outline of their essays.

As a futures organisation focussed on some of the biggest challenges facing Government and society in the context of demographic change, the ILC-UK is proud to launch this examination of such key policy challenges as the housing market in an ageing population, education in the 21st century, creating a sustainable welfare system and adapting to fundamental shifts in the labour market.

Speakers for this event include:

  • Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of Ageing, ILC-UK
  • Prof. Elsa Fornero, Chair of Economics, University of Turin
  • George Magnus, Senior Independent economic adviser to UBS, and Associate of the China Centre of Oxford University
  • Lord Best, Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group for Housing and Care for Older People
  • Dr Andy Tarrant, Head of Policy at BandCE, Provider of the Peoples Pension
  • Rt Hon. Steve Webb, Director of Policy and External Communications, Royal London
  • Norma Cohen, PhD Candidate and former Demography Correspondent, The Financial Times
  • John Philpott, Director, The Jobs Economist
  • Nusrat Ghani MP, Chair, All Party  Parliamentary Group for Ageing and Older People

This event is now at capacity. If you would like to add your details to the waiting list via the button below:

Eventbrite - The future of the UK welfare state

Kind Regards

David Sinclair
Director, International Longevity Centre - UK

Tuesday 28th June 2016; 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) - 10:30; London

On the 28th June, ILC-UK will be holding a breakfast planning meeting with members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme. The ILC-UK team will talk about our activities over the past year along with plans for next year. The meeting will provide Partners with the opportunity to influence ILC-UK's plans for the year.

This is a private event for members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme only.

For more information about the Partners Programme, please click here.

Future of Age,Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Friday 10th June 2016; 09:15 - 16:30 (followed by a short drinks reception); The Chartered Insurance Institute, 20 Aldermanbury, London EC2V 7HY

On Friday, 10th June 2016, ILC-UK hosted our second Retirement Income Summit, hosted by The Chartered Insurance Institute.

In 2012, ILC-UK organised our first Retirement Income Summit which provided a platform for discussion between 180 policymakers, senior insurance industry experts, business representatives, charities and academics.


Over the past 20 years, huge progress has been made in tackling pensioner poverty. Relative pensioner incomes have increased due to a combination of later retirement, the pensions “triple lock” and increased earning power of the baby boomers.

However, the future for retirement income looks less rosy. Policy change, ongoing demographic change and low investment returns are contributing to significant uncertainty. The new single tier pension will be less generous for the majority in the long term. Fewer people will find themselves receiving the more generous final salary pensions. And incomes of the next generation of retirees look likely to be lower. Three in ten of Britain’s 55-64 year olds do not have any pension savings at all.

With the end of compulsory annuitisation, retirees over the next 20 years will face many more options. Making the wrong decision could result in people living longer than their money or in greater levels of under consumption. Greater risk is being placed in the hands of retirees and there is a question as to what role there might be for collective decumulation in the future.

Navigating the retirement income maze will require greater information, advice and financial capability. Finding new ways of delivering advice to the mass market is vital. Recent and future developments in robo-advice offer some opportunity and regulators will need to find ways to ensure that they do not inadvertently create barriers to greater access to advice. In addition to at retirement financial advice, there is likely to be a growing need for mid retirement financial advice. But how can this be best delivered.

During the Retirement Income Summit, keynote speakers discussed:

  • How can individuals and industry respond best to policy change (pension freedoms, cashing in annuities and possible tax relief changes)?
  • How can future retirement income be guaranteed in a context of continuing demographic change?
  • How can providers and individuals deliver a decent income during a period of low investment returns?
  • How can we overcome consumer distrust and lack of engagement with the industry?
  • How can we deliver advice and financial capability in the future?
  • What will be the future role of housing wealth for retirement income and what is the role of extend working lives?
  • What is the potential for new products to help reduce risk for future generations of retirees?


Agenda

09:15 – 09:50 - Registration, refreshments will be served
09:50 – 09:55 - Welcome from CII - Laurence Baxter, Head of Policy & Research, The Chartered Insurance Institute
09:55 – 10:00 - Welcome by Chair - Lawrence Churchill, ILC-UK Trustee

Getting young people saving - Discussion
10:00 – 11:00 - Sam Smethers, The Fawcett Society, will chair this session. Panellists include Michelle McGagh; Kate Jopling; Helen Creighton; Claire Walsh

Innovation at retirement. Lessons from the US, opportunities and challenges
11:00 – 11:20 - Chip Castille, Managing Director, Chief Retirement Strategist, BlackRock

11:20 – 11:40 - Break, refreshments will be served

Where next for advice and guidance?
11:40 – 11:50 - Cesira Urzi Brancati, Research Fellow, ILC-UK
11:50 – 12:00 - Michelle Cracknell, Chief Executive, The Pensions Advisory Service (TPAS)
12:00 – 12:50 - Discussion - Panellists include Michelle Cracknell, Chief Executive, The Pensions Advisory Service (TPAS); Cesira Urzi Brancati, Research Fellow, ILC-UK; Jackie Spencer, Pension and Retirement Expert for the UK's Money Advice Service; Claire Walsh, Chartered Financial Planner, Aspect8, Brighton

12:50 – 13:30 - Lunch, refreshments will be served

13:30 - Welcome by Chair - Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK

Retirement today, retirement tomorrow
13:30 – 13:55 - Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society, ILC-UK
13:55 – 14:20 - Baroness Jeannie Drake, Member of the Finance Bill Sub-Committee

14:20 – 14:35 - Break, refreshments will be serve

14:35 – 15:00 - Professor David Blake, Professor of Pension Economics, Cass Business School

Pension Freedoms: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
15:00 – 15:15 - Steve Webb, Director of Policy and External Communications, Royal London
15:15 – 15:30 - Gregg McClymont, Head of Retirement Savings, Aberdeen Asset Management PLC

Where next for Retirement Income? Discussion and closing debate
15:30 – 16:25 - Douglas Anderson, Partner, Hymans Robertson; Andrew Tully, Pensions Technical Director, Retirement Advantage; Gregg McClymont, Head of Retirement Savings, Aberdeen Asset Management PLC; Steve Webb, Director of Policy and External Communications, Royal London

16:25 – 16:30 - Close by chair - Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK

16:30 - 17:15 - Wine reception
 

Please see below for the presentations delivered at the Second National Retirement Income Summit 
 

Health,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), invites you to be an audience member at a high level Inquiry into the relationship between alcohol and employment in the over 50s population in the UK. The Inquiry will be led by the ILC-UK and supported by the Drink Wise Age Well partnership which brings together alcohol and ageing charities and academic institutions from across the UK.

The Inquiry will be held over three dates with each session focussing on a different theme:


Alcohol and over 50s out of work and seeking employment
Monday 18th April; 10:30 – 12:30
Committee Room 3, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, SW1A 0PW

Eventbrite - Alcohol and over 50s out of work and seeking employment


Alcohol and over 50s currently in employment
Friday 6th May; 10:30 – 12:30
Committee Room 3, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, SW1A 0PW

Eventbrite - Alcohol and over 50s currently in employment


Alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement
Monday 23rd May; 14:30 – 16:30
Committee Room 3, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, SW1A 0PW

Eventbrite - Alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement


You are welcome to attend any one of these Inquiry sessions. To register, click on the buttons above.

Please note that due to House of Lords security regulations, you are required to register for each session you are interested in attending. You will not be permitted entry into the House of Lords if you have not registered.

Drink Wise, Age Well is a Big Lottery Funded programme, set up to address the often hidden problems surrounding alcohol-related harm in the over 50s. As well as providing targeted community interventions, the programme will also be building a robust evidence base to assess what the biggest challenges are surrounding older adults and alcohol-related harm in the UK today. Our research has found that there is an often complex relationship between employment, unemployment, retirement and alcohol amongst the over 50s in the UK which needs to be fully understood.

In light of this, we are holding an Inquiry to reach out and engage with a wide cross section of stakeholders and generate wider political and public awareness, understanding and traction on this issue. Each Inquiry session will hear from expert witnesses, and the evidence emerging will contribute to our next annual State of the Nation report on alcohol-related harm amongst the over 50s.

During each two hour session, each expert will be invited to give an overview of their experiences and views on the topic, and audience members will have an opportunity to speak or ask questions after all of our expert witnesses have delivered their evidence to the Inquiry.

We look forward to welcoming you to any or all of the Inquiry sessions into alcohol, employment and the over 50s. If you have any queries about the Inquiry please do not hesitate to contact ILC-UK on events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Equality and Human Rights,Longevity,Pensions

Tuesday 3rd May; 16.30pm (for a 17:00 start) - 18.30, followed by drinks reception; Prudential, M&G, 5 Laurence Poutney Hill, EC4R 0HH

ILC-UK and Cass Business School private debate and reception, supported by ILC-UK Partners Programme and hosted by Prudential.

At this event, Professor Les Mayhew launched new research highlighting a growth in inequalities in life expectancy over recent decades. ILC-UK facilitated a debate on how future increases in State Pension Age can be fair, given these growing inequalities with contributions from John Cridland, the Government's Independent Reviewer of State Pension Age.

ILC-UK’s 2014 research (Linking State Pension Age to Longevity), supported by Age UK, found that measures such as healthy life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy vary significantly by region and social class.

This new research by Professor Les Mayhew reveals that the life expectancy gap between the richest and poorest has begun to increase. The research reveals that the richest 5% of men are living an average of 96.2 years, which is 34.2 years longer than the poorest 10% of men. The gap is 1.7 years wider than in 1993.

There are likely to be significant unintended consequences of further increases to State Pension Age in 2028. Increasing State Pension Age up to levels where disability rates are higher, raises concerns about transferring spending from the State Pension to disability or other working age benefits. Increasing the State Pension Age further might also impact on the supply of carers. And will employers be prepared for further increases in the State Pension Age?

Public policy is beginning to recognise the challenges ahead. The DWP Select Committee are currently conducting an Inquiry into “early drawing of the state pension”. Labour have proposed a flexible state pension age so manual workers can retire earlier than other workers. Are there other, potentially more radical solutions to the inequalities challenge?

Please see below for the slides delivered by Professor Les Mayhew at the event.

To download the slides, please click the Pdf link below.

Chrome users using the default PDF reader may have difficulty downloading PDF files. Please use an alternative browser or install a PDF reader plugin. If you are still experiencing issues, contact info@ilcuk.org.uk.

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Care

Tuesday 26th April

Professor Les Mayhew of Cass Business School has drafted a new paper on the topic of means testing of adult social care.

The paper investigates the current and proposed funding formula for state support and makes a proposal for an alternative approach, which the paper argues is fairer and more transparent.

ILC-UK will be launching the paper with Professor Mayhew later in the year, but ahead of the launch, we will be holding a roundtable discussion to allow contributors to provide expert input on the draft paper as well as comment on the recommendations.

This event is a private roundtable discussion.

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Global Ageing,Health,International

Thursday 21st April 2016, 12:30 – 14:30, Belgium

ILC-UK held a private lunch debate, supported by Prudential plc, for senior decision makers and policy experts to discuss how Europe can best respond to the economic and social challenges and opportunities emerging as a result of demographic change.

To introduce the debate, Richard Jackson, President of the Global Aging Institute and one of the world’s foremost authorities on ageing, explored the emerging demographic, economic, and social trends shaping the future of retirement. He discussed his most recent research findings on East Asia and the similarities and differences between the outlook there and in Europe.

ILC-UK then presented its own economic analysis of the impact of global demographic change on Europe and highlighted some of the policy implications for Member States.

During the lunch attendees debated:

  • Might Europe’s Growth Strategy be undermined by demographic change?
  • What can Europe learn from how other parts of the world are maximising the economic potential of an ageing society?
  • Is Europe’s Silver Economy well placed to benefit from the world-wide ageing trend?
  • How can initiatives (e.g. Covenant on Demographic Change) focused on helping cities and regions work best?
  • How can the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing help deliver a healthier older age?
  • What more can European policymakers do to help extend working lives and support active and productive ageing?
  • How can businesses help Europe to maximise the economic potential of an ageing society?

Please see below for a summary of the points raised at this roundtable discussion

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Global Ageing,International

Wednesday 20th April 2016,12:30 (for 13:00 start) – 14:30, London

ILC-UK held a private lunch debate, supported by Prudential plc, for senior decision makers and policy experts to discuss how the UK can best respond to the economic and social challenges and opportunities emerging as a result of demographic change.

To introduce the debate, Richard Jackson, President of the Global Aging Institute and one of the world’s foremost authorities on ageing, explored the emerging demographic, economic, and social trends shaping the future of retirement. He discussed his most recent research findings on East Asia and the similarities and differences between the outlook there and in Europe.

ILC-UK then presented its own economic analysis of the impact of global demographic change on the UK and highlighted some of the policy implications.

During the lunch attendees debated:

  • Might the UK’s plans for growth be undermined by demographic change?
  • What can the UK learn from how other parts of the world are maximising the economic potential of an ageing society?
  • Is the UK well placed to benefit from global ageing?
  • Is public policy in the UK adequately responding to demographic change?
  • What should the UK include within its forthcoming “fuller working lives” strategy?
  • How can business help the UK to maximise the economic potential of an ageing society?

Please see below for a summary of the points raised at this roundtable discussion

Monday 18th April 2016, 14:30 - 16:30, House of Lords

In December 2015, the International Longevity Centre – UK published Understanding Retirement Journeys: Expectations vs Reality, a major containing new insights into what retirement is really like. The report, funded by Prudential, busted the myth of older people splashing their retirement cash on leisure and holidays. Instead, the report found that consumptions falls during retirement, with a household headed by someone aged 80 and over spending, on average, 43% less than a household headed by a 50 year old.

The report also looked into how daily activities change with age. While retirement does not lead to more holidays, time at home alone significantly increases while time spent with family and friends falls. By age 90+, watching television and spending time at home alone are the most common daily activities.

The report’s findings have significant implications for pensions policy – especially in light of the new pension freedoms which enable people to use their pension pots more flexibly in retirement as their needs change. And the fact that people are saving into retirement is also highly relevant from a macroeconomic standpoint.   

During this private roundtable discussion, attendees are invited to discover how people really spend their retirements. We will also be discussing how best public policy and the financial services industry can work together to deliver products and services that meet changing needs in retirement.

This is a private roundtable discussion between parliamentarians and representatives of the pensions industry.

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Future of Age,Health,Intergenerational,Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Thursday 17th March 2016; 14:30 - 16:30; House of Lords, Westminster, London

We held an event to debate the impact of the 2016 Budget on the Future of Retirement Incomes. The debate, chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross and supported by the International Longevity Centre –UK’s (ILC-UK) Partners Programme, took place ahead of our Second Retirement Income Summit on 10th June and will feed into ILC-UK’s plans for the event.

Following the Government’s Comprehensive Spending Review in November 2015, Chancellor George Osbourne will deliver the second Budget of this Parliament’s Conservative majority Government on Wednesday 16th March 2016.

During the ILC-UK organised debate, we presented our initial analysis of the Budget, looking beyond the immediate ‘winners and losers’ commentary to consider whether the long-term challenges of low productivity, systemic under saving by private individuals and the critical underfunding of adult social care are being addressed. Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society at ILC-UK presented the analysis, and was on hand to answer any questions delegates had. We also heard from Chris Noon, Partner at Hymans Robertson, and Laurence Baxter, Head of Policy & Research at The Chartered Insurance Institute (CII).

The 2015 Budget and the Comprehensive Spending Review confounded expectations through revealing a revised projected increase of public finance provisions of £27 billion by 2020 thereby enabling the Government to halt proposed tax credit cuts. It also saw the Chancellor stick to his promise of maintaining real terms spending on health, schools and defence while further cutting local government coffers. The 2016 Budget will undoubtedly contain its own surprises, including an anticipated announcement regarding the future of pensions tax relief just one year on from “pension freedoms”.


For more information about the ILC-UK Partners Programme, please click on the below hyperlink:
ILC-UK PARTNERS PROGRAMME

Members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme are Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti, Hymans Robertson, Legal & General, Partnership, Prudential and Retirement Advantage.

 

Please see below for Ben Franklin's presentations slides from the event.

 

London Editorial Board: Tuesday 1st March 2016
Brussels Editorial Board: Friday 11th March 2016

The International Longevity Centre – UK has recently launched the European Adult Immunisation Hub: http://www.adultimmunisation.eu/ made possible through the kind support of Pfizer.

The website aims to highlight developments in adult immunisation as well as host new material. It currently hosts a range of multimedia resources targeted at policy makers, including videos, infographics and vaccination stories.

We are however keen to understand which type of resources you believe would best help to illustrate the need for increased vaccination coverage amongst adults to policy-makers. The first editorial boards of the European Adult Immunisation Hub (one held in London, the other in Brussels) will assemble medical practitioners, communications professionals and industry representatives to determine which resources the Adult Immunisation Hub should focus on and develop. We would also welcome any suggestions as to alternative approaches of increasing vaccination uptake amongst adults.

During the meeting there will be an opportunity for delegates to share their work with a wider audience. We will also be offering delegates the chance to film a short interview for the website before or after the meeting.

If you would like to register your interest for either the editorial boards, please contact Dave Eaton at davideaton@ilcuk.org.uk.

Pensions

Monday 25th January 2016, 14:30 - 16:30; House of Lords, London, SW1A 0AA

In July 2015, the Government began a consultation on changing how the UK incentivises private pension saving, and the Chancellor is expected to respond to this consultation in the Government’s annual Budget in March 2016.

The Future of Private Pension Saving, kindly supported by Age UK, brought together Parliamentarians, business, academics and industry experts to discuss how best the UK Government can incentivise private pension saving.

The debate was opened by initial remarks from Angela Rayner MP (Shadow Pensions Minister), Jackie Wells (Head of Policy and Research, Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association), Sarah Luheshi (Deputy Director, Pensions Policy Institute), and Yvonne Braun (Director, Long-Term Savings Policy, Association of British Insurers).

On Wednesday 27th January, David John, Senior Strategic Policy Adviser at AARP’s Public Policy Institute, and Deputy Director of the Retirement Security Project at the Brookings institute delivered a presentation on tax incentives for pension saving in the US context at an informal reception hosted by Age UK.

Discussions from this event contributed to a formal representation to the HM Treasury regarding Government policy on pensions tax relief and private pension saving.
 

Future of Age,Pensions,Quality of Life

Tuesday 1st December 2015; 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 10:30; Prudential Auditorium, M&G, Governors House, 5 Laurence Pountney Hill, London EC4R 0HH

This launch event of a new ILC-UK report 'Understanding Retirement Journeys: Expectations vs reality', was kindly supported by Prudential.

Building on ILC-UK’s extensive work on older consumers and on retirement income, this major research report assesses the differences between theory or popular belief about retirement and the reality of it.

The report considers how spending varies during old age and challenges pre-existing stereotypes about retired life which can be misleading and may contribute to poor planning or unrealistic expectations. This report, which incorporates new quantitative analysis and the feedback from 3 expert focus groups, will explore the role for policymakers and industry in helping us retire well.

The full report and an executive summary are available to download here.

Please see below for the presentation slides from the event.

Pensions

Thursday 26th November 2015, 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 10:30; Committee Room G, House of Lords, London, SW1A 0PW

An Age UK and ILC-UK debate

The Spending Review, published on 25th November 2015 set out the Governments plans to deliver additional departmental savings with a view to eliminating Britain’s deficit by 2019-2020.

Government Departments were asked to model the impact of real term spending cuts of between 25% and 40%. At the same time some Departments had already been given an assurance that their spending will be protected. The Government has committed to invest in both the NHS and defence whilst also continuing to protect spending on education and foreign aid.

Because of the scale of cuts planned and the fact that some Departmental spending is protected, other Departments face significant funding cuts.

This event took place the morning after the Spending Review had been announced. Participants were  asked to consider:

  • How will the spending review impact on the future provision of adult social care?
  • How has long term funding for later life been impacted by the spending review?
  • Following the spending review, what are the priorities for policy action for the next year?

Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society at ILC-UK responded to the Spending Review, and outlined its potential implications for the social care system, and the future of the State.

Please see below for his presentation.

Care,Economics of Age,Future of Age,Health,Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Tuesday, 24th November 2015; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 17:00; 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

The Future of Ageing took place on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London. For details of this year's conference, visit www.futureofageing.org.uk.

We were grateful to Eli Lilly, McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and Partnership for Change for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day.

During the conference, we painted a picture of the future of ageing and explored the challenges and opportunities ahead. Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explored the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrows.

We explored five key areas:

  • The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society.
  • The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty?
  • The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing?
  • The future of our built environment in an ageing society.
  • The future of ageing research.

We heard presentations from:

  • Baroness Altmann (Minister for Pensions);
  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science);
  • Lord Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]);
  • Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change);
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
  • Jim Boyd (Director of Corporate Affairs at Partnership) - Jim Boyd stepped in at short notice for Steve Groves who was unwell;
  • Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council);
  • Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson);
  • Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust)
  • Elaine Draper (Director, Accessibility & Inclusion, Barclays)
  • Mario Ambrosi (Head of Communications and Public Affairs, Anchor) and
  • Baroness Kay Andrews (Member of the House of Lords Built Environment Committee, Former Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) 2006-2009)

The conference was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) and Lawrence Churchill (Trustee, ILC-UK). The full conference brochure, including biographies for each of speakers, is available to view here - ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference Brochure

This was a paid-for conference with an early bird rate available until a few month before the conference.
 

See below for the presentations slides from the day.


See below for an agenda from the day.

ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference 2015 - AGENDA


 


We were grateful to Eli Lilly, McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and Partnership for Change for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day

 

   

   
 

    

 

 

Care

Thursday 19th November, 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) - 16:30, ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminister, London, SW1P 3QB

On Thursday 19th November, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) in partnership with Independent Age launched a major new report on migration and social care. 

'Moved to Care' explores future demand for adult social care, and estimated the potential impact of migration policy on the ability of the care workforce to meet demand.

With demand for adult social care set to rise in line with longevity, the supply of skilled and caring staff will become increasingly critical, yet there are big questions about where this supply of workers is going to come from. Against the backdrop of continued fiscal consolidation, including inevitable cuts in spending on care services, and all political parties planning to “get tough on migration”, we will need to challenge current political orthodoxies and think up creative solutions in order to deliver the type of care that many will need over the years ahead. Given the current direction of travel, it has perhaps never been more important to take stock of how we might practically develop policies to ensure adequate provision of long-term care over the decades to come.

Please see below for a copy of the presentations delivered at the launch.


To read the report in full, and access an executive summary, please click here.


To read a summary of the interviews Independent Age conducted with migrant care workers, please click here.

 

Pensions

Thursday 12th November 2015; 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 11:00; ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminster, London, SW1P 3QB

In 2014 the UK Government announced radical proposals which now allow people to withdraw money from their pension pot from age 55, subject to their marginal rate of income tax in that year.

The main effect of this change will be to put more onus on the individual to ensure they manage their resources to last for their retirement and also removes the obligation to annuitise their funds at any future age.

During this ILC-UK Centre for Later Life Funding debate, Professor Les Mayhew of Cass Business School presented a new paper which explores how individuals can best use their pension pots to align them with their own personal financial objectives and longevity risks.

Industry representatives, including Trevor Llanwarne (Trustee, ILC-UK), Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans), and Jackie Wells, (Head of Policy and Research, NAPF) responded to the paper by Professor Mayhew, and the audience debated the report's findings.

To view Professor Les Mayhew's presentation given at the launch, please see below.

 

Health,Quality of Life

Monday 2nd November 2015; 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) – 16:30; The Annie Altschul/ Agnes Hunt Rooms, 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

ILC-UK held a panel discussion to launch the Drink Wise, Age Well programme.

The event brought together important stakeholders to discuss the growing problem of alcohol misuse in the over 50s population of the UK. Supported  by the Big Lottery Fund, Drink Wise, Age Well brings together 6 strategic partners; Addaction, the Royal Voluntary Service, International Longevity Centre UK, Drugs and Alcohol Charities Wales, Addiction Northern Ireland and the University of Bedfordshire.

With at least 20% of over 50s in the UK exceeding recommended alcohol units, and alcohol related harms significantly increasing in this age group, Drink Wise, Age Well will aim to create a healthier relationship with alcohol for the overs 50s population  through a preventative approach.

As part of our programme evaluation we have recently carried out a survey of drinking behaviour in people aged 50 and over which more than 17,000 people completed.

Joining our panel to discuss this important and growing issue were:

  • Simon Antrobus, CEO, Addaction (Chair)
  • Dr Sarah Wadd, Director, Substance misuse and Ageing Research Team at the Tilda Goldberg Centre, University of Bedfordshire
  • Dr Kieran Moriarty, Consultant Physician and Gastroenterologist, Bolton NHS FT
  • Don Lavoie, Alcohol Programme Manager, Alcohol Team, Public Health England
  • Professor José Iparraguirre, Chief Economist, Age UK


The presentation slides from the event are availabe to view below.

Care,Economics of Age,Future of Age

Sunday 4th October; 18:30 (for a 19:00 dinner) – 21:00; Manchester (outside the secure zone)

In early 2015 it was announced that Greater Manchester will become the first region in England to gain full control of health spending, with 10 local authorities taking over a combined health and social care budget of approximately £6 billion.

This innovation in health care is a good opportunity to achieve joined up health and social care, a move which could improve financial sustainability of health systems as well as improving the health and wellbeing of populations.
This policy has the potential to improve the success of health innovations which have a focus on prevention. The priorities and responsibilities of local government are markedly different from central government, as it is local councils that fund other areas which may benefit from a preventative approach to health care, for example social care, housing and leisure facilities. There is therefore a direct economic interest for local authorities to, for example, delay admission into care homes, or reduce childhood obesity.

The reforms in Manchester provide a positive opportunity to take a preventative approach to health care, and are a significant opportunity to meet the challenge of the big, cross-sectional challenges resulting from demographic change.
But will the reforms deliver their promise? During this dinner debate we will consider

  • How can we ensure the devolution of health spending results in increasing focus on preventative health?
  • How can we maximise improvements in health and social care whilst also saving money?
  • How will we know if the Manchester initiative has succeeded? How should we measure success?
  • Where next for integration between health and social care?

This is a private, invitation only, dinner debate so spaces are limited and will be made available on a first come first served basis. Email: davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk for more information.

Health

Wednesday 16th September 2015, 19:00 (for a 19:30 start), London

This private, invitation-only, dinner is to launch the first report of the Sustainable Older Society 2020 project from the International Longevity Centre - UK, with support from EY. The report, Adding Life to Years not Years to Life: Creating a Sustainable 21st Century Healthcare System, has sourced a bank of robust innovative global case studies, identified significant trends in the global health environment and assessed key influencing factors in the success and replicability of these health innovations. We believe the health and social care innovations identified all have the ability to drive improved patient and delivery outcomes with significant cost savings.

This dinner will be the UK launch of the report and will discuss how the UK, faced with the twin challenges of limited resources and an ageing population, can ensure current health provision is sustainable. This report has identified a number of trends which pose challenges including the rise of NCDs, the reactive nature of current healthcare policy and the changing nature of health spending; there are however trends which give reason for optimism including advances in healthcare technology, advances in the use of big data and integrated care.

This report has been endorsed and steered by an advisory group of high level health and social care professionals including representatives from Public Health England, a former special advisor on health and social care, Walgreens Boots Alliance, AIG and EY. For change to happen we need the right people around the same table; to discuss what the barriers are to achieving a health system which properly values prevention, innovation and integration and, most importantly, to discuss how to overcome these barriers.

Alongside the report, SOS 2020 will be releasing a ‘Manifesto for Action’. One of the primary purposes of the dinner will be to discuss how we can advance these pledges and ensure prevention and public is health is further embedded in healthcare delivery. The pledge includes calls for the adoption of personal budgets and personalised care plans, for premature mortality from NCDs to be reduced by 25% by 2025 and for NHS England to explore the cost effectiveness of expanding the diabetes prevention programme to cover the highest cost NCDs such as dementia and cardiovascular disease.

For more infomation about SOS 2020, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Health

Tuesday 15th September 2015; 15:30-17:00; House of Lords, Westminster, London, SW1A 0PW

ILC-UK held a launch event for a new piece of research, Rethining Cancer. The Big ‘C’: Quantifying the social and economic impact of cancer. This report, kindly supported by Bristol-Myers Squibb*, investigates the wider social and economic impact of cancer in the UK.

We heard brief presentations from the one of the authors of the report, Brian Beach (ILC-UK Research Fellow), Emlyn Samuel (Senior Policy Manager, Cancer Research UK) and Debbie Abrahms MP (MP for Oldham East and Saddleworth; Member of the Work and Pensions Committee).

Cancer is the cause of one in four deaths in the UK, ending the lives of over 160,000 people every year and causing huge damage to families and communities. Survival rates have improved significantly in recent decades. Advances in cancer diagnosis, treatment and care will enable further progress to be made. However, population ageing is likely to result in rising cancer incidence, with the annual number of diagnoses expected to rise from around 330,000 per year today to 430,000 per year by 2030.

This report highlights the benefits of increasing survival rates and illustrating the value of improving support for survivors. It also evaluates the impact of cancer deaths on our economy, through lost employment, and the damage done to communities, through the loss of volunteers and informal caregivers.

*Bristol-Myers Squibb provided financial sponsorship to cover the costs of producing the report and the event launch. The company had no input to the report and ILC retained full editorial control.

Care,Communities and Housing

Wednesday 19th August 2015; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) – 18:00, followed by a drinks reception; Rennie Room, One Great George Street, London, SW1P 3AA

On the 19th August, we held a launch event of a new research report “Village life:Independence, Loneliness, and Quality of Life in Retirement Villages with Extra Care” which considers the impact of retirement villages on independence, loneliness and quality of life of residents.

The report incorporates a survey of residents and compares the sample with a comparable group of non-residents living in private housing.

The report was produced with the support of Bupa and Audley. Anchor provided additional survey respondents.

During the launch, Brian Beach, Research Fellow at ILC-UK, presented the findings of the research. Nick Sanderson, CEO of Audley, and Jeremy Porteus, Founder and Director or Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network), responded.

Following the presentations, there was an opportunity for debate, followed by a wine reception.

'Village Life: Independence, Loneliness, and Quality of Life in Retirement Villages with Extra Care' is available to download here.

Brian Beach's presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Care

Wednesday 22nd July; 15:00 - 17:00; Millbank House, House of Lords, London

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a high level stakeholder workshop, 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action', in London in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion with key stakeholders- including representatives from government, health and social care, and the charity sector- where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Care

Monday 20th July 2015; 14:00 (for 14:30) – 16:30; Health Education South London, Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DN

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action' workshop in London in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion, where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

This event is now at capacity.

Care

Thursday 16th July 2015; 14:00 (for 14:30) – 16:30; University Hospital Bristol Education Centre, Upper Maudlin Street, Bristol, BS2 8AE

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action' workshop in Bristol in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion, where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

This event is now at capacity.

Technology

Monday, 13th July 2015; 18.00 – 20:00; 34th Floor, BT Tower, 45 Maple Street, London, W1T 4JZ

We are delighted to invite you to the launch of our new report - Designing solutions for an ageing society.

We are grateful to BT for hosting this evening reception.

The ILC-UK has been working together with the Institution of Engineering and Technology and the Engineering Design Centre at the University of Cambridge to explore the potential for design and technology to meet the needs of our ageing society.

At an experts workshop in May we investigated the cross cutting opportunities for good design, engineering and technology, not only to improve the quality of life, but also elicit significant cost savings for government and health care providers. This report pulls together the ideas discussed at this workshop and details:

  • Ways in which existing technology might be better applied
  • The opportunities for technology transfers across different sectors and industries
  • The barriers to implementing new technologies


This evening reception will be a great chance to both learn more about the work and to network with those working in the technology and ageing space.

THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL and we are unable to accept drop-ins on the day.

Please note that the BT Tower has strict security regulations:

  • Delegates must register if they would like to attend this event.
  • We are unable to accept drop-ins on the day.
  • All attendees are required to provide photo ID on arrival and will also pass through an airport style security check.

More information about these security procedures will be sent closer to the event date.


We look forward to welcoming you on the 13th July 2015

Kind Regards

Alan Howard, The Institution of Engineering and Technology
David Sinclair, International Longevity Centre - UK
John Clarkson, Engineering Design Centre University of Cambridge

Care

Wednesday 8th July 2015; 14:00 (for 14:30) – 16:30; Manchester Art Gallery, Mosley Street, Manchester M2 3JL

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action' workshop in Manchester in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion, where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

This event is now at capacity.

Pensions,Work and Retirement

Friday 26th June 2015; 08:00 (for an 08:30 start) – 10:00; Great Hall, Chartered Insurance Institute, 20 Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HY

I am delighted to invite you to the ILC-UK’s launch of the new Centre for Later Life Funding. This new body will focus explicitly on finding solutions to the retirement funding issues facing older people and represents a coalition of private sector organisations and charities working to support the funding needs of today’s retirees.

Eventbrite - ILC-UK’s launch of the Centre for Later Life Funding

This Parliament will see sweeping changes to the long term savings and later life funding landscape. There will be the continued roll out of auto-enrolment which should, at least, raise the numbers of people saving for retirement. At the same time, consumers and the pensions industry will be getting accustomed to the new freedom and choice offered to those with defined contribution pension pots. “Freedoms” may well be extended to those who have already annuitised so that they can sell their annuity on for some cash value. And let’s not forget that we will also, finally, see the introduction of the cap on adult social care costs and a new, more generous means test.

This is some agenda, and no doubt there will be further significant policy changes coming over the next five years.

Within this context, this event will explore the big later life funding questions facing the new government, and by implication key stakeholders across the sector:

  • How the freedom and choice agenda relates to retirement planning for later life.
  • How the cap on care costs and the new means test will work in practise.
  • Whether new products and services can be developed to meet care funding needs.
  • How housing wealth could be used to pay for later life costs in an equitable way.
  • What role pensions products can play in funding care in later life.
  • How the integration of health and care might influence the financial planning decisions of individuals.
  • Whether continued fiscal consolidation mean individuals will have to pay more to get quality care and support.

The event will begin with a short presentation outlining the context from the ILC-UK, before a panel discussion with experts giving their considered views. There will also be considerable time given for questions from the audience.
 

Agenda for the event

08:00 - 08:30
Registration

08:30 - 08:35 - Welcome and Opening Comments
Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive, Care England; Chairman, ILC-UK

08:35 - 08:45 - Presentation
Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society, ILC-UK

08:45 - 09:05 - Panel Responses
Jane Vass, Head of Public Policy, Age UK
Laurence Baxter, Head of Policy and Research, Chartered Insurance Institute
Jackie Wells, Head of Policy & Research, National Association of Pension Funds
Tim Fassam, Head of Public Affairs, Prudential

09:05 - 09:50 - Discussion and Q&A

09:50 - 10:00 - Closing Comments
Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive, Care England; Chairman, ILC-UK


About the Centre for Later Life Funding

The Centre for Later Life Funding is, in part, a continuation of its predecessor body the Care Funding Advice Network (CFAN) – a coalition of organisations and individuals seeking to improve on the Care Bill’s recognition of the need for financial advice.

The Centre represents a significant expansion in terms of scope and output to include regular policy briefings and research papers which consider not just questions about care funding but questions about funding retirement more broadly. We think that the artificial separation of retirement funding from care funding is unhelpful given that long-term care can be one of the biggest costs that people face during their retirement years, and the new “cap” will not change that fact.


We hope you can join us for what should be an important and timely event.

Yours sincerely

Baroness Greengross
Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre UK

Future of Age,Health,Transport

Thursday 18th June 2015; 15:00 (for a 15:15 start) - 17:00; Westminster, London

The International Longevity Centre-UK, supported by Age UK hosted an event for the launch of new research,The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society.

Demographic change will require a rethinking of current transport strategies. New approaches are needed to ensure that our growing population of older people are able to remain active and mobile during later life. To this end ILC-UK is working with Age-UK to try to set the agenda for the future age-friendly transport policy. 

Through The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society project we have developed innovative solutions to the many transport challenges faced by older people. Combining quantitative research using the English Longitudinal Survey of Ageing with the contributions from an expert workshop held in April the report highlights the changes needed during this new Parliament.

A full agenda for this event will be available closer to the event date.

Future of Age

Thursday 14th May 2015; 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) – 17:00; London, WC2N

The ILC-UK is working together with the Institution of Engineering and Technology and the Engineering Design Centre of the University of Cambridge to explore the potential for design and technology to deliver improvements in healthcare services allied to cost savings in the context of an ageing society.

Population ageing will result in soaring health and social care costs in the coming years, as strokes, falls, Alzheimer’s and many other age related illnesses become more prevalent. Projections show that the financial cost of dementia alone will rise to £34.8 billion in England by 2026, a rise of 135 per cent since 2007.

Through this workshop we aim to investigate the cross cutting opportunities for good design, engineering and technology, not only to improve the quality of life, but also elicit significant cost savings for government and health care providers.
We wish to:

  • Identify how existing technology could be better applied
  • Highlight the opportunities for technology transfers across different sectors and industries
  • Stimulate ideas for the development of new technologies

The project will pinpoint which interventions from industry, individuals and government might maximise the financial and health benefits and will also identify barriers to putting those solutions into practice

The workshop will provide the basis for a report to influence government policy makers, which will be showcased later in the year.

This is a private workshop. However, if you are interested in attending, please contact events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Health,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Thursday 30th April 2015; Bloomsbury, London; 17:45 (for an 18:00 start) – 19:45, followed by a drinks reception.

BBC Question Time, with David Cameron, Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg, presented by David Dimbleby was shown during the drinks reception following the event.

With a week to go until the General Election took place, ILC-UK and Independent Age organised a debate on Thursday 30th April. Away from the heat and fury of the election campaign, we hoped to create a chance to have a real debate to identify the most important priorities for all political parties, if the UK is truly going to rise to the challenge of a rapidly ageing population, in the next Parliament.

Following the 2014 launch of 2030 Vision: The Best and Worst Futures for Older People in the UK, Independent Age invited more than 30 opinion formers and leading charities and think tanks to blog their views on what we need to do to get ready for demographic change. The blogs kick-started a consultation which saw over 300 people respond, sharing their own hopes and fears of growing older in the UK. The results of this consultation were published in Independent Age’s November 2014 document, ‘2030 Vision: What we have learnt’ – http://www.independentage.org/media/894910/2030visioninterim.pdf.

Six big themes emerged:

  • Ageist attitudes still exist and many people worry they will face discrimination or becoming hidden members of society
  • Older people worry about the cost of living and many fear they are being financially squeezed
  • Older people are increasingly concerned about the future quality and sustainability of health and social care services
  • Older people worry about feeling lonely, but they also have concerns about feeling cut off as digital services increasingly replace face-to-face service provision
  • Older people want to continue making a positive contribution to their neighbourhoods and communities
  • Older people have a keen sense of what’s fair and how their contributions should be rewarded in retirement, but they also worry about how their children and grandchildren will fare

During this debate we considered older people’s main concerns as identified in the consultation and identified the priority areas that any incoming government should focus on. We hope to include these in an open letter which would be sent to the leaders of the three main political parties after the election, outlining how organisations working on older people’s issues believe we can build a better future for older people in the UK.

Speakers and panellists included: Briony Gunstone (YouGov), Caroline Abrahams (Age UK), Claire Turner (JRF) and Paul Cann (Campaign Management Group Partner at Campaign to End Loneliness; CEO, Age UK [Oxfordshire]). The event was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK) and Janet Morrison (Independent Age)

Following the debate, delegates were invited to join us for wine and canapés.

This was a private event.

Briony Gunstone's presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Future of Age

Wednesday 29 April 2015; Cordingley Lecture Theatre, Humanities Bridgeford Street, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL; 2.00pm-4.00pm, free networking lunch from 1.00pm

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the publication of Robert Butler's seminal work: Why Survive Being Old in America (Harper & Row, 1975). The book, possibly the most powerful account of ageing ever written, set forward both the state of knowledge about ageing and as well as a political and social manifesto for improving the lives of older people. Some of the concepts developed in the book, notably those associated with what Butler termed ageism, have become a key part of the vocabulary for describing the pressures and constraints facing older people. Butler himself went to become a major figure in the development of gerontology and geriatrics and was the first director of the US National Institute on Ageing. In this lecture, Professor Bengston, who knew Robert Butler over a span of four decades, will talk both about his work and its relevance for understanding and studying the lives of older people today.

Professor Bengston is himself a leading figure in American gerontology. He is a past-President of the Gerontological Society of America; he received a Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Sociological Association's Section on Aging and the Life Course. Professor Bengston has published 16 books and 260 research papers on gerontology, theories of ageing, sociology of ageing and family sociology. Early in his career, Vern began the Longitudinal Study of Generations, a multi-disciplinary investigation of families, ageing and social change. He was also a key figure in the establishment of USC's Andrus Gerontology Center and Davis School of Gerontology.

Please register here for this free event.

Pensions

Part of the ILC-UK ‘Understand Ageing’ Workshop Series

Thursday 23rd April 2015; ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminster, London, SW1P 3QB; 13:30 (for 14:00 start) – 17:00. Lunch will be available from 13:30.


The new pension freedoms which come into force in April 2015 will transform the “at retirement” market. At the same time, a challenging economic environment poses a threat to UK savings rates and retirement incomes over the long term.


This half day workshop will focus on helping you see the wood from the trees in the context of constant policy change and a challenging global economic environment.


The workshop will be presented by ILC-UK Senior Research Fellow, Ben Franklin, formerly of HM Treasury, the Financial Conduct Authority and the Chartered Insurance Institute.


Part of this workshop will explore the impact of the macro-economic context on retirement incomes including:

  • What might our economic future look like and what are its implications for savers and investors?
  • The impact of exceptional monetary policy conditions on consumer outcomes;
  • How can auto-enrolment and other policy levers aimed at inducing or “nudging” increased savings be able to compete with this broader macroeconomic picture?


The second part of the workshop will explore how individuals might respond to the new pension freedoms and the implications for consumers, products and services.

  • How are people likely to respond to the new environment?
  • What are consumer preferences for taking a retirement income?
  • What barriers to consumers face to making good decisions?
  • What do different “at retirement” choices mean for income in retirement?
  • Which consumer groups stand to lose the most by making bad decisions and what the implications for how they will fund retirement? 
  • What are the early indications of how consumers are responding to the pension freedoms?


Discussion time will provide an opportunity for you to discuss and consider the impact of these changes on your organisation.


Who should attend?
Individuals or organisations:

  • Who want to consider the business opportunities and challenges emerging from the new policy environment
  • Producing products for the “retirement” marketplace
  • Interested in the future of retirement incomes
  • Interested in understanding the impact of the new pension freedoms
  • Interested in exploring how new policy may interact with the macro-economic environment


Dates
The workshop will take place on Thursday 23rd April 2015, 13:30 – 14:00, with lunch available from 13:30.


Cost
Attendance at workshop:
£350+VAT (corporate)
£200+VAT (not for profit)


Interested parties must register to attend this course via the button below. We will be unable to accept drop-ins on the day.
Eventbrite - The future of pensions and long-term savings. Risks and opportunities in a challenging economic environment. An ILC-UK Workshop


Cancellations
There is a £100 non-refundable charge on all bookings.
Cancellations within 7 days of the course will be charged 50% of the full cost
Cancellations within 1 day of the course are non-refundable


Other workshops
ILC-UK organise bespoke workshops for organisations and companies, specifically designed to your interests. For example, we will run future sessions on specific aspects of ageing (e.g. dementia; older workers; economics of ageing). ILC-UK also runs workshops and presents to Corporate and Charity Board’s on the opportunities and challenges of ageing. Please contact David Sinclair for more information.

Work and Retirement

Wednesday 22nd April; Friends Life, One New Change, EC4M 9EF, London; 12:00 (for a 12:30 start) - 15:00

You are invited to attend the launch of 'The Missing Million - Recommendations for Action', the third in the series of three Missing Million reports. The event is taking place as part of Responsible Business Week and will see us set out the recommendations that will drive real change on age at work.

The first in the series (The Missing Million: Illuminating the employment challenges of the older 50s) set out the challenge we face – the million people over 50 who have been pushed out of the labour market against their will. The second (The Missing Million: Pathways back into employment) described the barriers older people face as they seek to return to work. This third report sets out our recommendations for action – what business and government can do to prevent early exit from the workplace, and what government can do to support people to stay in work and to work longer, as our population is ageing.

Simon Fanshawe is chairing, and delegates will have the chance to hear from a number of companies including Friends Life, Walgreens Boots Alliance and the Co-Operative about their work on this agenda. We will also hear from the TUC about the practical action they are taking in workplaces to support working longer.

Registration for this event closes on Tuesday 14th April. If you are interested in attending, please register via the link below:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/age-at-work-the-missing-million-recommendations-for-action

Transport

Friday 17th April 2015;  10.30 – 17.00; London

ILC-UK is delighted to announce a Futures Workshop, The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society.

Demographic change will require a rethinking of current transport strategies. New approaches are needed to ensure that our growing population of older people are able to remain active and mobile during later life. To this end ILC-UK is working with Age-UK to try to set the agenda for the future age-friendly transport policy. 

Through The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society project we want to develop innovative solutions to the many transport challenges faced by older people. With this aim in mind, on the 17th of April 2015 we are hosting a day long futures workshop. This interactive workshop aims to bring policy makers, transport experts, and academics together with older people to discuss and develop transport innovations.

This is a private workshop. However, if you are interested in attending, please contact events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Pensions,Work and Retirement

Monday 16th March 2015; 08:00 (for an 8:30 start) – 10:00; Great Hall, Chartered Insurance Institute, 20 Aldermanbury, London, EC2V 7HY

On the 16th of March we launched “Here today, gone tomorrow: How today’s retirement choices could affect financial resilience over the long term?”, new ILC-UK research made possible with the support of Aviva.

Launching two days before the 2015 budget and less than a month before the new pensions freedoms come into effect, we believe this report is timely. While the new freedoms have been a source of much debate and speculation since they were announced in the Budget of 2014, there has been little or no quantitative research into the long-term impact on retirees’ finances.

This report is the first detailed exploration of what certain choices made today could mean for overall levels of retirement income adequacy over the next 30 years. Using in-depth analysis of the largest representative survey of people over 50 in England (the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing), it quantifies the potential level of consumer harm associated with particular choices and outlines which consumer segments are most at risk of facing income shortfalls if they make certain decisions. It is therefore a must read for industry, regulators, policymakers and consumer bodies.

This report is the first part of a wider programme of ILC-UK work entitled Sustainable Older Society 2020 (SOS 2020). The SOS 2020 project aims to develop intergenerational solutions to deliver an economically sustainable and long term approach to an ageing society. There are two branches to the project, this one which focuses on finance and another with a focus on health.

Chair: Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK)
Speakers included: David Thomson (CII), Ben Franklin (ILC-UK), Jackie Spencer (Money Advice Service), John Lawson (Aviva UK), Jackie Wells (NAPF)

Ben Franklin's slides from the event are available below:

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Global Ageing

Tuesday 24th February 2015; 10:00 - 16:00; ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminster, London, SW1P 3QB

A one day workshop to help individuals and organisations to maximise their understanding of the impact of our ageing society.

This workshop will incorporate expert presentations and discussion on:

  • How our society is ageing? [Understanding demographic change]
  • What are the implications of ageing for our economy? [older consumers; macro-economic impact of ageing; older workers]
  • How are policymakers and companies responding to the challenges of ageing?
  • The future opportunities and challenges of ageing?

The interactive workshop will be limited to 15 participants to allow for discussion. Discussion time will provide an opportunity for you to discuss and consider the impact of demographic change on you and your organisation.


Why should I attend?

Gain a rapid introduction into ageing research and policy in just one day
Network with other organisations interested in ageing
Understand the potential opportunities and challenges which emerge from an ageing society including:

  • the myths and realities of the older consumer
  • the importance of health and care in an ageing society
  • the international context of ageing
  • the role of older workers
  • the role of public policy
  • the role of the private and voluntary sector
  • supporting strong intergenerational relations


Who should attend?
Individuals or organisations:

  • Interested in a rapid introduction to ageing policy and research
  • Interested in marketing to older consumer
  • Interested in how the ageing society will impact on society
  • Interested in managing an older workforce
  • Interested in working with older people

This course will be suitable for people completely new to ageing and to those who want to develop their knowledge and thinking on the issues and challenges ahead.


Dates
The first workshop will take place in central London on Tuesday 24th February 2015; 10:00 - 16:00. Lunch will be included.


Cost
Attendance at workshop:
£400+VAT (corporate)
£250+VAT (not for profit)
Free (ILC-UK Partners Programme Members)

Interested parties must register to attend this course below. We will be unable to accept drop-ins on the day.

Eventbrite - Understanding Ageing – An ILC-UK one day workshop


Cancellations
There is a £50 non-refundable charge on all bookings.
Cancellations within 7 days of the course will be charged 50% of the full cost
Cancellations within 1 day of the course are non-refundable


Other workshops
ILC-UK organise bespoke workshops for organisations and companies, specifically designed to your interests. For example, we will run future sessions on specific aspects of ageing (e.g. dementia; older workers; economics of ageing). ILC-UK also run workshops and present to Corporate and Charity Board’s on the opportunities and challenges of ageing. Please contact David Sinclair  for more information.

Pensions,Work and Retirement

Monday 23rd February 2015; 10:30 (for an 11:00 start) - 12:30 followed by a sandwich lunch;
M&G, Governor’s House, Laurence Pountney Hill, London, EC4R 0HH

This event was the launch of the new ILC-UK report “Towards a new Pensions Commission”, supported by Prudential.

2015 will mark the 10th Anniversary of the Pensions Commission. Since this time, there have been a whole plethora of policy changes that have affected the pensions landscape, some of which were first proposed by the Pensions Commission and some of which were not.

In a press release issued on the 26th January, ILC-UK project that despite auto-enrolment, the savings ratio is likely to continue to fall up until 2020, posing significant risk to long term retirement incomes.

This new ILC-UK report explores whether or not a new Pensions Commission is necessary and what form such a commission might take.

At this event we discussed the key issues raised in the ILC-UK work including:

  • The impacts of auto-enrolment and changes to the State Pension age
  • The implications of recent macro-economic developments for pensions policy making in the coming years
  • The possible effects of the new pension freedoms
  • The role of a Pensions Commission in the current economic and policy environment

Slides from the event are available below.

Quality of Life

Thursday 19th February, 15:30 (for a 16:00 start) – 18:00.
The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), 11 Tufton Street, London, SW1P 3QB

This event launched our new reports on social connections and wellbeing in older age. These important reports highlight the key findings of new research, undertaken by Professor Andrew Steptoe, Dr Snorri Rafnsson and Dr Aparna Shankar, identifying the aspects of social connections which are most relevant to well-being in older adults. This project wasa collaboration between UCL and ILC-UK, and was kindly funded by ESRC.

The research aims to answer a series of questions including:

  • Which aspects of social connections are associated with life satisfaction, quality of life and positive affect in older adults?
  • How does well-being change over time amongst older adults?
  • What impact do the different stages of caring have on the wellbeing of older carers?

The reports then link the findings to current policy to make a series of recommendations.

As loneliness and isolation shoot up the public agenda as a priority, this research will add a new dimension to the debate currently being played out in Government and the media. The event will include presentations from the researchers, and responses from a panel of experts, before the debate is opened up to the floor for questions. This will be followed by a short drinks reception. We would greatly value your insights into the topic at the report launch, and hope that you can join us.

Slides from the event are available below.

Communities and Housing,Dementia,Quality of Life

Tuesday 27th January 2015; 15:30 – 17:00; House of Lords, London

Eventbrite - Report Launch: Inquiry into Electrical Safety in an Ageing Society

On behalf of the ILC-UK and Electrical Safety First, we invite you to celebrate the launch of our report on the challenges our ageing population poses to electrical safety.

The report is a culmination of extensive research, a ‘call’ for information, an evidence session attended by experts in the fields of housing and dementia, and a high-level review group. This has all helped form this final report, which we will launch on the 27th January 2015.

With the support of Electrical Safety First, we hope the report will highlight the often maligned importance of maintaining high levels of electrical safety, and draw attention to the challenges our ageing population poses to electrical safety. The inquiry has identified two key areas – housing and dementia – which the report will focus on. An increase in the number of older people, both with and without dementia, means that the need to create a home environment which is as safe as possible has never been greater.

We will be inviting a range of guests, some of whom will have taken part in the enquiry but also a wider audience of journalists, politicians and experts in the fields of housing policy and dementia. We do hope you will be able to join us for this very special event.

 

Older Consumers,Work and Retirement

Wednesday 14th January 2015; 08:30 (for an 08:45 start) - 10:30; EY, 1 More London Place, London SE1 2AF

During the 2014 Budget, the Chancellor announced widespread reforms for individuals accessing defined contribution pensions at retirement. Most dramatically, he proposed abolishing the effective requirement to annuitise altogether. Under the new system anyone, regardless of the size of their pension pot, will be able to choose between drawdown or other products, annuitisation or full withdrawal, but they need to know what to do.

On 14th January 2015, ILC-UK published a major piece of qualitative and quantitative consumer research which explores how people might behave under the new policy framework and ascertain what their preferences are for taking an income in retirement and why.

During the event and debate we explored:

  • What consumers plan to do as a result of the new pension freedoms?
  • The extent to which consumers understand the decisions they are likely to need to make to best realise an income in retirement
  • How to make guidance and advice effective?

The research has been supported by a consortium of industry partners (Just Retirement, LV, Partnership, Key Retirement and EY).


Agenda from the event

08:30 - 08:45 - Registration

08:45 - 08:50 - Welcome by Chair
Lawrence Churchill (ILC-UK Trustee)

08:50 - 09:00 - Presentation of research
Ben Franklin (Senior Research Fellow, ILC-UK)

09:00 - 09:25 - Presentations from:
The Rt Hon. the Lord Hutton of Furness (Former Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (2005-07); Member of the Public Service and Demographic Change Committee (2013 - 13))
Dean Mirfin (Group Director - KR Group, Key Retirement)
Dr Ros Altmann (UK Government's Older Workers Business Champion)
Maggie Craig (Acting Head of Savings and Investment Division; Policy, Risk & Research Division, Financial Conduct Authority)

09:25 - 10:25 - Discussion and Q&A, including responses from additional panel members:
Jackie Wells (Head of Policy and Research, National Association of Pension Funds (NAPF))
Jane Vass (Head of Public Policy, Age UK)

10:25 - 10:30 - Close by Chair
Lawrence Churchill (ILC-UK Trustee)
 

Video clips from the event are available to view on YouTube here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx0qrJxTfk_boOY-agAjyEA
 

Presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Longevity

27th November 2014 from 14:30 (for a 15:00 start) to 17:00
Ashfords LLP Solicitors, 1 New Fetter Lane, London, EC4A 1AN
.


This event was held in conjunction with Compassion in Dying. The event was chaired by Baroness Greengross, and the Rt Hon Norman Lamb MP, Minister of State for Care and Support, and the Rt Hon Simon Hughes MP, Minister of State for Justice and Civil Liberties, gave the keynote addresses. 

This event outlined the importance of information and support regarding end-of-life rights and decision-making. It also launched Compassion in Dying’s ‘My Life, My Decision’ project which aims to support older people in their decision-making on end-of-life issues. Funded by the Big Lottery and run by Compassion in Dying, this project trains advocates and professionals to inform and support older people in their decision-making on end-of-life issues. We heard findings from a pilot version of the scheme in East London, focusing on the most effective ways to support older people to take up the patient preference tools provided for by the MCA 2005. 

Politics Home has written a full review of the event, available here. The speech given by Rt Hon Norman Lamb MP is available here.

Economics of Age,Work and Retirement

Thursday 20th November 2014
M&G Group, Governor’s House, Laurence Pountney Hill, London, EC4R 0HH

On the 20th November we were delighted to hold the launch of a new research report by ILC-UK on the importance of older workers for the European economy. This report was supported by Prudential who also kindly hosted the event.

Shadow Employment Minister, Stephen Timms MP, gave a keynote presentation at the event, discussing the imperitative of supporting older workers.

ILC-UK’s senior researcher Ben Franklin set out the ILC-UK reserach. He talked about:

  •     The extent to which older workers can boost EU economic output over a 30 year period.
  •     The future path of total working age population and employment across EU and member states.
  •     In which countries, increasing the participation of older workers will make the most difference to levels of output and per capita output.
  •     The relative importance of different barriers to working longer across the EU.  

A full set of Ben's slides are available below.
 

The presentation by Stephen Timms MP is available below.

Presentation by Stephen Timms MP

Agenda:
15:00 Registration
15:30 Welcome: Nigel Waterson, ILC-UK Trustee
15.35 Welcome: Tim Fassam, Prudential
15.40 Ben Franklin, ILC-UK, The economic impact of older workers across Europe
16.00 Stephen Timms MP, Shadow Employment Minister
16:30 Q&A and panel discussion
17:30 Close

 

 

Over the last12 months, ILC-UK, supported by the specialist insurance company, Partnership Assurance Group plc, undertook a series of events to explore the impact of demographic change on public policy.

This new ILC-UK Population Patterns Seminar Series considered the evidence base of our changing demography and explore how policy-makers need to respond to demographic change.

ILC-UK argues that demographic changes create significant long term challenges for Governments. Previous ILC-UK work on the Cost of Ageing has highlighted the projected growth in age related expenditure on health, care and pensions. It also highlighted the need for Government to do more to maximise the economic contribution of older people in light of demographic change.
 

Events from the Series
 

The End of the Census? Population Patterns Seminar Series supported by Partnership

Thursday 28th November 2013; 14:30 (for a 15:00 start) – 17:00; ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminster, London, SW1P 3QB

Chaired by Norma Cohen (FT), we welcomed presentations from Richard Willets (Director of Longevity, Partnership); Professor Peter Goldblatt (Deputy Director, Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, UCL Institute of Health Equity); Professor Heather Joshi (Professor of Economic and Developmental Demography, Emeritus Professor, Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Education University of London); Phil Rossall (Research Manager, Age UK) and Professor Ludi Simpson (Beyond 2011 Independent Working group, University of Manchester)

The presentation slides from this event can be viewed here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/the_end_of_the_census_population_patterns_seminar_series_supported_by_partn

The write-up from the event can be viewed and downloaded here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/the_end_of_the_census



Missing 90 year olds, an ILC-UK debate supported by Partnership as part of the Population Patterns Series

Wednesday 5th March 2014; 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 10:30; Committee Room G, House of Lords, Westminster

Far fewer people are living into their 90s than predicted. Data from the 2011 census revealed that there were 429,000 people in their 90s, rather than the 457,000 predicted. Similar patterns have been observed elsewhere, notably in the United States. So why is it that the population estimates are coming unstuck at this stage of the lifecourse?

This breakfast event was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK). Confirmed speakers included Richard Willets (Director of Longevity, Partnership), Angele Storey (Demographic Analysis Unit, ONS)  and Dave Grimshaw FIA (Partner, Barnett Waddingham LLP).

The presentation slides from this event can be viewed here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/missing_90_year_olds_an_ilc_uk_debate_supported_by_partnership_as_part_of_t

The write-up from the event can be viewed and downloaded here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/missing_90_year_olds

 

The demographic implications of Scottish independence. An ILC-UK debate supported by Partnership as part of the Population Patterns Series

Friday 02nd May 2014; 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 11:00; The Dome, New Register House, 3 West Register Street, Edinburgh, EH1 3YT

This breakfast discussion explored the different demographic makeup Scotland to England and the rest of the United Kingdom. It will explore for example, the differences in life expectancy and mortality between Scotland and England.

The presentation slides from this event can be viewed here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/the_demographic_implications_of_scottish_independence._an_ilc_uk_debate_sup

The write-up from the event can be viewed and downloaded here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/scottish_independence

 

ILC-UK 2014 Factpack launch. Population Patterns series supported by Partnership. (Hosted by Cass Business School)

Thursday 17th July 2014; LG001 – Auditorium, Cass Business School, 106 Bunhill Row, London, EC1Y 8TZ; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) - 18:30 followed by a short drinks reception

Following the successful launch of the 2013 ILC-UK Factpack ‘Ageing, longevity and demographic change: A Factpack of statistics from the International Longevity Centre-UK’ in June 2013, we will be producing an updated report to be launched at a summer event in London. The 2014 factpack will set out the evidence of our changing ageing society.

The presentation slides from this event can be viewed here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/ilc_uk_2014_factpack_launch._population_patterns_series_supported_by_partne

 

Europe’s Ageing Demography. An ILC-UK Population Patterns Seminar Series event, supported by Partnership

Wednesday 5th November 2014; European and Economic and Social Committee, TRE 7701, 7th floor, Trèves Building, 74 rue de Trèves, 1040 Brussels; 14:00 (for 14:30 start) – 17:00

There is growing awareness across Europe that its demography is changing. This discussion, held in Brussels ahead of the European Elections, considered how Europe’s population is changing and ageing.

The discussion explored:

  • Which European countries are ageing fastest?
  • How should European politicians respond to our ageing society?

The presentation slides from this event can be viewed here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/europes_ageing_demography._an_ilc_uk_population_patterns_seminar_series_eve

 

‘Silver Separators’ An ILC-UK event as part of the Population Patterns Seminar Series, supported by Partnership

Tuesday 18th November 2014; House of Lords, Westminster, London, SW1A 0AA; 15:30 (for a 16:00 start) - 18:00

Very little research has been done on the topic of “silver separators” – divorce later in life. Figures from the Office of National Statistics published last December did, however, make it a fertile ground for discussion in the national papers. The research showed that although divorce overall is currently becoming less common, divorce amongst those in their 60s rose by 58% on the 2011 figure, consistent with increasing rates of divorce amongst older generations that has been witnessed for the past 10 years  (Office of National Statistics, 2012). Since 1985 therefore the mean age at divorce has increased by 7.1 years for men and 7.2 years for women. 42% of marriages over all end in divorce and half of these will occur in the first ten years of marriage.

Amongst other thoughts, this discussion touched on:

  • What the implications might be of more people living alone?
  • To what extent do pensions and annuity providers need to consider this issue when advising clients?

The presentation slides from this event can be viewed here:
http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/events/silver_separators_an_ilc_uk_event_as_part_of_the_population_patterns_semina

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Older Consumers,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Tuesday 18th November 2014; House of Lords, Westminster, London, SW1A 0AA; 15:30 (for a 16:00 start) - 18:00

During 2014, ILC-UK, supported by the specialist insurer Partnership Assurance Group plc (Partnership), undertook a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

This was the final event in the Population Patterns Seminar Series and it explored the “silver separators”- divorce later in life. Figures from the Office for National Statistics published in 2012 showed a huge rise in the divorce rate amongst those in their 60s, with an increase of 58% on the 2011 figure. The last 10 years have seen more and more older people part ways, despite divorce amongst the general population becoming less common. This has happened to such an extent that the over 60’s are now the fastest growing divorce group in the UK.

A variety of reasons have been suggested , including a reduction in the stigma surrounding divorce and couples no longer feeling obliged to stay together if their attitudes and needs change.

However, figures released by the ONS in June 2012 revealed that marriages involving older people were also rising faster than for other age groups – up by 21% for women and by 25% for men in their late sixties. Re-partnership is likely to be even higher than these figures suggest, as older people in a new relationship may not choose to remarry.

During the event the discussion explored a number of themes, including:

  • What factors have contributed to the rising rate of divorce amongst the over 60s?
  • How can older people’s relationships be better supported?
  • What challenges does ageing present to relationships?
  • How do care responsibilities effect relationships?
  • What are the potential ramifications of older couples separating?


Agenda for the event

15:30 - 16:00
Registration

16:00 - 10:05
Welcome from:
Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK)

16:05 - 16:55
Presentations from:
Richard Willets (Partnership)
Rt Hon Paul Burstow MP (Member of Parliament for Sutton and Cheam)
Ben Franklin (ILC-UK)
Chris Sherwood (Relate)
Barbara Bloomfield (Co-author of ‘The Mature Times Guide to Love and Relationships in Later Life’)

16:55 - 17:55
Discussion and Q&A

17:55 - 18:00
Close from:
Baroness Sally Greengross
 

Presentation slides from the event:

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Health,International,Pensions

Wednesday 5th November 2014; European and Economic and Social Committee, TRE 7701, 7th floor, Trèves Building, 74 rue de Trèves, 1040 Brussels; 14:00 (for 14:30 start) – 17:00

This event was kindly hosted by the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC).

Throughout 2014, ILC-UK, supported by specialist insurer, Partnership Assurance Group plc (Partnership), has been undertaking a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

This event, as part of the Population Patterns Seminar Series, explored Europe’s ageing demography. Europe is currently facing unprecedented changes - by 2050 it is predicted that more than a third of the European population will be over 60 years old as a result of rising life expectancies and low birth rates.

These changes pose major economic, budgetary and social challenges. In the EU, age related spending is projected to rise from an annual cost of 25% to 29% of GDP between 2010 and 2060. At the same time, there are set to be far fewer people of working age to support European ageing populations- by 2060 the dependency ratio is predicted to drop to under two working-age people for every person aged over 65.

At this event we aimed to inform further this critical debate by launching our first ‘European Factpack’ of demographic statistics. This Factpack provided statistics on a range of topics from life expectancy to housing supply, and pensions to the use of new technologies amongst today’s older generations. The ‘European Factpack’ builds on our UK Factpack initiative, by providing the public, private and third sectors with the most up-to-date information on Europe’s changing demography.

During the discussion we explored:

  • What are the ramifications of Europe’s changing demography, both for individual countries and Europe as a whole?
  • What policy changes will need to be enacted to ensure Europe’s economic sustainability?
  • How the public, private and third sectors react to findings of the ‘European Factpack’?
  • Which areas of the Factpack might be expanded to help policy-makers, journalists and opinion formers?
     

This event was chaired by Lawrence Churchill, ILC-UK Trustee. Confirmed speakers inlcuded: Fritz von Nordheim (European Commission), Jean Lambert (MEP), Maciej Kucharczyk (Age Platform Europe), Andrew Rear (Munich Re), Maureen O'Neill (European Economic and Social Committee) and Richard Willets (Partnership).

Slides from the event are available below:

The slides presented by Fritz Von Nordheim are available here.

 

Fritz Von Nordheim ILC-UK 5 Nov 2014

 

 

International

Wednesday 29th October 2014; 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) – 16.00; Local Government House, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ

We were delighted to hold the ILC Global Alliance Robert Butler Memorial Lecture at the Local Government Association on the afternoon of 29 October 2014.

This event took place as part of the ILC Global Alliance visit to the UK.

Robert Butler, founder of ILC US, was a passionate believer in the importance of health and productive ageing and we were honoured that Dr Ros Altmann, government’s Business Champion for Older Workers agreed to give the Lecture this year.

The Lecture also provided an opportunity to meet and chat with the members of the ILC Global Alliance.

Baroness Sally Greengross

Dr Altmann's presentation slides can be viewed below:

International

Wednesday 29th October 2014; 08.30 (for a 09.00 start) – 12.00; Local Government House, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ

This event was a half day symposium which showcased international research by ILC Global Alliance members on frailty and mobility in old age.

This event took place as part of the ILC Global Alliance visit to the UK.

Speakers at the event included:

Rosy Pereyra – ILC-Dominican Republic: Sarcopenia: A forgotten cause of mobility problems in old age
Susana Concordo Harding – ILC-Singapore: Are we living longer and healthier? Exploring gender differences in health expectancy among older Singaporeans 
Sebastiana Kalula – ILC-South Africa: Prevalence and risks factors for falls, and the impact on mobility in later life: The Cape Town study
Didier Halimi – ILC-France: MOBILAGE: how to maintain frail people mobility? An ongoing experiment at Broca Hospital in Paris.
Kunio Mizuta – ILC-Japan: Long-term care prevention in Japan: To maintain older people’s mobility
Lia Daichman – ILC-Argentina: Loss of mobility, loss of Autonomy, loss of quality of life
Iva Holmerová – ILC-Czech Republic: Local and national initiatives to support active ageing and improve quality of long-term care in the Czech Republic.

Panel members at the event included: Marieke van der Waal – ILC-Netherlands; Jayant Umranikar – ILC-India

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below.

Communities and Housing,Dementia

Tuesday, 28th October 2014; 09:30 - 12:30; London Fire Brigade Headquarters, 169 Union Street, London, SE1 0LL

Electrical Safety First, in collaboration with ILC-UK, were delighted to hold an evidence session into ‘Electrical Safety in an Ageing Society’, which was hosted at the London Fire Brigade Headquarters.

The event was chaired by Sue Adams OBE, Chief Executive of Care and Repair England, and also included speakers from local government, industry and the charity sector. Our audience heard from expert witnesses with a specific focus on housing and dementia, with an opportunity for a Q&A with the panel.

Topics covered by evidence givers included: the current condition of housing for older people in England; future trends in the housing profiles of older people; the role of assistive technology in creating a safer environment for people with dementia; and the advantages of enabling people with dementia to remain in their own homes for longer. This evidence session will be used to help form a report reviewing the current evidence base, and setting out a blueprint for future work in this area by providing recommendations for key policy makers.

Electrical Safety First is the UK charity dedicated to reducing deaths and injuries caused by electrical accidents. They are recognised by government and industry as the leading campaigning charity and technical authority on electrical safety.

If you would like more information about the inquiry, on either the topic of dementia and electrical safety or housing and electrical safety, please contact George Holley-Moore at georgeholley-moore@ilcuk.org.uk.

Transport

Tuesday 28th October 2014; M&G Group, Laurence Pountney Hill, London, EC4R 0HH; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 12:30

We were delighted to hold a half day event where we considered future innovations in transport and transport policy in the context of an ageing society.

This event was sponsored by Age UK, hosted by Prudential, and was part of the ILC Global Alliance visit to the UK. It featured contributions on innovation and policy from across the world.

Speakers at the event included: Christian Wolmar, Ian Pearson, Ruth Finkelstein, Geoff Green, and Sir Alan Greengross.

The presentation slides from the event are available below.

28Oct14 - ILC-UK - The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society

Longevity,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Important notice: This event is now postponed. 

We will be notifying people as soon as this event has been rescheduled 

ILC-UK are launching a new policy report on social connections and wellbeing in older age at The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) Boardroom, 11 Tufton Street, London, on Thursday 16th October, 15:30 (for a 16:00 start) – 18:00. This project is a collaboration between UCL and ILC-UK, and was kindly funded by ESRC.

This important report will highlight the key findings of new research, undertaken by Professor Andrew Steptoe, Dr Snorri Rafnsson and Dr Aparna Shankar, identifying the aspects of social connections which are most relevant to well-being in older adults. The research aims to answer a series of questions including:

  • Which aspects of social connections are associated with life satisfaction, quality of life and positive affect in older adults?
  • How does well-being change over time amongst older adults?
  • How does the experience of different caregiving transitions vary with socioeconomic circumstances, health and relationship status?
  • What is the longitudinal impact of caregiving transitions on positive and negative emotional wellbeing in later life?

The report will then link the findings to current policy to make a series of recommendations.

As loneliness and isolation shoot up the public agenda as a priority, this research will add a new dimension to the debate currently being played out in Government and the media. The event will include presentations from the researchers, and responses from a panel of experts, before the debate is opened up to the floor for questions. This will be followed by a wine reception.

 

Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Sunday 21st September 2014; Green Room, Bridgewater Hall, Lower Mosley St, Manchester, M2 3WS (Outside the secure zone); 18:30 (for 19:00) to 21:00
Exclusive Invitation Only dinner debate

ILC-UK and the University of Manchester, supported by the British Society of Gerontology

 

A private dinner debate in Manchester during the Labour Party Conference 2014. During the debate we considered how we can maximise the economic benefits of extending working lives whilst minimising the social challenges.

In June, the Government set out a new action plan to help older workers stay in the workplace. The ‘Fuller Working Lives’ framework for action sets out a series of proposals to support extending working lives. It announced the appointment of a new Business Champion for Older Workers.

Encouraging and supporting people to stay on in work longer is likely to be vital to future economic success. Older workers will play a significant role in addressing skills gaps and increasing the average age of retirement is likely to deliver positive results in terms of retirement income.

According to Office for National Statistics estimates, in the next 10 years there will be 700,000 fewer people aged 16 to 49 but 3.7 million more people aged between 50 and State Pension age – a fundamental shift in the age distribution of the UK workforce which industry cannot ignore.

While the UK employment rate for 55 to 64 year olds is around 60% and growing, the recent improvement has been relatively modest compared to many other nations, and several countries achieve employment rates of around 70% or above – so there is significant room for improvement.

During this debate we explored what more can be done to extend working lives and how we can manage the social challenges.

This was an exclusive invitation only dinner debate.

Communities and Housing,Equality and Human Rights,Health,Pensions,Work and Retirement

ILC-UK are currently planning our activities at the 2014 Political Party Conferences. We hope to run a series of events on topics as diverse as pensions, health, employment, care and communities as part of the main party conference fringe programme.

If you are interested in talking to us about sponsoring a fringe event, please do get in touch with David Sinclair or Jessica Watson (jessicawatson@ilcuk.org.uk / davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk / 0207 340 0440).

We are also planning our 2014-2015 events programme. We organise 30+ events a year, from small discussion events, through to larger conferences. Our events always “sell out”, and often, very quickly. If you are interested in talking to us about sponsoring an event, please get in touch with David Sinclair or Lyndsey Mitchell at ILC-UK (events@ilcuk.org.uk / 0207 340 0440).

The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

SOS 2020 Health

Wednesday 23rd July 2014; Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 14:30 (for a 15:00 start) – 17:30

We held an event to launch SOS 2020, supported by Aviva and Ernst and Young. This event was kindly sponsored by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (IFoA).

Last week the OBR Fiscal Sustainability Report noted that "public finances are likely to come under pressure over the longer term, primarily as the result of an ageing population. Under our definition of unchanged policy, the Government would end up having to spend more as a share of national income on age-related items such as pensions and health care, but the same demographic trends would leave government revenues roughly stable."

But whilst there is greater awareness of the fiscal challenges of ageing, there has been little progress in addressing an overarching plan to address the challenges. ILC-UK is launching SOS 2020 to begin to identify costed solutions to the fiscal challenges of ageing.

The House of Lords Select Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change, in its 2013 report “Ready for Ageing”, began by saying “the UK population is ageing rapidly, but we have concluded that the Government and our society are woefully underprepared.”

SOS 2020 is a major new programme of work led by ILC-UK which will raise awareness of the need to adapt our economy and society to the big strategic challenges posed by an ageing population.

SOS 2020 will outline the specific policy measures needed to achieve this goal. It will illuminate the issues that face us and develop fully considered and costed solutions that will act as a “call to action” to policy-makers and politicians. Above all SOS 2020 aims to raise national and international awareness of problems and possible solutions in which we all have a vested interest.

In an increasingly interdependent world, there is a need to look beyond national shores for arguably collective consensus and joint solutions. SOS 2020 will give us the opportunity to do this.

ILC-UK launched SOS 2020 with specific projects exploring retirement income sustainability and healthcare sustainability.

This launch event gave delegates an opportunity to feed in their thoughts on how to ensure our public policy maximises the opportunities of our ageing society.

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Future of Age,Intergenerational,Longevity

Thursday 17th July; LG001 – Auditorium, Cass Business School, 106 Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8TZ; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) – 18:30

Throughout 2014, ILC-UK, supported by specialist insurance company, Partnership Assurance Group plc, is undertaking a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

The fourth event in this 'Population Patterns Seminar Series' considered the findings of our ‘Factpack’ of UK demographic statistics.

We all know that people are living longer but how is that likely to change our society? How will pensions be affected? How will we care for our growing older society when the traditional “working age” population is shrinking?

These types of debates are increasingly being played out in the media and in political circles but in order for such debates to be productive, they have to be well informed.

ILC-UK believes its 2014 ‘Factpack’ will support this process by highlighting the most recent evidence of our rapidly ageing society. Not only does it provide statistics on a range of critical topics from life expectancy to housing supply; and pensions to long-term care, it also includes a special focus on the current and potential future state of pensioner poverty.

The event was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK) with a welcome from Steve Haberman (Dean of the Cass Business School). We were delighted that Gregg McClymont MP, Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions), spoke at at the launch event. We also heard presentations from Professor Les Mayhew (Professor of Statistics, Cass Business School), Steve Groves (Chief Executive of Partnership), Ben Franklin (Research Fellow at ILC-UK) and a response from Tom Younger of the Department for Work and Pensions.

During the discussion we explored:

  • How the UK’s demography has changed since the release of the 2013 Factpack and how it might change in the future,
  • How demographic change is reshaping our society,
  • The challenge of pensioner poverty,
  • Regional variations in the experiences of older people,
  • How policy makers should respond to these findings.

Agenda
16:00 - 16:30 Registration
16:30 - 16:35 Welcome by Chair, Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK)
16:35 - 16:40 Welcome by the Dean of Cass Business School, Professor Stete Habberman
16:40 - 16:50 Presentation from Richard Willets (Partnership)
16:50 - 17:10 Presentation from Gregg McClymont MP (Shadow Minister for Work and Pensions)
17:10 - 17:20 Presentation from Ben Franklin (ILC-UK)
17:20 - 17:30 Presentation from Professor Les Mayhew (Cass Business School)
Presentation
17:30 - 17:35 Response from Tom Younger (Department for Work and Pensions)
17:35 - 18:25 Discussion/Q&A
18:25 - 18:30 Close by Chair, Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK)
18:30 - 19:15 Drinks reception


Presentation slides from the event are available to view here:

Work and Retirement

Monday 14 July 2014; Conference Rooms 1, 2 and 3, Legal & General Group Plc, One Coleman Street, London, EC2R 5AA; 14:30 (for a 15:00 start) - 17:00

In June this year, Steve Webb MP, Minister for Pensions set out a new action plan to help older workers stay in the workplace. Launched on 13 June, the ‘Fuller Working Lives’ framework for action details the Government’s new measures to support the economy, workers and businesses, including the appointment of a new Business Champion for Older Workers.

This was an ILC-UK joint event with DWP, and hosted by Legal & General, where Steve Webb MP, Minister for Pensions introduced the new Champion. This was followed by responses from a number of expert panellists who led a debate on the issues affecting an ageing workforce and highlighting priorities for the new Champion to take forward.

According to Office for National Statistics estimates, in the next 10 years there will be 700,000 fewer people aged 16 to 49 but 3.7 million more people aged between 50 and State Pension age – a fundamental shift in the age distribution of the UK workforce which industry cannot ignore.

While the UK employment rate for 55 to 64 year olds is around 60% and growing, the recent improvement has been relatively modest compared to many other nations, and several countries achieve employment rates of around 70% or above – so there is significant room for improvement.

For more details on the framework, please visit https://www.gov.uk/government/news/helping-business-to-wake-up-to-older-workers-untapped-potential

Dementia

Monday 14th July 2014; RSM, One Wimpole Street, London, W1G 0AE, 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) - 17:00

On behalf of the International Longevity Centre–UK, Alzheimer’s Research UK and Improving Care, we invited experts from the field of public health and dementia to discuss the growing interest in dementia risk reduction and the implications of a new paper launched at the event entitled 'Preventing dementia: a provocation. How can we do more to prevent dementia, save lives and reduce avoidable costs?'

Building on the momentum of the Blackfriars Consensus from Public Health England and the UK Health Forum on “promoting brain health and reducing risks for dementia in the population”, we are keen to stimulate debate and discussion about how we could tackle dementia risk factors at scale and the potential economic, health and societal benefits of dementia risk reduction.

The provocation to be launched on the day posits that we can have a significant impact on reducing the number of people who will develop dementia. The paper identifies a number of risk factors for dementia that are amenable to intervention and have modelled the impact of matching the best-practice interventions on reducing the six main risk factors from global case studies. It is estimated that over the 27-year period from 2013-2040 this could prevent nearly 3 million people developing dementia in the UK. This would reduce the costs to the state in the UK by £42.9 billion (calculated from 2013 and 2040, minus any associated costs of intervention).

We see this paper as a provocation and a starting point for more detailed and rigorous research in this field, and are keen to hear views on further research gaps in this area and other research and policy analysis being carried out.

Speakers included Rebecca Wood (Alzheimer's Research UK), Sally-Marie Bamford (ILC-UK), Phil Hope (Improving Care), Keiran Brett (Improving Care), Shirley Cramer (The Royal Society for Public Health), Dr Charles Alessi (Public Health England), Johan Vos (Alzheimer's Disease International).

#DEMENTIAandPREVENTION

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Monday 16th June 2014; M&G, Governor’s House, Laurence Pountney Hill, London, EC4R 0HH; 13:30 (for a 14:00 start) – 16:00

Speaking in the 2014 Budget, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne MP announced plans to “legislate to remove all remaining tax restrictions on how pensioners have access to their pension pots”. He said that “Pensioners will have complete freedom to draw down as much or as little of their pension pot as they want, anytime they want. No caps. No drawdown limits”.

The economic environment, combined with the reforms to the retirement income market, will significantly impact consumer behaviour at the point of retirement. On the one hand, in the prevailing low interest rate environment, consumers will be more susceptible to taking large risks by searching for higher yielding investments.

Alternatively it may be the case that the reforms will allow individuals to better adapt to current and anticipated economic circumstances but this will clearly require skilled financial advice. Where does this come from and who pays for it?

In the Chancellor’s Budget Statement he stated plans to “introduce a new guarantee, enforced by law, that everyone who retires on these defined contribution pensions will be offered free, impartial, face-to-face advice on how to get the most from the choices they will now have.” Since the Budget, “advice” has become “guidance”, but the commitment to a better informed consumer remains.

Over the next year, ILC-UK plan to undertake a range of activities to explore the impact of the changes announced by the Chancellor. Through research and a series of events, we will explore the risks inherent in the announcement made and highlight the opportunities. We will explore and model potential future scenarios and look to seek solutions which mitigate risks to the consumer whilst maximising the opportunities.

ILC-UK began our work in this area by launching, with the support of Prudential, a discussion paper, Freedom and choice in pensions: risks and opportunities, which outlined the Government’s proposals to reform the market and highlight the types of choices that people will face and the support that might be available. Our analysis considered the possible implications of the reforms by looking at the take up of different products across different countries (including US, Denmark and Australia). We also incorporated a discussion of the vast array of literature on the so called “annuities puzzle” – the puzzle of why people fail to annuitise even if it represents the best option.

Our paper considered how people currently use the lump sum option in the UK and how this differs by socioeconomic characteristics. Such analysis of how people use the lump sum could act as a rough proxy for how they will react under the proposed reforms, though the reality may prove different. Our paper also highlighted how we think people could react in the face of the new reforms and make some recommendations about what policy measures need to be developed to address the downside risks.

At this event, chaired by Josephine Cumbo (FT), Ben Franklin (ILC-UK Research Fellow), summarised the planned reforms and set out the findings of our discussion paper. Dean Mirfin (Key Retirement Solutions), Tim Fassam (Prudential), Andew Tully (MGM Advantage) and Tom Boardman (NEST) gave short perspectives on challenges and opportunities. Following a discussion,  Jane Vass (Age UK) and Michelle Cracknell (TPAS) concluded the event with their perspective on the debate.

The debate provided an opportunity to discuss industry and consumer responses to the HM Treasury consultation on freedom and choice in pensions.

During the debate, the critical questions we wanted to address were:

  • How might the Government’s reforms impact peoples’ behaviours at the point of retirement?
  • What sorts of risks and opportunities for consumers will this present?
  • What might this mean for the retirement income market?

Continue the discussion on Twitter - #risksandopportunities

The presentation slides from the event can be viewed below:

Communities and Housing,Pensions,Quality of Life

Thursday 12th June; Committee Room G, House of Lords, Westminster, London; 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 11:00
Coffee and light refreshments will be served from 08:30.

Entry to Committee Room G is through the Cromwell Green (Visitor) Entrance. As queues and waiting times at this entrance can be unpredictable, we recommend that you arrive at the House of Lords as close to 08:00 as possible.

Many older people have equity tied up in their homes that could be used to provide them with a greater income in later life and improve their standard of living. Traditionally, the ways to unlock the equity in people’s homes have been through downsizing, equity release lifetime loans or home reversion plans. However, not everyone is in a position to downsize, there are pros and cons to each approach, and all have associated costs.

The Equity Bank would provide a new way for people to unlock the equity in their home. It would be a state agency which provides people with a low cost fixed lifetime income in exchange for a fixed share of the equity in their home. The Equity Bank would take a charge on the person’s home and recover the value of the equity from the person’s estate after their death.

The event was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK. Nick Kirwan, Director of the ILC-UK Care Funding Advice Network, opened the discussion. Professor Les Mayhew of Cass Business School and co-author of the paper 'The UK Equity Bank - Towards income security in old age' thened present the concept, after which Paul Burstow MP responded.  There was then time for questions and a general discussion.
 

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Health

Dear Colleague,

The ILC-UK has launched a Commission seeking to address the significant and growing problem of hearing loss in the UK. Six million people in the UK experience hearing loss at a level where they would benefit from wearing a hearing aid and this is set to increase to 10 million by 2037.

This is an independent commission, with the ILC-UK providing the governance and secretariat while the Commissioners, drawn from a wide range of different sectors, will drive the agenda and findings. As part of this high level Commission, we are delighted to invite you to attend two evidence sessions at the House of Lords on the following themes:


Thursday 5th June, 14:00 – 16:00 House of Lords
1. How can we ensure that hearing loss is detected early? Many individuals live for years without either realising that they have hearing loss or because they do not seek support. We welcome submissions around the following questions:

  • How can we de-stigmatise hearing loss?
  • Whether and to what extent it is possible to improve the referral process?
  • Are there alternative models to support early detection?
  • How can technology improve early detection?


Tuesday 17th June, 15:30 – 17:30 House of Lords
2. How can we deliver better solutions to reduce the adverse impacts of hearing loss? Early detection is only one part of the jigsaw, we must also propose solutions to reduce the wide-ranging effects of hearing loss. We welcome submissions on the following questions:

  • How do we ensure wider take-up of hearing aids?
  • What forms of service delivery models are needed to meet the needs of a growing hearing impaired population?
  • How do we remove barriers to employment for the hearing impaired?
  • How do we improve health and social care for those suffering with hearing loss?
  • How do we raise public awareness about, and sensitivity to, hearing loss?


During the two sessions Commissioners will have the chance to discuss these issues with expert witnesses but there will also be the opportunity for questions from the audience. We hope that the Commission will play an important part in addressing the significant and growing problem of hearing loss in the UK and that you too can play a part. The briefing note below provides more details about the workings of the Commission and details about the Commissioners.

If you would like to attend please contact us on events@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440. Please note that places are limited and you will need a special pass to proceed through House of Lords security on the day so do get in touch if you would like to come along, specifying which evidence session you would like attend. If you have any special requirements, please let us know.  

Kind regards
Sally Greengross
Chair of the Commission on Hearing Loss and Chief Executive of ILC-UK

The Commission on Hearing Loss: Background Briefing Note

15th May 2014, 13:30 for 14:00 – 16:00, Room LG.08, New Academic Building, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London, WC2A 2AE

Dementia – considered one of the leading challenges for the country as the population ages – has been flagged as a high priority for government, the NHS and local councils. Evidence suggests that there are currently 670,000 people with dementia in England, with annual costs of £23 billion with the contribution of family carers being valued at £8 billion.

In December, the G8 countries held a Dementia Summit in London. The joint declaration from the eight Health Ministers included a commitment “to improve the quality of life for people with dementia and their carers while reducing emotional and financial burden.”

This event launched a new collaborative study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and the National Institute for Health Research.

MODEM - Comprehensive approach to modelling outcome and cost impacts of interventions for dementia - will develop a comprehensive set of quantitative models to forecast how many people will develop dementia in England over the next 30 years; the unpaid support services available from family and other carers; and the projected costs of their treatment and care. It will be carried out in collaboration with researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Newcastle University, the University of Southampton, University of Sussex and the International Longevity Centre-UK. It is one of six dementia projects being funded under a major new ESRC/NIHR programme.

There was an opportunity for discussion and debate, with a panel session discussing their visions for dementia care and support in 2040 – and how we get there. Audience members were also encouraged to contribute their visions for 2040 through participating in the open discussion.

This event was free to attend.

Presentation slides from the event are available to view at http://www.pssru.ac.uk/documents/modem-launch-slides.pdf. The video from the day will be available shortly (subject to there being no technical difficulties).

Communities and Housing

ILC-UK and Age UK are holding a series of research and policy seminars which will explore how our communities need to adapt to an ageing society.  The series will focus on action needed by policymakers today to meet the future challenges and maximise the opportunities our ageing society presents. All three of the discussion seminars will explore issues related to the broader research and policy discussions on age friendly communities.

‘Getting out and about’
Tuesday 11 March 2014, 14.00 – 17.30
This seminar focusses on issues of transport, the built and social environments including crime and their impact on getting older in local communities.  

‘At home’
Thursday 27 March 2014, 14.00 – 17.30
This seminar focusses on the current evidence as to how our home is currently influencing our ability to engage in the community, including the role for housing design and planning, care in the community and assistive technologies to support this.  

'Ensuring communities offer what older people want’
Thursday 10 April 2014, 14.00 – 17.30
This seminar focusses on the activities and interests of older people that need to be represented in our communities to ensure good quality of life and wellbeing for an ageing population.

Following the seminars, ILC-UK will organise a major event in early May to present the findings of the project for over 100 researchers, policymakers, journalists and opinion-formers.

If you would like to attend any of these events, please email events@ilcuk.org.uk including the title of the event in your message. Please also let us know if know if you are involved in any research we should incorporate into our series.

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Transport

Thursday, 8 May 2014 from 09:15 for 09:45 to 15:30

Emmerson/Shears Conference Room
Arup
8 Fitzroy Street
London W1T 4BQ

As the population ages, an increasing number of people will be growing older and continuing to live in communities around the country. Many of our communities are ill-prepared for both the varying needs of older people ageing in place and the future increase in numbers of older people who will need appropriate housing, transport and services. The local elections in May also bring these issues into focus for elected representatives who will be seeking to prepare their areas for these challenges and give the best opportunities for good ageing to their constituents.

At this event we heard results of a series of three solutions-focussed policy discussions held by ILC-UK and Age UK. These discussions have looked at three distinct aspects of communities – from living at home, to getting out and about and the activities and amenities available (or missing) in our communities. We will be discussing a forthcoming report summarising the fresh thinking and practical suggestions for policy makers, local government and community groups gathered from these sessions.

The conference also included sessions on research and information on this topic, and what needs to be done to take action in our communities. All sessions will feature opportunities for attendees to participate in the discussion and add their views on where priorities for action should be focussed.


Agenda from the event:

Welcome - Malcolm Dean (Chair)
Welcome - Caroline Abrahams; Charity Director, Age UK
Scene Setting - Are we ready for ageing? - Baroness Tyler; Member of Lords Committee on Public Services and Demographic Change
Questions
Community Matters – are our communities ready for ageing? - Jessica Watson; Policy and Communications Manager, ILC-UK
Open Discussion

Refreshement Break

Improving Later Life - Susan Davidson; Research Adviser, Age UK
Community Matters : are our communities ready for ageing? - Professor Sheila Peace; Professor of Gerontology, Open University and President Elect of the British Society of Gerontology
Open Discussion

Lunch

Welcome back - David Sinclair; Assistant Director Policy and Communications, ILC-UK (Chair)
Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness. The tale of two cities. - Tracey Robbins; Programme Manager, Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness, JRF
Wellbeing and Interdependence through Assisted Living - Pam Turpin; Senior Research Analyst, Arup
Taking action– in the voluntary sector - Lynne Berry; Commission on Voluntary Sector and Ageing
Taking action – involving older people - Dr Alan Burnett; Chair, Portsmouth Pensioners Association
Open Discussion - what should be the priorities for action?
Taking action – the Centre for Ageing Better - Cheryl Coppell; Chief Executive, Havering Council / Centre for Ageing Better
Questions

Close
 

The presentation slides from the event can be viewed below:

Friday, 2nd May 2014; 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) - 11:00; The Dome, New Register House, 3 West Register Street, EDINBURGH, EH1 3YT

During 2014, ILC-UK, supported by the specialist insurance company, Partnership Assurance Group plc, is undertaking a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

The third event in the series explored the demographic implications of Scottish independence.

In 2014, Scotland will vote in an independence referendum which could significantly change its relationship with the rest of the United Kingdom. An independent Scotland would have a fully independent NHS, control a significant proportion of the North Sea oil reserves and will take on a percentage of the UK national debt.

An independent Scotland would also result in the UK having a new demographic makeup. There are currently a number of marked differences between the two countries which will be highlighted by the division. These include a 2.8 year gap in healthy life expectancy for men, as well as differences in overall life expectancy and mortality rates. Recent figures released by the ONS suggest that the future health of an independent Scotland may actually align with that of the UK. The number of children aged two to 15 either overweight or obese in Scotland is now equal to that of England (30%), and lower than Wales (36%), and Scottish men are significantly more active than their counterparts in both countries.

The seminar explored these differences, as well as how the demography of an independent Scotland may change over time, and what future Scottish Governments (with or without independence) may need to do to adapt to these demographic changes.

Scottish independence would have a number of age-related policy implications for both Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom. The issue of Scotland’s ageing population has already entered political debate, with the SNP announcing that, if elected, they would make new pensioners £4.40 a month better off than in England, while also pledging to set up a commission looking at the state pension age. The Scottish government has also announced that benefits, tax credits and state pensions would continue to be paid from the first day of independence, but have not addressed how they will meet the challenge of moving schemes from one administration to another.

During the discussion we explored:

  • How is the demography of Scotland different to that of England?
  • What would the demography of an independent Scotland look like and how might it change over time?
  • What are the policy implications for Scotland and for the rest of the United Kingdom of a different demographic composition?
  • How might potentially different policy on issues such as migration impact Scotland’s demography?
  • What will the Scottish Government need to do to adapt to demographic change?

Speakers at this event included Tim Ellis (Chief Executive, National Records of Scotland), David Sinclair (Assistant DIrector, Policy and Communications, ILC-UK), Richard Willetts (Director of Longevity, Partnership), Professor David Bell (Professor of Economics, University of Stirling), Kirsty MacLachlan (Head of Demography, National Records of Scotland) and Professor Carol Jagger (AXA Prof of Epidemiology of Ageing, Newcastle University).

The presentation slides from the event are availalbe to view below:

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Quality of Life

Thursday, 10th April 2014, 13:30 (for 14:00) – 17:00, London

This was the third seminar in a series of three exploring ‘Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing?’ from ILC-UK and Age UK.

The topic was ‘Ensuring communities offer what older people want’, and focussed on the activities and interests of older people that need to be represented in our communities to ensure good quality of life and wellbeing for an ageing population. The results of these seminars will inform a solutions-focussed policy brief, looking at what needs to be done to create age-ready local areas. This brief will be launched in May at a full day conference on ageing in our communities.

In this seminar we considered what communities provide for older people and how these needs may change (or stay the same) as they age. We know from research on isolation and loneliness that social connections remain an important part of quality of life for many people as they get older, yet as the ‘loneliness epidemic’ continues to hit headlines it is clear that this is not being fully addressed in communities. Exploring how activities and services can maintain and build on social networks is key to maintaining wellbeing within the community.

Elsewhere, we explored the services, amenities and activities available to older people in their communities – from village shops, to post offices, to libraries and adult education classes, and how these enhance wellbeing for older people. A community can take many forms, and in this session we will also be considering the approaches to be taken from different kinds of setting – from urban to rural – and the challenges that lie in providing services to these distinct regions.

This seminar explored:

  • How family connections, friendships and social ties can be supported and better integrated into community activities.
  • What role do local services and shops play in building a community, what the future of these services looks like and what can be done to ensure they support ageing in the community?
  • What activities are currently available for older people in their communities, and are these suitable or prepared for an increasing number of people accessing them? What else should be available?
  • How we can ensure that fun and playfulness remain part of life when growing older in the community?
  • How can we ensure that the experience of growing older remains at its highest quality across rural, town, suburban, and urban settings?

This was an invite only event.

The presentation slides from the event can be viewed below:


More information on the first seminar in the series can be found here: Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing: Getting out and about

More information on the second seminar in the series can be found here: Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing. At home

Monday 31st March 2014; 10:30 (for 11:00 start) - 14:00; Age International, Tavis House, 1-6 Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9NA

Global ageing is calling into question the differences between developed and developing countries.

Developing countries are seeing a growth of non-communicable diseases usually associated with affluence in wealthier countries: obesity; diabetes; cancer; heart disease; dementia; among others.

Urbanisation is posing significant challenges and opportunities, but countries like China are also seeing vast areas of rural hinterland with an increasingly ageing population.

At the same time, a complex picture of wealth and financial satisfaction is emerging across the world. The global economy is more heavily interlinked than ever before with the future economic success of the UK and wealthier countries likely to rely on the success of development in lower and middle income countries. There is a very positive story to tell about wellbeing in developing countries which is rarely heard.

Across the world, transitions are varying in pace, but a common factor facing most parts is ageing.

Focussing on ageing makes good development sense, a fact that policymakers are increasingly recognising. There has been growing interest from academics and policy makers in exploring how to best compare the impact of ageing in a global context.

HelpAge International's Global AgeWatch Index ranks countries by how well their ageing populations are faring.

The EC and UN supported Active Ageing Index (AAI) is an analytical tool that aims to help policy makers produce policies for active and healthy ageing.

The Global Aging Preparedness Index (GAP) was developed by the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ with financial support from Prudential plc. The GAP Index seeks to inform the policy debate about global aging and focus attention on the need for constructive reform.

Following introductory remarks from Chris Roles of Age International, Jessica Watson of ILC-UK presented new work using a major international dataset – the World Values Survey – about levels of self-reported financial satisfaction. Analysing data from 56 countries over six continents, these findings throw new light on levels of financial satisfaction within and between countries. This analysis has been made possible by the ESRC SDAI initiative.

Rodd Bond of the Netwell Centre in Dundalk discussed the need for a new capability approach to wellbeing across the world.

During the debate we will consider:

  • What is the relevance of ageing to the broader international development agenda?
  • How should we measure wellbeing in old age across the world?
  • What does financial satisfaction mean in the developing world?
  • What is the significance of financial wellbeing in a global context?
  • What can the UK learn from approaches to wellbeing in later life in the developing world?

This debate will be chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK's Chief Executive.
 

Agenda from the event

Welcome - Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK~
Introduction - Chris Roles, Director, Age International
Presentation - Jessica Watson, Policy and Communications Manager, ILC-UK
Presentation - Jane Scobie, Director of Communications and Advocacy, Helpage International
Presentation - Tim Fassam, Head of Public Affairs, Prudential
Panel Debate - Rodd Bond, Director, Netwell Centre; Dr Jack Watters, Vice President for External Medical Affairs, Pfizer; Ken Bluestone, Policy Adviser, Age International
 

Presentation slides from the event:

Thursday 27th March 2014, 13:30 (for a 14:00 start) – 17:00, London

ILC-UK and Age UK will be holding the second in a series of three seminars exploring ‘Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing?’.

The topic is ‘At home’, and focusses on the current evidence as to how our home is currently influencing our ability to engage in the community. The results of these seminars will inform a solutions-focussed policy brief, looking at what needs to be done to create age-appropriate home environments. This brief will be launched in May at a full day conference on ageing in our communities.

The home environment is a crucial policy topic in the context of an ageing society. Home issues such as barriers to independent living, poor conditions, lack of housing options, and a failure to offer integrated support services – all impact substantially on health and wellbeing - with subsequent repercussions on community engagement.

Many older people wish to remain in their homes for as long as possible and increasingly, this is being made possible through assistive technology and the design principles encapsulated in the concept of Lifetime Homes. That homes are appropriate for older people is of utmost priority as unsuitable dwellings can result in fuel poverty and substantial physical barriers to independence and community engagement.

Housing tenure-type as experienced by older people has become a burning political issue with some commentators labelling older people as ‘bedroom blockers’, hoarding large homes at the expense of young families trying to get a foot on the housing ladder. While these opinions remain controversial it is true that a range of alternative housing options for older people are emerging and growing, such as extra care housing, retirement villages, and some cooperative and co-housing schemes. New retirement schemes are placing greater emphasis on changing ‘lifestyle’ choices and residents influence over housing management and the delivery of support services. Does this go far enough? Is it something we need to encourage?

This seminar will explore:

  • What constitutes a home environment that can promote wellbeing?
  • How are home adaptations currently helping older people remain in their homes and what scope is there for improvement?
  • What type of housing do older people desire and how might this develop in the future?
  • Is government policy on housing type and housing inequality currently working in favour of older people?
  • Have we got the right balance between the focus on the provision of specialised housing that encourages older people to move on and solutions that allow older people to remaining in their existing homes?

More information on the first seminar in the series can be found here: Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing: Getting out and about

More infromation on the third seminar in the series can be found here: Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing: Ensuring communities offer what older people want’

The presentation slides from this seminar can be veiwed below:

Thursday 13th March 2014; 08:30 (for 09:00 start) - 10:30; House of Lords, Westminster, London

An Independent Age and ILC-UK breakfast meeting, supported by members of the Ready for Ageing Alliance*

One year ago, the House of Lords Committee on Public Services and Demographic Change produced a hard-hitting report which argued that the Government and society was “woefully underprepared” for a rapidly ageing population.

On the first anniversary of the ‘Ready for Ageing?’ report, we are in the unenviable position that sees the United Kingdom ranked unlucky number 13 in a global index of the best countries in the world to grow old in. The principal recommendations in the ‘Ready for Ageing?’ report have not yet been properly addressed or acted on.

In his October 2013 speech on ‘The Forgotten Million’, Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt MP, set down a challenge that the UK should in fact aspire to be best country to grow old in, but the question remains: why are our public services so poorly prepared for major demographic change, and what as a society can we do to ensure future generations of older people thrive in later life?

Lord Filkin, Chair of the Committee on Public Services and Demographic Change, hosted a House of Lords breakfast debate looking forward to 2030, a date by which there will be 50% more people aged 65 and over in England and a doubling in the numbers of people aged 85 and over. As a society, we need to prepare for the next 15 years right now and certainly in the next Parliament.

At this event, Independent Age and ILC-UK, supported by members of the Ready for Ageing Alliance, launched '2030 vision: The best - and worst - futures for older people in the UK', which will look to the long term and consider what politicians and policy makers need to now, both in preparation for next year’s General Election, and between 2015 and 2020, to prepare for the long term opportunities and challenges ahead.

During the debate, we invited contributions on the economic and societal implications of population ageing and the major policy decisions all the main parties face to ready the UK and its public services for dramatic population ageing.

It’s clear that our political, social and cultural approach towards old age today is already hopelessly out of date, so this event will provide Parliamentarians and stakeholders from across civil society with an opportunity to mark the first anniversary of the House of Lords’ Committee report on demographic change and look ahead, so as a society we can seize the opportunities presented by an ageing population.

*The Ready for Ageing Alliance is made up of Independent Age, Alzheimer’s UK, Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Carers UK, Age UK, Anchor, Centre for Policy on Ageing and the International Longevity Centre – UK


Presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Future of Age,Quality of Life,Transport

Tuesday 11th March 2014, 13:30 (for a 14:00 start) – 17:00, London

This is the first in a series of three seminars exploring ‘Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing?’ from ILC-UK and Age UK. The topic is ‘Getting out and about’, and focusses on issues of transport and the built and social environments and their impact on getting older in local communities. The results of these seminars will inform a solutions-focussed policy brief, looking at what needs to be done to create age-ready local areas. This brief will be launched in May at a full day conference on ageing in our communities.

Getting out and about is of vital importance if older people are to remain healthy, happy and active members of the communities they live in. Getting outdoors benefits older people socially, by allowing them to visit friends and interact with members of the community, and practically, by allowing them to access local amenities and services. These activities also help older people to become more integrated into their local community. Despite these benefits, research has shown that as older people age they make fewer trips outside of their home.

Many factors contribute to older people not getting ‘out and about’. A lack of access to affordable and accessible transport options can be a significant barrier to social inclusion and independence. Bad or poorly maintained pavements, and a lack of benches or accessible toilets create physical barriers to older people when they want to get out and about. These physical barriers then help to create mental barriers. For example, many older people do not leave their homes because of a fear of falling. Elsewhere, research has found that many older people do not venture out of their homes because of a fear of crime.

This seminar will explore:

  • how the local environment can be adapted to better meet the needs of older people.
  • the different physical and emotional barriers affecting older people’s ability to leave their house and engage with the community, with a focus on three key areas- transport, the local environment and fear of crime.
  • the current transport options available to older people in the UK, and then discuss how to ensure private and public transport facilitates the connection between the home and community.
  • strategies to reduce fear of crime while maintaining older people's natural defences against crime, and the usefulness of planning measures such as Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED).

More information on the second seminar in the series can be found here: Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing. At home

More infromation on the third seminar in the series can be found here: Community Matters: are our communities ready for ageing: Ensuring communities offer what older people want

The presentation slides from this seminar can be veiwed below:

Thursday 6th March 2014; 13:30 (for 14:00) - 17:30; 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

An ILC-UK/PFRC joint conference.

From mortgages to credit cards, savings to debt, balancing the books as you get older remains a challenge. As the fastest growing part of the population, older people are increasingly important to the UK economy. It has been estimated, for example, that people over the age of 65 spend more than £100 billion per year, which accounts for around 15 per cent of all household expenditure.

At the same time, older people are experiencing more pressures on their often limited financial resources (such as the need to pay for care and the rising cost of living) which can reduce their quality of life. It is crucially important, therefore, that policy-makers and practitioners have a good understanding of the different aspects of well-being among older people, in order to inform the design of policies and services that affect their lives.

At this event we heared research findings from the joint programme ‘Financial dimensions of well-being in older age’ from the Personal Finance Research Centre (PFRC) and the International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC-UK), funded by the ESRC as part of the Secondary Data Analysis Initiative. Findings from this research programme thus far have focused on three themes: understanding the ‘older consumer’; understanding older households’ balance sheets; and understanding the financial dimensions of wellbeing in later life.

In the second half of the event, key thought leaders provided their responses to the research findings, and engage in an open debate on what kind of policy and business responses are needed to support older people with their finances.

The event was followed by a drinks reception.

For more information on this joint project, please visit the PFRC website.

We had a small number of funded places in the form of a contribution towards travel costs (receipts required) available for postgraduate students at this event. We offered these places on a first-come, first-served basis.

View the presentation slides below:

Wednesday 5th March 2014; 08:30 (for 09:00 start) – 10:30; House of Lords, Westminster

During 2014, ILC-UK, supported by specialist insurance company, Partnership Assurance Group plc (Partnership), is undertaking a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

The second event in the series explored how much we really know about life expectancy at the highest ages. How many of us are living to 90 and beyond? Why have estimates of life expectancy required revision?  What does this tell us about increasing longevity? And what does this trend mean for public policy and long-term population planning?

The twentieth century saw life expectancy in the UK rise dramatically due to improvements in public health, nutrition and medicine. As a result more people are living into their 90’s than ever before.

However, a recent analysis of the 2011 census for England & Wales revealed that the growth of this age group has actually been slower than predicted. Richard Willets, Director of Longevity at Partnership, has analysed this data to highlight the fact that fewer people are living into their 90s. In fact, the census showed there were around 30,000 fewer people aged 90 and above than previously thought.

The discovery of ‘missing’ members of the oldest generations is not just a UK phenomenon. Similar patterns have been observed elsewhere, most notably in the United States where the 2010 census counted less than half the number of predicted centenarians.

So why is it that the population estimates are coming unstuck at this stage of the lifecourse? What can be done to improve our estimation of population counts and expectation of life at the highest ages?

Population projections and forecasts of life expectancy help shape strategic choices and decisions in many areas of public policy including state and public sector pensions, healthcare, social care, housing and transport. Changing views on the potential for further increases in life expectancy could potentially have ramifications for all of these areas.

During the discussion we explored:

  • How accurate are our predictions for the growth in the number of the oldest old?
  • Have certain drivers that increased life expectancy reached their zenith?
  • What current factors could potentially lead to increases or decreases in life expectancy?
  • What are the policy ramifications?

The write-up from the event is availalbe to view and download here.


Agenda from the event:

08:30 – 09:00
Registration

09:00 – 09:05
Welcome – Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK)

09:05 – 10:25
Presentations from:
Richard Willets (Director of Longevity, Partnership)
Dave Grimshaw FIA (Partner, Barnett Waddingham LLP)
Angele Storey (Demographic Analysis Unit, ONS)
David Sinclair (Assistant Director – Policy and Communications, ILC-UK)
Andrew Latto (Deputy Director, State Pensions Directorate, Department for Work and Pensions)
Followed by discussion and Q&A

10:25 – 10:30
Close – Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK)
 

This was an invitation only event.

View the presentation slides below:

Monday, 10th February, 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) – 18:30, PwC, 1 Embankment Place, London, WC2N 6RH

Debate and report launch. ILC-UK and Age UK, hosted by PwC.

Speaking during the Autumn Statement in December 2013, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne MP, confirmed plans which would mean that people should spend a third of their adult lives in retirement.

The 2013 Draft Pensions Bill, currently going through the House of Lords, proposes five-year reviews of the State Pension Age (SPA) with the aim of maintaining the proportion of adult life spent in receipt of a state pension based on increasing life expectancy.

In the UK, reductions in mortality have been accompanied by increased life expectancies over the last century. Between 1911 to 2010, life expectancy in the UK has increased from 49.4 to 78.5 for men and from 53.1 to 82.4 for women. The Chancellor confirmed that the date when the state pension age rises to 68 will be brought forward to the mid-2030s - it had not been due to kick in until 2046 - and the state pension age could rise to 69 by the late 2040s.

A growing number of countries are beginning to link pension age with increases in life expectancy to address the financial impact of an ageing population. Across the OECD, countries are raising retirement ages as life expectancy increases. By 2050, the average state pension age will rise from 63 for men and 62 for women to almost 65 for both sexes. A number of countries in the European Union have linked pension benefits with life expectancy including Spain, Italy, Czech Republic, Denmark, Greece and the Netherlands.

It has been estimated that, from 2007 to 2032, the public expenditure on pensions and related benefits will rise from 4.7% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to 6.2%.
But whilst increasing the State Pension Age appears to be a logical step to addressing the financial challenges of an ageing population, the complex interplay of factors impacting on retirement and workforce participation cannot be ignored.

Our event considered some of these challenges such as:

  • How can increasing the State Pension Age be fair when significant numbers of poorer citizens will reach this age in ill-health (or not at all)?
  • Which groups lose out most by an increase in state pension age?
  • How can we respond to the fairness challenge?
  • The appropriateness of different measures of life expectancy (cohort life expectancy; period life expectancy; healthy life expectancy; disability free life expectancy).
  • Will increasing the State Pension Age reduce the dependency ratio and extend working lives?
  • What will be the fiscal impact if an increasing number older people find themselves unable to work and needing to access working age benefits?

At the event, heared from the Minister for Pensions, Steve Webb MP on his plans for state pensions.

ILC-UK Research Fellow, Ben Franklin will present a new report, supported by the ILC-UK Age UK Fellowship, which will consider the complex issues.

Dr Craig Berry, ILC-UK Fellow and Research Fellow at the University of Sheffield, will presented research undertaken for the TUC on life expectancy inequalities. He also discussed proposals for an independent commission on state pension age.

Camilla Williamson, Age UK’s Development and Support Manager, Knowledge Transfer, presented new qualitative research on the impact of changes to the State Pension Age on people in routine occupations and their thoughts and feelings on linking it to average life expectancy.

Professor John MacInnes, a social demographer and Professor of Sociology at the University of Edinburgh, presented data on Scottish life expectancy by residence in areas of multiple deprivation.


View the presentation slides from the event below:

Dementia

Monday 3rd February 2014; 19:00 (for 19:20) – 22:30; Cholmondeley Room, House of Lords, Westminster, London

ILC-UK held a dinner discussion, hosting by Baroness Sally Greengross 9ILC-UK Chief Executive) in the House of Lords on the topic of dementia and stigma. This dinner was kindly supported by Alzheimer’s Research UK, Alzheimer’s Society, Medical Research Council and Pfizer, and ILC-UK are very pleased to be collaborating and working with these organisations. Baroness Greengross co-chaired the event with Professor V Hugh Perry, Chair of the Neuroscience and Mental Health Board at the Medical Research Council and Professor of Experimental Neuropathology at the University of Southampton.

Stigma is a huge barrier to diagnosis, treatment and quality of care for dementia, affecting individuals and their families. The World Alzheimer’s Report from 2012 highlights the issue through a global lens, with 75% of people with dementia and 64% of carers surveyed responding that there are negative associations with having dementia in their countries. In the UK we will see numbers of people with dementia rising to 1 million by 2021. These high numbers mean that unless we take action, large numbers of these people will continue to face stigma. Work by the Nuffield Council of Bioethics from 2009 found that a low understanding of dementia-caused behavioural changes by families and the general public can deprive patients of an early diagnosis and further support. While this existing work has drawn attention to the existence of the issue there is still much to understand about why dementia remains outside the realm of acceptable everyday conversation even as the profile of dementia rises. We need to draw together where research is exploring the real causes of this stigma.

The central focus of this dinner discussion was not to revisit the statistics on this stigmatisation, but to try to understand the factors that give rise to stigma of this vulnerable group of individuals. During the evening we heard from speakers from different fields including Peter Piot (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), Julian Hughes (Newcastle University) and Neil Harrison (Brighton and Sussex Medical School). These speakers framed the neuroscience, evolutionary biology, ethical and other issues that lie behind the negative stereotyped responses. This was followed by an opportunity for guests to discuss the issues raised and contribute to the debate where we focused on how we can seek to tackle stigma in light of knowledge and expertise on its origins.

The results of this debate will be written up as a comprehensive summary report by the ILC-UK. This synthesis will aim to shed further light on the reasons why dementia continues to carry the weight of this stigma, and how this situation might be ameliorated. By addressing the basis of stigma, we hope that education and information can become more effective in targeting the causes of negative reactions to dementia and people with dementia and ultimately removing this stigma and discrimination.

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Pensions

Thursday 30th January 2014, 08:30 (for a 09:00 start) – 11:00 in Committee Room G, House of Lords, Westminster, London.

The Financial Services Consumer Panel, (FSCP) recently published a report which argued that the annuity market does not work well for the majority of consumers. The Panel felt that the “complex market” was “failing to deliver good outcomes for many consumers”.

The value of annuities is increasingly being questioned by journalists and opinion formers. Rates are improving but have been relatively low and too few individuals exercise choice or have access to the advice they need. Those in favour of other alternative income options, such as income drawdown, have signalled that it is the end of annuities. Yet, annuities offer significant benefits over other forms of pension income. A guaranteed income for life is considered a better option by some customers.
 
The debate, sponsored by Legal & General, a leading annuity provider, in conjunction with the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) was held in the House of Lords, on Thursday 30 January 2014.

During the event we explored what the industry, government and the regulator needs to do to respond to the FSCP challenges and whether annuities are still fit for purpose. Or does the industry need to innovate in product design and access to flexible solutions that meet future customers’ expectations?

The event, chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross, firstly presented the views of a panel of six leading representatives from across the industry who have an interest in the at retirement market outlining whether they believe that annuities are still fit for purposes and if not, what other options they believe should be considered.

The panel included Sue Lewis, Chair of the Financial Services Consumer Panel; Dan Hyde, Personal Finance Editor of the Daily Telegraph; Tom McPhail, Head of Research at Hargreaves Lansdown and Chair of Pension Income Choice Association (PICA); Ros Altmann, Economist and former Downing Street adviser; Jane Vass, Head of Public Policy at Age UK and Tim Gosden, Head of Strategy for Legal & General’s individual annuity business.

Following the panel presentation the debate was then opened to the invited audience which included parliamentarians and senior representatives from across the industry. Senior representatives of charities, think tanks, government departments, regulators and selected media contacts who regularly write on this subject, were also been invited.


Agenda from the event

08:30 – 09:00
Registration and light refreshments
09:00 – 09:10
Introduction from Kerrigan Procter, Managing Director of Legal & General’s Retirement business and Baroness Sally Greengross
09:10 – 10:10
Presentations by the panel
10:10 – 10:55
Open discussion and Q&A
10:55 – 11:00
Close from Chair


View the slides from the presentations below:

Economics of Age

Tuesday 21st January, 15:45pm to 18:30, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB

ILC-UK and the Institute for Policy Research and Centre for Death and Society at the University of Bath.

How can the public, private and third sectors support the ageing population in managing the costs associated with dying, including the families and communities that people leave behind?

We know that death rates in England and Wales have fallen to their lowest recorded level. Figures published in 2012 revealed that mortality rates were the lowest ever recorded for England and Wales. There were 6,236 deaths per million population for males and 4,458 deaths per million population for females.

Medical advancement has made significant improvements to death rates. Over the last decade, the death rate for circulatory diseases has fallen by 44%. During the same period, death from cancer decreased by 14% for men and 10% for women, and infant mortality has dropped by 60%. As a result people are living longer, which requires larger incomes and pension pots to ensure these extra years can be afforded.

Yet whilst we have seen significant falls in the number of deaths, the cost of dying has steadily increased.  A recent report  revealed that the average cost of dying has risen to £7,622, representing a 7.1% increase on last year.

There are a range of products and services that contribute to this figure, including the funeral, probate, headstones and flowers. On average, the price of a typical funeral including non-discretionary fees and a burial or cremation is £3,456. The average amount spent on extras such as flowers, catering, limousines and a memorial is £2,006.

This annual increase in the cost of dying is not a one off trend. The average cost of a funeral has risen by 80% between 2004 and 2013. The costs of dying are expected to continue to increase, reaching £4,300 within the next 5 years.

Unsurprisingly, the number of people who are struggling to meet these costs is growing. This year, over 100,000 people will struggle to pay for a funeral. With the average shortfall experienced £1,277, it has been estimated that across the country funeral poverty now stands at £131million, over 50% higher than the £85million estimated 3 years ago.

We know that the long term decline in death rates is about to reverse, with a projected rise in the number of deaths around 15-20% in the next two decades. We also know that right now, with some of the lowest death rates ever recorded, the safety nets provided by the State via the Social Fund Funeral Payment and local authority Public Health Funerals are under pressure. Their sustainability into the future is debatable.

Taking all this into account, it is imperative that the public, private and third sectors work together to support the ageing population – and the generations behind them - to prepare for the costs associated with death, both in terms of their own and their family members. The question we wanted to address in this event is how?

Through this event and report we explored:

  • How have the levels of mortality changed over the past century and what are the future trends?
  • How many people might be in funeral poverty?
  • Will we see more people facing funeral poverty in the future?
  • Can the cost of dying be reduced?
  • Can the Social Fund Funeral Payment be rescued?
  • How can the insurance industry support the costs of dying?
  • How should the Government respond to the impending challenges?

Notes of the discussion will be published in a report by ILC-UK and the University of Bath following the event.


Agenda from the event:

15.45 – 16:00
Registration

16:00 – 16:05
Welcome, Baroness Sally Greengross

16:05 – 17:00
Dr Kate Woodthorpe, University of Bath
Ben Franklin, ILC-UK

Debbie Kerslake, Cruse Bereavement Care
Dean Lamble, Sun Life Direct
Elizabeth Procter, Sue Ryder Care


17:00 – 17:40
Discussion and Q&A

17:40 – 17:45
Close, Baroness Sally Greengross

17.45 – 18:30
Wine reception


The slides from the speakers' presentations are available to view below:

Wednesday 4 December, 9.00 (for 9.30) – 11.30, Royal Society of Medicine, 1 Wimpole Street, London, W1G 0AE

Funded by an unrestricted grant from Sanofi Pasteur MSD

The recent public health reforms have now been in action for a few months, with local areas taking advantage of their newfound responsibilities and taking strategic decisions on what their public health focusses should be. Demographic change presents multi-faceted challenges for these decision makers, so how are these new structures responding an ageing society in their public health planning?

At this debate, we explored the extent to which the new public health structures in England are able to respond to an ageing population. The debate covered issues such as how public health spending should be allocated across the life-course. With the current climate of concern around intergenerational fairness, particularly across public spending, how can we ensure that the next steps in public health are fair for all age groups?

During this debate we heard an overview of the public health changes at a nation level, and then a policy perspective from an ILC-UK speaker on some of the challenges facing the new structures in light of an ageing population. This was followed by a series of experts presenting key examples of important aspects of public health for an ageing society, and how these issues are being addressed thus far by the new structures.

Questions addressed in the debate included:

  • How are the new structures responding to the varied public health challenges of an ageing population?
  • What should be their key focuses in order to ameliorate some of the health challenges an older age structure presents?
  • Are the new public health structures focussing spending fairly across different generations?
  • How should public health spending be allocated across the lifecourse?
  • How can we best evaluate, gather and disseminate evidence about what works in public health?


Agenda for the event:

09:00 - 09:30
Registration, including tea & coffee and pastries

09:30 - 09:35
Welcome, Baroness Sally Greengross

09:35 - 11:25
Presentations from Dr Mike Brannan, Public Health England, and Jessica Watson, ILC-UK.

Contributions on case study topics:

Helen Donovan, Royal College of Nursing - Vaccination

Emma Stanmore, University of Manchester - Falls

Kate Jopling, Campaign to End Loneliness - Loneliness

Julia Thrift, Town and Country Planning Association - Housing

Elizabeth Box, RAC Foundation - Road safety

Q&A

11:25 - 11:30
Close, Baroness Sally Greengross

Pensions,Work and Retirement

28th November 2013; 14:30 (for a 15:00 start) – 17:00; ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminster, London, SW1P 3QB

Over the next year, ILC-UK, supported by the specialist insurance company, Partnership Assurance Group plc, plans to undertake a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

We started the series by exploring how proposals to change the way we undertake our Census may impact on our ability to understand our future society.

The Census was first carried out in 1801 - when the official population of Great Britain was revealed for the first time at 9 million.  But current plans may mean significant changes to the future  collection of data. In September 2013, the ONS initiated a three month consultation on the future of the national Census.

The ONS has proposed two options for reform. Either continuing with a Census each decade, but conducted primarily online; or using annual but smaller surveys in conjunction with existing government administrative data. The motivation is partly cost. However,  the ONS has also stressed that any decision needs to be based not on cost, but on how to get the best and most timely information given technological advances.

Census findings are a tool to help governments allocate spending and plan ahead. The smaller annual survey would identify demographic and social trends more quickly but would be less detailed and comprehensive.

The Census has uncovered social phenomena that would otherwise have remained hidden – slum housing, fertility rates and transport among them. For example, the 1971 Census revealed how many people were living without hot running water. These  findings can have a marked impact on policy. Danny Dorling, Professor of Human Geography at Oxford University, said “If you want to highlight the inequalities in a society there is no better way than to ask everybody how many bedrooms they have and how many people live in their house.”

The case for replacing the traditional Census with an annual alternative is based on a number of tenets, one of which is cost. The 2011 Census cost £480m; in 2021, the cost is expected to be £800m if the same, paper-based system were used. Replacing the Census would also allow for more timely data for planners and decision makers and could potentially avoid statistical surprises such as the unexpectedly big population growth uncovered by the 2011 Census.

The debate has fed into an ILC-UK response to the Census consultation.

Throughout this debate and resulting policy brief we explored:

  • How important is the Census to policy makers and industry (including the financial services industry)?
  • Might the loss of some very local data make identifying exclusion more difficult?
  • Might other datasets prove to be better than the Census in helping us understand our population and how it is changing?
  • Are there any unintended consequences of scrapping the Census in its current form?
  • How can we ensure that reforms to the Census do not risk our understanding of demographic change and ageing?

The write-up from the event can be viewed and downloaded here.


AGENDA

14:30 – 15:00
Registration

15:00 – 15:10
Welcome, Norma Cohen (Financial Times)

15:10 – 16:55
Presentations from:
Richard Willets (Director of Longevity, Partnership)
Professor Peter Goldblatt (Deputy Director, Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, UCL Institute of Health Equity)
Professor Heather Joshi (Professor of Economic and Developmental Demography, Emeritus Professor, Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Education University of London)
Phil Rossall (Research Manager, Age UK)
Professor Ludi Simpson (Beyond 2011 Independent Working group, University of Manchester)

Discussion/Q&A

16:55 – 17:00
Close, Norma Cohen (Financial Times)
 

 

The presentation slides from the event can be viewed below:

Health

19th November 2013, 10:00 (10.30) - 12.30 (followed by a light lunch), Royal College of Nursing, 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

At this event hosted by the Royal College of Nursing, ILC-UK launched a new report on adult immunisation. We also presented findings of major new research on adult immunisation across Europe which was published by the SAATI coalition in November 2013. The debate considered the findings of the research and explored how policymakers should respond to the challenges highlighted in the new reports.

According to the WHO, immunisation prevents between 2-3 million deaths a year across all age groups.[1]

Immunisation should be considered as a life course issue. It is generally the oldest and youngest in society who are the worst affected by vaccine preventable diseases. Increasing the uptake of vaccination across the life-course will help prevent the spread of disease to more vulnerable groups.

In an ageing society, it is important that adult immunisation attracts increasing attention from policy makers and health professionals.

  • In the EU, between 40,000 and 220,000 deaths per year can be attributed to influenza infection, depending on the pathogenicity of the circulating viral strain[2]. The highest prevalence occurs among older adults, especially those with chronic medical conditions or immunological disorders, resulting in increased mortality[3].
  • New evidence from Scotland suggests that the majority of cases of invasive pneumococcal infection are in older age groups: 41.1% (127 cases) were aged 65 years and older and 40.5% (125 cases) were aged 35 to 64 years, with just 18.4% (57 cases) being aged 34 and under.”[4]
  • Shingles affects approximately 250,000 adults in the UK every year.[5]

The SAATI (Supporting Active Ageing Through Immunisation) coalition is a voluntary pan-European partnership of individuals who have an interest in improving the health of citizens as they grow older, and reducing the incidence of illness through effective immunisation. In November 2013 they will publish a major research report on adult immunisation across Europe.

Following the research publication in Brussels, ILC-UK will launch a new report on adult immunisation which has been funded through an unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer International Operations. The report will inform UK policy makers to build on the success of childhood immunisation programmes to create a robust programme for adult immunisation. This event provides an opportunity to present and debate the latest research from SAATI and ILC-UK and consider the policy implications.


Agenda
10:00 - 10:30
Registration
10:30 - 10:35
Welcome from Chair
10:35 - 12:25
Presentations from:
Helen Donovan (RCN)
Professor David Taylor (UCL)
Michael Corr (Immunisation Coordinator, Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust)
David Sinclair (ILC-UK)
Q&A/Discussion
12:25 - 12:30
Close from Chair
12:30 - 13:00
Light lunch available

[1]http://www.who.int/immunization/newsroom/events/immunization_week/2012/further_information/en/

[2]European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). The hard facts are often overlooked: Influenza remains a threat.http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/healthtopics/spotlight/spotlight_influenza/key_message_2/pages/full_key_message_2.aspx

[3]Influenza vaccines. Wkly Epidemiol. Rec.80,279–287 (2005). [Medline]

[4] HPS, weekly report 31 August 2011. Available at: http://www.documents.hps.scot.nhs.uk/ewr/pdf2011/1135.pdf

[5] See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8487987.stm

 

View David Sinclair's presentation below:

Transport

13th November 2013, European Parliament

The SAATI launch event (EU Report Card Launch) took place in Brussels on 13 November 2013 in the European Parliament. SAATI were cooperating with Vaccines Europe for the launch and dissemination of the report.

During the launch event, the key findings and recommendations of the report were presented and a Call for Action to develop a strong and comprehensive life-course vaccination strategy to tackle infectious diseases will be launched.

The launch event was hosted by MEP Rebecca Taylor (ALDE, UK).

12h30 - 12h50
Registration and Welcome Lunch
12h50 – 13h00
Welcome, by MEP Rebecca Taylor (ALDE,UK)
13h00 –13h10
Opening Remarks, by Antonios Lanaras, Health Attaché,Greek Permanent Representation to the EU
13h10 – 13h20
Immunisation in Europe: State of Play, by Mr. Martin Seychell, Deputy Director General Health & Consumers, European Commission
13h20 – 13h35
SAATI European Report Card (Key Findings), by Prof Javier Garau, SAATI Chair and former President ESCMID
13h35 – 13h45
The Importance of Vaccination: Parent’s Testimony, by Danny Darche
13h45 – 14h00
Launch of the Call for Action, by Hildrun Sundseth, SAATI Member and Board Member of the European Institute of Women's Health
14h00 – 14h20
Discussion, moderated by MEP Rebecca Taylor (ALDE, UK)
14h20 – 14h30
Closing Remarks, by MEP Petru Luhan (EPP, RO)

For more information on the EU Report Card, please email: info@saati.com

Adult vaccination: A key component of healthy ageing. The benefits of life-­‐course immunisation in Europe. by ILC-UK

Wednesday 6th November 2013, 17:30 - 19:00, Roberts 106, Roberts Building, UCL, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE

In collaboration with CRUCIBLE at UCL
Part of the UCL Festival of Ageing

According to recent ONS figures, the average age at which people retire is rising. In addition, government is keen to promote an extension of working lives due to the fiscal pressures of population ageing. However, working into later life is more complex than simply delaying the official retirement age; influential factors will also cause particular changes as society as a whole grows older.

‘Working Longer in an Ageing Society’ is a panel discussion focussing on the issues of extending working lives. Organised and chaired by the International Longevity Centre (ILC-UK), this event will feature perspectives from UCL academics and representatives from Carers UK to explore some of the salient issues related to working to later ages, with particular awareness of the role that health and wellbeing play.

17:30  Welcome & Opening Remarks
Mr Brian Beach, ILC-UK

17:35  Presentations
Prof Diana Kuh, UCLWork, health and ageing in the baby boom generation: evidence from the MRC 1946 British birth cohort study’
Ms Jenny Head, UCL ‘Determinants of Healthy Life Expectancy and Extending Working Lives’
Ms Katherine Wilson, Carers UK ‘The Intersection of Care and Work in an Ageing Population’

18:20  Questions & Discussion

18:55  Closing Remarks
Mr Brian Beach, ILC-UK

Older Consumers

Tuesday 22 October 2013. 13.30 for 14.00. Brown Forman Beverages, 45 Mortimer Street, London, W1W 8HJ

In an ageing society, understanding and engaging with ‘the older consumer’ is of pressing interest for businesses who want to realise the potential of the market. But it is not an easy market to understand or describe.

A key issue to be addressed by marketers is to avoid a homogenisation of older people. The diversity of consumer spending of this group is often lost in ageist perceptions of ‘what older people want’. Despite this however, it remains to be seen if the commonalities of ageing – such as wealth depletion and physiological changes – nudge older people to gravitate to a norm.

In Dec 2010, ILC-UK and the Personal Finance Resource Centre (PFRC) at the University of Bristol published a report which explored what and how older people spent their income (Consumption Patterns Among Older Consumers). The evidence from this report fed into the ILC-UK report for Age UK on older consumers (The Golden Economy).

ILC-UK and PFRC have teamed up again to further explore issues around consumption and old age, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council Secondary Data Analysis Initiative. At this seminar we presented new evidence which explores patterns of expenditure among older people and considers what explains these.

During the seminar we:

  • Considered how our spending varies as we age, including setting out average and overall spending by age group;
  • Segmented older households based on their patterns of expenditure;
  • Considered the validity of a single ‘older consumer’ model.

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Intergenerational

Tuesday 15th October 2013. 12:30 (for 13:00 start) to 14:30. Atlee Room, House of Lords, Westminster

A formal lunch in the House of Lords during which we explored the role grandparental giving is playing in supporting younger people through University.

Over lunch we discussed new research by ILC-UK, supported by Key Retirement Solutions and Partnership, which set out:

  • What is the wealth of grandparents?
  • How much grandparents are giving to their grandchildren?
  • What proportion of grandparents give money?
  • What makes a grandparent more likely to give?
  • At what age grandparents are most likely to give

With students entering the new academic year contemplating the rising costs of university, we will ask whether today’s generation of pensioners – who arguably have benefited from a unique set of socio-economic circumstances – are doing enough to help? Or are they already doing as much as possible?

The research, being launched by ILC-UK, has been produced through analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a large-scale longitudinal panel survey of people aged 50 and over living in private households in England.

The full report will be available to dowload from the ILC-UK website from Wednesday 16th October 2013.

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Pensions,Work and Retirement

Private Breakfast Debate: Monday 30th September, Manchester (Outside the secure zone), 8:00 (for 8:15) to 9:45

Recent research by ILC-UK for Age UK (Tales of the Tallyman) found that three in ten (28% or 1.1 million), older people in debt were considered to be in “problem debt” and struggling to repay what they owed. Ten per cent of older people with unsecured debt – around 400,000 – were paying over £85 a week to service their debt.

It is widely acknowledged that debt problems seriously impact on people’s quality of life and relationships, but for the first time, this research showed that older people who enter problem debt are over twice as likely to experience marital breakdown as those who do not.

Stepchange, the UK’s leading debt charity, have reported growing concerns about older people in debt, reporting that the over 40s owe four times as much money as those aged under 25.

Following a successful partnership in 2010, ILC-UK and Personal Finance Research Centre PFRC at the University of Bristol have teamed up to work together on consumption and wellbeing in later life.  This work has been funded by the Economic and Social Research Council Secondary Data Analysis Initiative.

At this breakfast debate, PFRC at the University of Bristol will present new evidence on the nature of debt in old age. Stepchange will discuss their experience of debt and the older consumer and ILC-UK will present the findings of Tales of the Tallyman.

Following short presentations of the research, participants will be encouraged to debate policy solutions to tackle the challenges highlighted.

If you are interested in attending this breakfast event, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Equality and Human Rights,Intergenerational

Private Dinner Debate: Sunday 29th September, Manchester (Outside the secure zone), 18:30 (for 19:00) to 21:00
Supported by University of Manchester and the Ready for Ageing Alliance


David Willetts MP’s 2010 book, “the Pinch: How the Baby Boomers Took Their Children’s Future – And Why They Should Give it Back” argued that society is “not attaching sufficient value to the claims of future generations”.

It set out that baby boomers have benefited from a set of unique circumstances, benefitting from, amongst other things, improved healthcare, a growth in housing wealth, relatively generous occupational pensions and free higher education.

Since the publication of the book, policy debates about intergenerational fairness have raged. On the one hand, younger people today face student fees, high costs of housing and high unemployment. Benefits have been cut for younger people and those of working age, whilst older people have retained universal benefits such as the free bus pass and TV licence and a winter fuel allowance.

On the other hand, there are huge inequalities within the older population and significant poverty continues. Older people have found low interest rates erode their savings and quantitative easing has contributed to continued falls in annuity rates.

But how real is the conflict being played out in the media and public policy? At a familial level, financial transfers between generations are common and people of all ages are contributing care across and within generations. When ILC-UK surveyed individuals in 2011 about the national insurance exemption for older workers, we found younger people were more likely than old to defend the policy. Similarly, recent polling for Prudential found younger people more likely to defend pensioner benefits than older people themselves.

At this debate, researchers from the University of Manchester will examine the reality of intergenerational competition for resources. ILC-UK will discuss new research, supported by Key Retirement Solutions and Partnership, on the transfer of wealth from grandparents to grandchildren. Other speakers will present their views on how to prevent the emergence of intergenerational tensions.

During the debate we will explore:

  • What is the evidence of intergenerational conflict?
  • Are older people consuming a disproportionate amount of societal resources?
  • Are divisions within generations more important than those between them?
  • Should there be greater focus on wealth and health disparities within rather than between generations?
  • To what extent is there a transfer of wealth between generations?
  • What can be done to prevent future intergenerational conflict?

If you are interested in attending this dinner debate, please contact Lyndsey Mitchell on events@ilcuk.org.uk. Please note that we have limited availability remaining for this dinner.