EVENTS:

Communities and Housing,Dementia,Quality of Life

Tuesday 27th January 2015; 15:30 – 17:00; House of Lords, London

Eventbrite - Report Launch: Inquiry into Electrical Safety in an Ageing Society

On behalf of the ILC-UK and Electrical Safety First, we invite you to celebrate the launch of our report on the challenges our ageing population poses to electrical safety.

The report is a culmination of extensive research, a ‘call’ for information, an evidence session attended by experts in the fields of housing and dementia, and a high-level review group. This has all helped form this final report, which we will launch on the 27th January 2015.

With the support of Electrical Safety First, we hope the report will highlight the often maligned importance of maintaining high levels of electrical safety, and draw attention to the challenges our ageing population poses to electrical safety. The inquiry has identified two key areas – housing and dementia – which the report will focus on. An increase in the number of older people, both with and without dementia, means that the need to create a home environment which is as safe as possible has never been greater.

We will be inviting a range of guests, some of whom will have taken part in the enquiry but also a wider audience of journalists, politicians and experts in the fields of housing policy and dementia. We do hope you will be able to join us for this very special event.

 

Communities and Housing,Dementia

Tuesday, 28th October 2014; 09:30 - 12:30; London Fire Brigade Headquarters, 169 Union Street, London, SE1 0LL

Electrical Safety First, in collaboration with ILC-UK, were delighted to hold an evidence session into ‘Electrical Safety in an Ageing Society’, which was hosted at the London Fire Brigade Headquarters.

The event was chaired by Sue Adams OBE, Chief Executive of Care and Repair England, and also included speakers from local government, industry and the charity sector. Our audience heard from expert witnesses with a specific focus on housing and dementia, with an opportunity for a Q&A with the panel.

Topics covered by evidence givers included: the current condition of housing for older people in England; future trends in the housing profiles of older people; the role of assistive technology in creating a safer environment for people with dementia; and the advantages of enabling people with dementia to remain in their own homes for longer. This evidence session will be used to help form a report reviewing the current evidence base, and setting out a blueprint for future work in this area by providing recommendations for key policy makers.

Electrical Safety First is the UK charity dedicated to reducing deaths and injuries caused by electrical accidents. They are recognised by government and industry as the leading campaigning charity and technical authority on electrical safety.

If you would like more information about the inquiry, on either the topic of dementia and electrical safety or housing and electrical safety, please contact George Holley-Moore at georgeholley-moore@ilcuk.org.uk.

Dementia

Monday 14th July 2014; RSM, One Wimpole Street, London, W1G 0AE, 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) - 17:00

On behalf of the International Longevity Centre–UK, Alzheimer’s Research UK and Improving Care, we invited experts from the field of public health and dementia to discuss the growing interest in dementia risk reduction and the implications of a new paper launched at the event entitled 'Preventing dementia: a provocation. How can we do more to prevent dementia, save lives and reduce avoidable costs?'

Building on the momentum of the Blackfriars Consensus from Public Health England and the UK Health Forum on “promoting brain health and reducing risks for dementia in the population”, we are keen to stimulate debate and discussion about how we could tackle dementia risk factors at scale and the potential economic, health and societal benefits of dementia risk reduction.

The provocation to be launched on the day posits that we can have a significant impact on reducing the number of people who will develop dementia. The paper identifies a number of risk factors for dementia that are amenable to intervention and have modelled the impact of matching the best-practice interventions on reducing the six main risk factors from global case studies. It is estimated that over the 27-year period from 2013-2040 this could prevent nearly 3 million people developing dementia in the UK. This would reduce the costs to the state in the UK by £42.9 billion (calculated from 2013 and 2040, minus any associated costs of intervention).

We see this paper as a provocation and a starting point for more detailed and rigorous research in this field, and are keen to hear views on further research gaps in this area and other research and policy analysis being carried out.

Speakers included Rebecca Wood (Alzheimer's Research UK), Sally-Marie Bamford (ILC-UK), Phil Hope (Improving Care), Keiran Brett (Improving Care), Shirley Cramer (The Royal Society for Public Health), Dr Charles Alessi (Public Health England), Johan Vos (Alzheimer's Disease International).

#DEMENTIAandPREVENTION

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Dementia

Monday 3rd February 2014; 19:00 (for 19:20) – 22:30; Cholmondeley Room, House of Lords, Westminster, London

ILC-UK held a dinner discussion, hosting by Baroness Sally Greengross 9ILC-UK Chief Executive) in the House of Lords on the topic of dementia and stigma. This dinner was kindly supported by Alzheimer’s Research UK, Alzheimer’s Society, Medical Research Council and Pfizer, and ILC-UK are very pleased to be collaborating and working with these organisations. Baroness Greengross co-chaired the event with Professor V Hugh Perry, Chair of the Neuroscience and Mental Health Board at the Medical Research Council and Professor of Experimental Neuropathology at the University of Southampton.

Stigma is a huge barrier to diagnosis, treatment and quality of care for dementia, affecting individuals and their families. The World Alzheimer’s Report from 2012 highlights the issue through a global lens, with 75% of people with dementia and 64% of carers surveyed responding that there are negative associations with having dementia in their countries. In the UK we will see numbers of people with dementia rising to 1 million by 2021. These high numbers mean that unless we take action, large numbers of these people will continue to face stigma. Work by the Nuffield Council of Bioethics from 2009 found that a low understanding of dementia-caused behavioural changes by families and the general public can deprive patients of an early diagnosis and further support. While this existing work has drawn attention to the existence of the issue there is still much to understand about why dementia remains outside the realm of acceptable everyday conversation even as the profile of dementia rises. We need to draw together where research is exploring the real causes of this stigma.

The central focus of this dinner discussion was not to revisit the statistics on this stigmatisation, but to try to understand the factors that give rise to stigma of this vulnerable group of individuals. During the evening we heard from speakers from different fields including Peter Piot (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), Julian Hughes (Newcastle University) and Neil Harrison (Brighton and Sussex Medical School). These speakers framed the neuroscience, evolutionary biology, ethical and other issues that lie behind the negative stereotyped responses. This was followed by an opportunity for guests to discuss the issues raised and contribute to the debate where we focused on how we can seek to tackle stigma in light of knowledge and expertise on its origins.

The results of this debate will be written up as a comprehensive summary report by the ILC-UK. This synthesis will aim to shed further light on the reasons why dementia continues to carry the weight of this stigma, and how this situation might be ameliorated. By addressing the basis of stigma, we hope that education and information can become more effective in targeting the causes of negative reactions to dementia and people with dementia and ultimately removing this stigma and discrimination.

Dementia,Health

28th November 2012, The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:30 (for a 16:55 start) – 19:30

The Prime Minister’s challenge on dementia launched in 2012 stated “Dementia is one of the biggest challenges we face today – and it is one that we as a society simply cannot afford to ignore any longer. We have made some good progress over the last few years, but there’s still a long way to go. Our research knowledge on dementia lags behind other major diseases such as cancer or heart disease”.

The continued gains in longevity, with life expectancy at birth in 2010 reaching 78.2 years for men and 82.3 years for women are a particular challenge for conditions like dementia which increase rapidly with age. Dementia affects around 1 in 100 people aged 65-69 years of age but 1 in 6 of those aged 80 and over.

This event brough together speakers from academic, charity and policy sectors to address the current state of knowledge and the gaps in key areas for dementia service provision:

  • Early prevention
  • Challenges facing general practitioners and the NHS
  • Care homes and end-of-life care
  • Costs of dementia care

This was the first in a series of events being organised by the Actuarial Profession under the theme The Actuarial Profession Mortality Seminar Series: Exploring the future; defining the questions.

Agenda from the event:

16:30 – 16:55
Registration with tea/coffee

16:55 – 17:00
Welcome by co-chairs Tom Dening (The University of Nottingham) and Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre – UK)

17:00 – 17:05
Introduction, James Orr (The Actuarial Profession)

17:05 – 18:05
Presentations from:

  • Clive Ballard (Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Claire Goodman (Professor of Health Care Research)
  • Louise Robinson (RCGP National Champion for Ageing and Older People)

18:05 – 18:55
Panel discussion/debate with speakers and:

  • Martin Green (DH Independent Sector Dementia Champion)
  • Raphael Wittenberg (LSE)

18:55 – 19:00
Close by chair

19:00 – 19.30
Refreshments/wine

Members of the Actuarial Profession attending this event could claim 2 hours CPD.

View and listen to the event here.

Dementia

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:00, 01 March 2011

Kindly supported by Pfizer

The costs associated with dementia now total one per cent of global GDP, at a worldwide cost of £388bn. With an ageing population the costs are set to soar further, based only on predicted increases in the number of people with dementia, by 2030 we could see an estimated 85% increase in costs (World Alzheimer Report, 2010). This growth will put additional pressures on public finances whilst also increasing demand for formal and informal care.

Indeed dementia has been described as the most significant health and social care crisis of the 21st century and how respective governments respond will be crucial in light of the burgeoning figures. All countries will need to prioritise spending on dementia and yet at the same time reconcile need, want and value for the public purse in the coming years. Certain policy interventions on dementia could reap rewards of their own, particularly with regard to early diagnosis, prevention and investment in research and development.

The aim of the event was to discuss this critical agenda and bring together politicians, policy-makers, voluntary organisations, the private sector and academics. We hoped to explore and examine the ‘real cost’ of dementia and develop recommendations for future policy interventions.

During this event we:

  • set the scene and look at the prevalence, incidence, mortality rate and disability burden of dementia at the UK and global level;
  • explored the direct and indirect cost of dementia to the public purse, today and tomorrow;
  • explored the impact of dementia on the financial services industry; and
  • explored cost effective policy interventions and the cost of inaction (early diagnosis, prevention/dementia research).

Agenda from the event:

16.00 - 16.30
Registration and refreshments.
16.30 - 16.35
Welcome by the Actuarial Profession co - chair
16.35-16.40
Introduction by co - chair Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK and chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia
16.40–18.25
Presentations by:

  • Professor Alistair Burns, National Clinical Director for Dementia, Department of Health and Professor of Old Age Psychiatry at the University of Manchester.
  • Dr Ramon Luengo-Fernandez, Senior Researcher, Health Economics Research Centre, Department of Public Health, University of Oxford.
  • Jeremy Hughes, Chief Executive, Alzheimer's Society.
  • Emily Holzhausen, Director of Policy and Public Affairs, Carers UK.

18.25 - 18.30
Close followed by a drinks reception.

Below are a series of short interviews with some of the speakers recorded at this debate.

Dementia

Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, 9 Queen Street, Edinburgh, EH2 1JQ, 16:00, 09 February 2011

Kindly supported by Pfizer

The costs associated with dementia now total one per cent of global GDP, at a worldwide cost of £388bn. With an ageing population the costs are set to soar further, based only on predicted increases in the number of people with dementia, by 2030 we could see an estimated 85% increase in costs (World Alzheimer Report, 2010). This growth will put additional pressures on public finances whilst also increasing demand for formal and informal care.

Indeed dementia has been described as the most significant health and social care crisis of the 21st century and how respective governments respond will be crucial in light of the burgeoning figures. All countries will need to prioritise spending on dementia and yet at the same time reconcile need, want and value for the public purse in the coming years. Certain policy interventions on dementia could reap rewards of their own, particularly with regard to early diagnosis, prevention and investment in research and development.

The aim of the event was to discuss this critical agenda and bring together politicians, policy-makers, voluntary organisations, the private sector and academics. We hope to explore and examine the ‘real cost’ of dementia and develop recommendations for future policy interventions.

During this event we:

  • set the scene and look at the prevalence, incidence, mortality rate and disability burden of dementia at the UK and global level;
  • explored the direct and indirect cost of dementia to the public purse, today and tomorrow;
  • explored the impact of dementia on the financial services industry; and
  • explored cost effective policy interventions and the cost of inaction (early diagnosis, prevention/dementia research).

Agenda from the event:

16.00 - 16.30
Registration and refreshments.
16.30 - 16.35
Welcome and introduction by chair, Stewart Ritchie, Past President of the Faculty of Actuaries.
16.35 –18.25
Presentations by:

  • Professor June Andrews, Director of the Dementia Services Development Centre in the Department of Applied Social Science at the University of Stirling, Scotland.
  • Professor Martin Prince, Professor of Epidemiological Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London and Co – Director, King’s Health Partners and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Centre for Global Mental Health.
  • Henry Simmons, Chief Executive, Alzheimer Scotland.

Panel discussion with audience.
18.25 – 18.30
Close followed by a drinks reception.


Go to http://ilc-uk.coverpage.coveritlive.com for live text and audio updates from the ILC-UK and Actuarial Profession Joint Debate: 'Future Economic, Health & Social Care Costs of Dementia' at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh as it unfolds.

Interested parties were able to follow the debate in real time, hear key information and insights from the speakers, and add their thoughts and comments to the event through the comment box or using twitter and the hashtag #DementiaCosts.

This page was covered live from 4pm on Wed 9th Feb, and was available both during and after the event to read and engage with.