EVENTS:

Care,Communities and Housing,Global Ageing

ILC-UK will be holding a report launch, panel discussion and drinks reception on international perspectives for stimulating the UK Housing-with-Care sector, kindly supported by the Associated Retirement Community Operators (ARCO), on Tuesday 30th January 2018 in London.

There are important questions around how prepared the UK is to meet the housing and social care needs of older people as population ageing continues to reshape society. Appropriate housing options to facilitate ageing in place can be a powerful tool to address these issues – enabling older people wishing to downsize to do so, and providing an efficient and preventative way of addressing health and social care demands. However, the UK lags behind a number of other countries in the provision of specialist later life housing.

To help identify what might facilitate or encourage more movement in this area, ILC-UK conducted research with support from ARCO to learn from countries with more success in developing their specialist retirement housing sector. We investigated this issue in published literature, through a stakeholder roundtable in London, and with a series of expert interviews in the UK, US, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, looking at how factors related to legislation, regulation, and the cultural context might influence housing-with-care provision.

During the event, we will hear from report author and ILC-UK Senior Research Fellow, Dr Brian Beach, who will highlight a number of recommendations that could help development of this sector.

This is currently an invitation only event. If you are interested in attending, please contact ILC-UK on events@ilcuk.org.uk

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Health,Longevity

Wednesday, 22nd February 2017; 10:00 (for 10:30) – 12:30, Cass Business School, 106 Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8TZ

On Wednesday, 22nd February, the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) and Cass Business School hosted the launch of a new report entitled 'Does living in a retirement village extend life expectancy? The case of Whiteley Village'.

The UK population over age 65 is projected to increase by more than 40% during the next 17 years to over 16 million; while the number of people in the UK over age 85 is expected to double during the next 23 years to more than 3.4 million. With the population ageing so rapidly, finding ways in which the older population can live their later lives in relative health and comfort has become an increasingly important issue in the UK.

One relatively recent development is the creation of retirement villages in the UK, to house and care for the increasing numbers of older people who are attracted to this type of communal retirement living. Until now, studies of retirement villages have sought to examine funding options or quality of life outcomes for residents. However, this new report is the first of its kind to consider whether retirement village life can extend life expectancy.

Using Whiteley Retirement Village as a case study, and utilising a century’s worth of data derived from resident records, this report examines differences in life expectancy between Whiteley Village residents compared to the general population; it also accounts for gender and socio-economic disparities in life expectancy.

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Tuesday 24th January 2017; 16:00 (for 16:30 start) - 18:30 (followed by a short drinks reception); Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ

As the population of the UK continues to age, the demand for social care increases, as do the associated costs. How to pay for long term care is therefore a hot topic in the insurance world and amongst policy makers.

This event saw the launch of a new paper from the ILC-UK and Cass Business School which investigates different ways in which individuals can purchase and pay for insurance products specifically to help them to pay for their care costs in later life.

Chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross OBE, Chief Executive of the ILC-UK, the launch included a keynote presentation from report co-author Professor Les Mayhew, with responses offered by Jules Constantinou, Regional Manage, Gen Re Life/Health; Brian Fisher, Aviva/Friends Life, and Steve Lowe, Just.

Please click here to download an audio recording of the event's presentations and discussion.


The presentation slides delivered at the event can be downloaded below.

            

Care,Communities and Housing,Health,Quality of Life

Monday, 5th December 2016; 09:00 (for 09:30) – 11:30; London

In my role as Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), I will be hosting a roundtable discussion on how the Enhanced Care Worker role can be encouraged and managed.

In June 2016, ILC-UK, kindly supported by The Department of Health, conducted research and launched a report which for the first time explored the emerging role of what was termed an Enhanced Care Worker in the adult social care sector. Whilst the title of the role differs between providers, sometimes called a Care Practitioner or Senior Care Lead, it is defined as upskilling care workers to provide enhanced clinical support to the registered nurse.

The launch event and panel discussion held in the House of Lords in July 2016 stimulated an engaging and passionate discussion, and found that there was a real desire for leaders across the care homer sector to work together to develop and move towards a standardisation of the role which would benefit both staff within the sector as well as residents themselves. Many audience members expressed the desire for this conversation to continue beyond the afternoon event.

How can this role contribute towards making nursing in the care home sector more attractive? Would a national accreditation scheme be viable and desirable? And does this role align with the newly proposed Nurse Associate role?

This is an invitation only event, if you are interested in more information, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Care

Monday, 4th July; 13:30 (for 14:00) – 16:00; Committee Room G, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, London, SW1A 0PW

‘Innovate to Alleviate: Exploring How the Role of an Enhanced Care Worker Could Address Skills Shortages in the Social Care Sector’ constitutes the first qualitative investigation of an emerging role within the adult social care sector: the ‘Enhanced Care Worker’ (ECW), where care workers are trained to undertake clinical tasks traditionally done by nurses.

The first scoping review of its kind to examine the development of the ECW role, this qualitative investigation will be published on Wednesday, 22nd June. It was compiled from a number of interviews with individuals from all levels of the care home sector, including managers, Registered Nurses, ECWs, and high-level representatives from organisations that oversee a number of care homes.

In order to explore the challenges and opportunities this new role presents, this event invited parliamentarians, industry leaders, academics and care worker representatives to a panel discussion in the House of Lords.

To read more and to download the report, please click here.

Please see below for the presentation delivered at Innovate to Alleviate.

Care

Tuesday 26th April

Professor Les Mayhew of Cass Business School has drafted a new paper on the topic of means testing of adult social care.

The paper investigates the current and proposed funding formula for state support and makes a proposal for an alternative approach, which the paper argues is fairer and more transparent.

ILC-UK will be launching the paper with Professor Mayhew later in the year, but ahead of the launch, we will be holding a roundtable discussion to allow contributors to provide expert input on the draft paper as well as comment on the recommendations.

This event is a private roundtable discussion.

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Future of Age,Health,Intergenerational,Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Thursday 17th March 2016; 14:30 - 16:30; House of Lords, Westminster, London

We held an event to debate the impact of the 2016 Budget on the Future of Retirement Incomes. The debate, chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross and supported by the International Longevity Centre –UK’s (ILC-UK) Partners Programme, took place ahead of our Second Retirement Income Summit on 10th June and will feed into ILC-UK’s plans for the event.

Following the Government’s Comprehensive Spending Review in November 2015, Chancellor George Osbourne will deliver the second Budget of this Parliament’s Conservative majority Government on Wednesday 16th March 2016.

During the ILC-UK organised debate, we presented our initial analysis of the Budget, looking beyond the immediate ‘winners and losers’ commentary to consider whether the long-term challenges of low productivity, systemic under saving by private individuals and the critical underfunding of adult social care are being addressed. Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society at ILC-UK presented the analysis, and was on hand to answer any questions delegates had. We also heard from Chris Noon, Partner at Hymans Robertson, and Laurence Baxter, Head of Policy & Research at The Chartered Insurance Institute (CII).

The 2015 Budget and the Comprehensive Spending Review confounded expectations through revealing a revised projected increase of public finance provisions of £27 billion by 2020 thereby enabling the Government to halt proposed tax credit cuts. It also saw the Chancellor stick to his promise of maintaining real terms spending on health, schools and defence while further cutting local government coffers. The 2016 Budget will undoubtedly contain its own surprises, including an anticipated announcement regarding the future of pensions tax relief just one year on from “pension freedoms”.


For more information about the ILC-UK Partners Programme, please click on the below hyperlink:
ILC-UK PARTNERS PROGRAMME

Members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme are Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti, Hymans Robertson, Legal & General, Partnership, Prudential and Retirement Advantage.

 

Please see below for Ben Franklin's presentations slides from the event.

 
Care,Economics of Age,Future of Age,Health,Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Tuesday, 24th November 2015; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 17:00; 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

The Future of Ageing took place on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London. For details of this year's conference, visit www.futureofageing.org.uk.

We were grateful to Eli Lilly, McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and Partnership for Change for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day.

During the conference, we painted a picture of the future of ageing and explored the challenges and opportunities ahead. Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explored the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrows.

We explored five key areas:

  • The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society.
  • The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty?
  • The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing?
  • The future of our built environment in an ageing society.
  • The future of ageing research.

We heard presentations from:

  • Baroness Altmann (Minister for Pensions);
  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science);
  • Lord Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]);
  • Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change);
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
  • Jim Boyd (Director of Corporate Affairs at Partnership) - Jim Boyd stepped in at short notice for Steve Groves who was unwell;
  • Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council);
  • Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson);
  • Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust)
  • Elaine Draper (Director, Accessibility & Inclusion, Barclays)
  • Mario Ambrosi (Head of Communications and Public Affairs, Anchor) and
  • Baroness Kay Andrews (Member of the House of Lords Built Environment Committee, Former Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) 2006-2009)

The conference was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) and Lawrence Churchill (Trustee, ILC-UK). The full conference brochure, including biographies for each of speakers, is available to view here - ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference Brochure

This was a paid-for conference with an early bird rate available until a few month before the conference.
 

See below for the presentations slides from the day.


See below for an agenda from the day.

ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference 2015 - AGENDA


 


We were grateful to Eli Lilly, McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and Partnership for Change for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day

 

   

   
 

    

 

 

Care

Thursday 19th November, 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) - 16:30, ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminister, London, SW1P 3QB

On Thursday 19th November, the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) in partnership with Independent Age launched a major new report on migration and social care. 

'Moved to Care' explores future demand for adult social care, and estimated the potential impact of migration policy on the ability of the care workforce to meet demand.

With demand for adult social care set to rise in line with longevity, the supply of skilled and caring staff will become increasingly critical, yet there are big questions about where this supply of workers is going to come from. Against the backdrop of continued fiscal consolidation, including inevitable cuts in spending on care services, and all political parties planning to “get tough on migration”, we will need to challenge current political orthodoxies and think up creative solutions in order to deliver the type of care that many will need over the years ahead. Given the current direction of travel, it has perhaps never been more important to take stock of how we might practically develop policies to ensure adequate provision of long-term care over the decades to come.

Please see below for a copy of the presentations delivered at the launch.


To read the report in full, and access an executive summary, please click here.


To read a summary of the interviews Independent Age conducted with migrant care workers, please click here.

 

Care,Economics of Age,Future of Age

Sunday 4th October; 18:30 (for a 19:00 dinner) – 21:00; Manchester (outside the secure zone)

In early 2015 it was announced that Greater Manchester will become the first region in England to gain full control of health spending, with 10 local authorities taking over a combined health and social care budget of approximately £6 billion.

This innovation in health care is a good opportunity to achieve joined up health and social care, a move which could improve financial sustainability of health systems as well as improving the health and wellbeing of populations.
This policy has the potential to improve the success of health innovations which have a focus on prevention. The priorities and responsibilities of local government are markedly different from central government, as it is local councils that fund other areas which may benefit from a preventative approach to health care, for example social care, housing and leisure facilities. There is therefore a direct economic interest for local authorities to, for example, delay admission into care homes, or reduce childhood obesity.

The reforms in Manchester provide a positive opportunity to take a preventative approach to health care, and are a significant opportunity to meet the challenge of the big, cross-sectional challenges resulting from demographic change.
But will the reforms deliver their promise? During this dinner debate we will consider

  • How can we ensure the devolution of health spending results in increasing focus on preventative health?
  • How can we maximise improvements in health and social care whilst also saving money?
  • How will we know if the Manchester initiative has succeeded? How should we measure success?
  • Where next for integration between health and social care?

This is a private, invitation only, dinner debate so spaces are limited and will be made available on a first come first served basis. Email: davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk for more information.

Care,Communities and Housing

Wednesday 19th August 2015; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) – 18:00, followed by a drinks reception; Rennie Room, One Great George Street, London, SW1P 3AA

On the 19th August, we held a launch event of a new research report “Village life:Independence, Loneliness, and Quality of Life in Retirement Villages with Extra Care” which considers the impact of retirement villages on independence, loneliness and quality of life of residents.

The report incorporates a survey of residents and compares the sample with a comparable group of non-residents living in private housing.

The report was produced with the support of Bupa and Audley. Anchor provided additional survey respondents.

During the launch, Brian Beach, Research Fellow at ILC-UK, presented the findings of the research. Nick Sanderson, CEO of Audley, and Jeremy Porteus, Founder and Director or Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network), responded.

Following the presentations, there was an opportunity for debate, followed by a wine reception.

'Village Life: Independence, Loneliness, and Quality of Life in Retirement Villages with Extra Care' is available to download here.

Brian Beach's presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Care

Wednesday 22nd July; 15:00 - 17:00; Millbank House, House of Lords, London

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a high level stakeholder workshop, 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action', in London in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion with key stakeholders- including representatives from government, health and social care, and the charity sector- where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Care

Monday 20th July 2015; 14:00 (for 14:30) – 16:30; Health Education South London, Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DN

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action' workshop in London in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion, where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

This event is now at capacity.

Care

Thursday 16th July 2015; 14:00 (for 14:30) – 16:30; University Hospital Bristol Education Centre, Upper Maudlin Street, Bristol, BS2 8AE

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action' workshop in Bristol in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion, where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

This event is now at capacity.

Care

Wednesday 8th July 2015; 14:00 (for 14:30) – 16:30; Manchester Art Gallery, Mosley Street, Manchester M2 3JL

Health Education England and ILC-UK, will be holding a 'How nurses can shape the care response to an ageing society - A Call to Action' workshop in Manchester in July.

Nursing has a key role to play in addressing the pressures on health and social care brought about by our ageing society. The profession is well placed to both lead and manage the development of innovative service interventions and improve outcomes for patients.

Long overdue is a ‘Call to Action’ highlighting how nursing can help create a sustainable ageing society. We need an exploration of the issues, including how undergraduate degrees can better prepare the future workforce to care for an ageing population, whether a new hybrid of social and health care worker would create opportunities for improving care in the long term care setting, how we can ensure that the care home workforce have the skills and competencies to provide the best possible care, and how the profession can address the poor image of older person’s nursing.

This project aims to act as that ‘Call’, bringing together: Health Education England; Deborah Sturdy, former Nurse Adviser for Older People in the Department of Health; and ILC-UK. Most importantly, this project wants to bring together the views and opinions of nurses themselves. During the workshop we will have a roundtable discussion, where we will hear views about specific aspects of nursing related to our ageing society. The discussions from the workshop will then be used to help inform and shape the final report and ‘Call to Action’.

This workshop is by invitation only. However, if you would like further information about the project, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

This event is now at capacity.

Care,Future of Age,Quality of Life

16th July 2013, ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, Westminster, SW1P 3QB; 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) - 18:30

Older people with high support requirements want more control and greater choices as they plan out their future lives. They also want to continue to be of value and to make a contribution. Existing models of formal care are not always able to deliver the outcomes that older people are looking for.

This event draws on the recent JRF-funded study ‘Widening Choices for Older People with High Support Needs’, carried out by the National Development Team for Inclusion (NDTi) and Community Catalysts, which explores the options available for re-crafting support networks for older people in Britain. It will analyse not only the formal options available, for example Shared Lives, Homeshare, Time Banks, but also the important role played by informal care arrangements built on mutual and reciprocal support between older people and their friends and family.

The event will be chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK), and we will hear from Sian Lockwood (Chief Executive, Community Catalysts) and Jane Carrier (Associate, NDTi).

 

This event is now full. To join the waiting list, please click on the link below:

Eventbrite - 'Widening choices for people with high support needs', an ILC-UK, JRF, NDTi and Community Catalysts joint event


Agenda for the event

16:00 – 16:30
Registration

16:30 – 16:35
Welcome

16:35 – 17:00
Focus of the study - What services and arrangements exist that are based on positive relationships and older people’s contribution?
Presentation and discussion

17:00 – 17:25
Approach, key findings and solutions
Presentation and discussion

17:25 – 17:50
Widening options for older people with high support needs – moving to implementation and change
Using the learning from this study, what needs to happen to implement the findings, both at a local and national level?
Presentation and discussion

17:50 – 18:00
Summary and closing comments

18:00 – 18:30
Wine reception

Care,Health,Quality of Life

Centre for Research on Ageing, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Southampton and the International Longevity Centre – UK

International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and the University of Southampton held an afternoon tea reception in the House of Lords on Tuesday 30th April, to showcase ground-breaking interdisciplinary research in the field of social care using policy-modelling tools at the University of Southampton, which is informing policy and shaping practice.

The population of the UK is ageing. In 2012, over five million people were aged 75 and over, comprising 8% of the population; by 2031 this figure is projected to rise to 8.3m, constituting 1 in every 8 people. Older people are the major users of health and social care services and the demographic changes combined with public sector spending cuts mean that supporting older people to continue to live independently in the community is an increasingly critical issue.

Research at Southampton in the EPSRC Care Life Cycle is developing tools to assist policy makers in understanding the future demand and supply of health and social care services, facilitating them to meet the needs of an ageing population.

Two case studies were presented during the event: the first examining the demand for local authority social care services including the impact of changing living arrangements and family structures on informal support; and the second uses the example of macular degeneration treatment to examine the complex interaction between health and social care.

The papers from the event are available for download below:

Download a PDF   |   Get the free reader


Care,Economics of Age,Quality of Life

16 October 2012, The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:00 (for a 16:30 start) - 18:30

Recently, the EU’s 2012 Ageing Report argued that “the long-term public expenditure projections reveal a daunting challenge for policy makers in the EU… the fiscal impact of ageing is projected to be substantial in almost all Member States, with effects becoming apparent already during the next decade”.

During the event we heard from various speakers on the subject of the cost of our ageing society, and there was an opportunity for delegates to respond.

We considered:

  • Are we adequately considering the long term economic costs of longevity?
  • Or are we overestimating the impact?
  • Are some countries responding better than others to the economic cost of ageing?
  • How can governments across the world best respond to the fiscal challenges of demographic change?
  • How can policymakers best react to the cost of ageing?


ILC-UK will publish a policy brief following the event, summarising the latest thinking on the ‘cost of our ageing society’, drawing in particular on the EU 2012 Ageing Report and the Office of Budget Responsibility’s (OBR) Fiscal Sustainability Report.

Until recently, the financial impact of demographic change had received only limited macro-economic analysis and a recent report by the IMF argued that “few governments or pension providers adequately recognise longevity risk”.

But over the past three years, we have seen growth in national and international data on the financial cost of future demographic change. The 2009 European Commission sustainability index found that the public finances of the UK, Spain and 10 other European Union countries were at long-term high risk and that “the cost of an ageing population is expected to “dwarf” the impact of the current financial crisis many times over”.

In the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s 2010 Emergency Budget, George Osborne highlighted the scale of the UK challenge ahead, noting that “by 2015-16 we will be spending over £10 billion a year simply to meet the gap between pension contributions and payments to the unfunded pensions they support”.

The OBR Fiscal Sustainability Report has highlighted the potential impact of current demographic pressures in the UK, stating that “public finances are likely to come under pressure over the longer term, primarily as a result of an ageing population”.


Agenda from the event:

16:00 – 16:25
Registration with Tea/Coffee

16:25 – 16:30
Welcome by chair, Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK)

16:30 – 16:35
Introduction, Emma McWilliam - Editor of 'Longevity Risk', (Milliman)

16:35 – 17:35
Presentations from:
Per Eckefeldt (European Commission)
Philip Simpson (Milliman)
Daniela Silcock(representing ILC-UK)

17:35 – 18:25
Panel Discussion/Debate with:
Mark Gorman (HelpAge International)
Michelle Mitchell (Age UK)
Colin Redman (The Actuarial Profession)

18:25 – 18:30
Close by chair

18:30 –
Refreshments/Wine

ILC-UK live blogged from this event. To read the blog, please click here. Delegates were also able to join the debate on Twitter with the hashtag #costofageing.

 

Care

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London WC1V 7QJ, 09:30, 18 October 2011

Following the publication of the Dilnot Report, this event explored the future of care.

Since 2008, the International Longevity Centre-UK has been at the forefront of the debate on the future funding of long-term care. Our proposals for a social insurance-based National Care Fund and the development of a private market in care insurance were extremely influential on the development of policy under the previous Government.

The Commission on Funding of Care and Support has been tasked by the Government to review of the funding system for care and support in England. Andrew Dilnot, the Commission Chair expects to report in July 2011.

In 2011, ILC-UK organised a seminar series with Partnership to explore some of the outstanding issues ahead of the publication of the Dilnot Commission report. Our activities will culminate in the autumn of this year when we will hold a day conference for up to 100 opinion formers and decision makers at the Actuarial Profession premises in Holborn. This conference, supported by Partnership, took place on 18 October 2011, after the publication of the Dilnot Commission, but before the Government formally responds to the recommendations.

Whilst the conference was free to attend, we charged a £50 fee if registered participants do not attend on the day, or do not provide 7 days cancellation notice.

Agenda from the event:

09.30
Arrival and refreshments

10.00
Welcome Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre – UK and Jane Curtis, President, Institute and Faculty of Actuaries

The Future of Care Funding
10.10
Andrew Dilnot, Chair, Commission on Funding of Care and Support

11.00
Q&A session with Andrew Dilnot and panel debate.

Panel: Andrew Dilnot; Julia Unwin, Chief Executive, JRF; Jane Ashcroft, Chief Executive, Anchor; and Jules Constatinou, Head of Marketing, Gen Re

Paying for Care: The International Context
12.00
Doug Andrews, University of Southampton

12.30
Lunch

13.15
Welcome back

Housing and Care
13.15

The Role of Extra Care: Dylan Kneale, Senior Researcher, ILC-UK

13.35
Housing and Care: Julia Unwin, Chief Executive JRF

13.50
Housing, Wealth and Care: Dean Mirfin, Group Director, Key Retirement Solutions

14.05
Q&A session with speakers and panel debate


Panel: Andrea Rozario, Chief Executive, SHIP Equity Release; Julia Unwin; Dylan Kneale; Dean Mirfin

Care Funding: The Role of the Private Sector
14.50
Otto Thoresen, Director General, ABI.

15.00
Steve Groves, Chief Executive Officer, Partnership

15.10
Ros Altmann, Director General, SAGA

15.20
Concluding thoughts - Where next for Care?: Baroness Greengross

15.30
Close: Jane Curtis

Care

Manchester, 08:00, 03 October 2011

Private meeting at the Conservative Party Conference

We ran a private breakfast meeting at the Conservative Party Conference this autumn, hosted by the International Longevity Centre-UK and sponsored by Barchester Healthcare, a leading care provider.

The meeting provided an opportunity for a select group of stakeholders to come together in private to discuss how we build a new consensus on care funding, following the publication of the Dilnot report.

It was a highly interactive event with the emphasis on debate, rather than speeches and questions to the panel, as we seek to help move forward the debate on care funding, looking in particular at the role of the private sector in the future of care provision.

Care

Liverpool, 12:15, 27 September 2011

Private meeting at the Labour Party Conference

We ran a private lunch meeting at the Labour Party Conference this autumn, hosted by the International Longevity Centre-UK and sponsored by Barchester Healthcare, a leading care provider.

The meeting provided an opportunity for a select group of stakeholders to come together in private to discuss how we build a new consensus on care funding, following the publication of the Dilnot report.

It was a highly interactive event with the emphasis on debate, rather than speeches and questions to the panel, as we seek to help move forward the debate on care funding, looking in particular at the role of the private sector in the future of care provision.

Care

Birmingham, 12:15, 19 September 2011

Private meeting at the Liberal Democrat Party Conference

We ran a private lunch meeting at the Liberal Democrat Party Conference this autumn, hosted by the International Longevity Centre-UK and sponsored by Barchester Healthcare, a leading care provider.

The meeting provided an opportunity for a select group of stakeholders to come together in private to discuss how we build a new consensus on care funding, following the publication of the Dilnot report.

It was a highly interactive event with the emphasis on debate, rather than speeches and questions to the panel, as we seek to help move forward the debate on care funding, looking in particular at the role of the private sector in the future of care provision.

Care

ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB, 16:00, 13 September 2011

The launch of new research into the benefits of extra care housing.

In July 2011, Andrew Dilnot published the report of the Commission on funding of Care and Support. Within the report, the Commissioners highlighted the potential role for extra care housing. They said “the Commission hopes that more people will be able to consider extra care housing in the future, if they are more aware of this type of provision and can be more certain over their financial planning.” Extra care housing represents an integrated model of housing and social care support that potentially holds fiscal and wider benefits for older people and the state. In addition, extra care housing might offer a way of unlocking the housing wealth of the ‘baby boomer’ generation approaching retirement, therefore providing a real alternative to the spectacle of people selling their homes to pay for residential care when their needs become acute. Yet for extra care to be a sustainable option for the funders of care, it is vital that we know more about the cost effectiveness and efficiency of extra care housing as a model.

This event brought together three speakers to review some of the main debates surrounding extra care housing as well as to present some new findings.

Over the last year, ILC-UK has been undertaking a major piece of research into the benefits of extra care housing through examining resident outcomes. Using longitudinal data from 3 providers, Extra Care Charitable Trust, Retirement Security Limited and Audley, with additional funding provided from Housing Learning and Improvement Network (Housing LIN), we have undertaken a review which explores the characteristics of residents, the notion of extra care housing as a home for life, the health outcomes of residents, and patterns of health service usage of residents. We have also explored the costs and benefits associated with our findings. This new research, presented by Dr Dylan Kneale, also explores how the outcomes of residents in extra care could differ from the outcomes of older people living in the community in receipt of domiciliary care.

Since 2004, the Department of Health has funded a large number of extra care schemes. The the University of Kent’s Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) have been undertaking a major evaluation of these schemes and Robin Darton, Senior Research Fellow and project lead, presented the early findings. Housing LIN has been a long standing proponent of models of housing with care, and Jeremy Porteus, Director of the organisation, discussed the findings in greater detail and identify future directions for the sector. This event was supported by the Housing LIN. We are grateful to our partners: Extra Care Charitable Trust, Retirement Security and Audley, for making this research possible.

Agenda from the event:

16.00
Event registration

16.15
Welcome – Baroness Sally Greengross

16.20
“Establishing the Extra in Extra Care” – Dr Dylan Kneale, ILC-UK

16.40
Robin Darton, PSSRU

17.00
Jeremy Porteus, Housing LIN

17.20
Discussion, debate and questions

18.00
Wine reception

The presentations from the event can be viewed below:

Care

ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB, 16:00, 02 June 2011

The Future of Care Funding Seminar Series.

“Social Care is an essential human need, something most of us will need at some point in our lives, whether for ourselves or those close to us. How well we look after each other says a great deal about the strength and character of our society.”

Rt Hon Andrew Lansley CBE MP, Secretary of State for Health & Paul Burstow MP, Minister of State for Care Services. Foreword to the “Vision for Adult Social Care” (November 2010).

Since 2008 the International Longevity Centre-UK has been at the forefront of the debate on funding long-term care. Our proposals for a social insurance-based National Care Fund and the development of a private market in care insurance were extremely influential upon the development of policy under the previous Government.

ILC-UK has also made significant contributions to several areas which impact on long-term care. These include:

  • The role of unpaid carers;
  • The integration of health and care;
  • The changing nature of retirement and pension reform;
  • The role of new technology in delivering care; and
  • The costs and benefits of extra care housing.

The work of the Commission on the funding of care and support, led by Andrew Dilnot, will be vital to delivering a sustainable funding solution for long-term care, but addressing this issue alone will not be sufficient to achieving affordable, effective and equitable policy solutions for long-term care in an ageing society.

The Government’s Vision for Adult Social Care, launched in November 2010 set three values. The Government wants to develop social care which gives people the Freedom to choose services and a shift of power from the centre. They want social care to be Fair in terms of funding and they emphasised the need to move towards a shared Responsibility for care between the individual and the state.

In England, gross public sector expenditure on personal social services was £20.1 bn, of which £8.7bn was spent on older people. Julian Forder has estimated additional private expenditure on care of £5.9bn. Additional state support is provided to support the care needs of older people through the Disability Living Allowance (£2.4bn for over 65s) and Attendance Allowance (£4.4bn). In other words, around £22bn is currently spent on care for the over 65s. On top of this, the value of voluntary care has been estimated as double this figure (Mayhew, 2010).

The International Longevity Centre- UK was delighted to be working with Partnership Assurance on a series of seminars exploring the role of the private sector in delivering and supporting care. Partnership is the fastest growing significant life company in the UK and is the largest provider of Long Term Care insurance in the UK, with 80% of the market. It is a specialist provider of financial solutions for people with health/ lifestyle conditions, as well as those suffering from a serious medical impairment. It is expert in the field of medical underwriting and has a unique in-house data set.

These seminars, which took place at 11 Tufton Street, will influence public and private thinking ahead of the publication of the report of the Commission on the funding of care and support.

The details of the final seminar are below:

Creating a market for innovation in care
2 June 2011: 16.00-19.00
ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB

A major theme of the Governments Vision for Adult Social Care, was of the role of the Big Society and localism. The Government stated that they “want to see a real shift of power from the state to people and communities”. They talked of the creation of a social movement and saw care as having an important role in reinforcing personal and community resilience.

The last seminar in our series explored how we can create the care marketplace, whilst also strengthen communities. We explored innovations in care whilst also exploring where the care marketplace has failed. We explored the potential for tackling these market failures.

Agenda from the event:

4.10pm
Introduction from Chair (Caroline Waters, BT)

4.15pm
Welcome from Partnership – about the series.

4.30pm
Professor Michael Kenny and Henry Kippin

4.50pm
Christabel Shawcross, Strategic Director of Adult & Community Services, Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead

5.05pm
Alex Fox, NAAPS

5.15pm
Rosie Farrar, NESTA

5.25pm
Discussion and debate

6.15pm
Refreshments

Care

ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB, 16:00, 17 May 2011

The Future of Care Funding Seminar Series.

“Social Care is an essential human need, something most of us will need at some point in our lives, whether for ourselves or those close to us. How well we look after each other says a great deal about the strength and character of our society.”

Rt Hon Andrew Lansley CBE MP, Secretary of State for Health & Paul Burstow MP, Minister of State for Care Services. Foreword to the “Vision for Adult Social Care” (November 2010).

Since 2008 the International Longevity Centre-UK has been at the forefront of the debate on funding long-term care. Our proposals for a social insurance-based National Care Fund and the development of a private market in care insurance were extremely influential upon the development of policy under the previous Government.

ILC-UK has also made significant contributions to several areas which impact on long-term care. These include:

  • The role of unpaid carers;
  • The integration of health and care;
  • The changing nature of retirement and pension reform;
  • The role of new technology in delivering care; and
  • The costs and benefits of extra care housing.

The work of the Commission on the funding of care and support, led by Andrew Dilnot, will be vital to delivering a sustainable funding solution for long-term care, but addressing this issue alone will not be sufficient to achieving affordable, effective and equitable policy solutions for long-term care in an ageing society.

The Government’s Vision for Adult Social Care, launched in November 2010 set three values. The Government wants to develop social care which gives people the Freedom to choose services and a shift of power from the centre. They want social care to be Fair in terms of funding and they emphasised the need to move towards a shared Responsibility for care between the individual and the state.

In England, gross public sector expenditure on personal social services was £20.1 bn, of which £8.7bn was spent on older people. Julian Forder has estimated additional private expenditure on care of £5.9bn. Additional state support is provided to support the care needs of older people through the Disability Living Allowance (£2.4bn for over 65s) and Attendance Allowance (£4.4bn). In other words, around £22bn is currently spent on care for the over 65s. On top of this, the value of voluntary care has been estimated as double this figure (Mayhew, 2010).

The International Longevity Centre- UK is delighted to be working with Partnership Assurance on a series of seminars exploring the role of the private sector in delivering and supporting care. Partnership is the fastest growing significant life company in the UK and is the largest provider of Long Term Care insurance in the UK, with 80% of the market. It is a specialist provider of financial solutions for people with health/ lifestyle conditions, as well as those suffering from a serious medical impairment. It is expert in the field of medical underwriting and has a unique in-house data set.

These seminars, which took place at 11 Tufton Street, will influence public and private thinking ahead of the publication of the report of the Commission on the funding of care and support.

The details of the second seminar are below:

Visions for care funding
17 May 2011: 16.00-19.00
ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB

The second seminar of this series built on the first event and brought together a group of experts to highlight their own visions for care funding. Each were given 10 minutes to present their “wish list” for the Commission on the Funding of Care and Support. Dr Craig Berry of ILC-UK presented a new paper from ILC-UK on our perspective on the care funding.

Agenda from the event:

4.10pm
Introduction from Baroness Greengross

4.15pm
Peter Watt Counsel and Care

4.25pm
Partnership Assurance

4.35pm
Andrew Harrop Age UK.

4.45pm
Stephen Burke, United for All Ages

4.55pm
Dr Craig Berry, ILC-UK

5.10pm
Discussion and debate

6.00pm
Refreshments

Care

ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB, 16:00, 05 April 2011

The Future of Care Funding Seminar Series.

“Social Care is an essential human need, something most of us will need at some point in our lives, whether for ourselves or those close to us. How well we look after each other says a great deal about the strength and character of our society.”

Rt Hon Andrew Lansley CBE MP, Secretary of State for Health & Paul Burstow MP, Minister of State for Care Services. Foreword to the “Vision for Adult Social Care” (November 2010).

Since 2008 the International Longevity Centre-UK has been at the forefront of the debate on funding long-term care. Our proposals for a social insurance-based National Care Fund and the development of a private market in care insurance were extremely influential upon the development of policy under the previous Government.

ILC-UK has also made significant contributions to several areas which impact on long-term care. These include:

  • The role of unpaid carers;
  • The integration of health and care;
  • The changing nature of retirement and pension reform;
  • The role of new technology in delivering care; and
  • The costs and benefits of extra care housing.

The work of the Commission on the funding of care and support, led by Andrew Dilnot, will be vital to delivering a sustainable funding solution for long-term care, but addressing this issue alone will not be sufficient to achieving affordable, effective and equitable policy solutions for long-term care in an ageing society.

The Government’s Vision for Adult Social Care, launched in November 2010 set three values. The Government wants to develop social care which gives people the Freedom to choose services and a shift of power from the centre. They want social care to be Fair in terms of funding and they emphasised the need to move towards a shared Responsibility for care between the individual and the state.

In England, gross public sector expenditure on personal social services was £20.1 bn, of which £8.7bn was spent on older people. Julian Forder has estimated additional private expenditure on care of £5.9bn. Additional state support is provided to support the care needs of older people through the Disability Living Allowance (£2.4bn for over 65s) and Attendance Allowance (£4.4bn). In other words, around £22bn is currently spent on care for the over 65s. On top of this, the value of voluntary care has been estimated as double this figure (Mayhew, 2010).

The International Longevity Centre- UK is delighted to be working with Partnership Assurance on a series of seminars exploring the role of the private sector in delivering and supporting care. Partnership is the fastest growing significant life company in the UK and is the largest provider of Long Term Care insurance in the UK, with 80% of the market. It is a specialist provider of financial solutions for people with health/ lifestyle conditions, as well as those suffering from a serious medical impairment. It is expert in the field of medical underwriting and has a unique in-house data set.

These seminars, which tookplace at 11 Tufton Street, will influence public and private thinking ahead of the publication of the report of the Commission on the funding of care and support.

The details of the first seminar are below:

The Private Sector’s role in care
5 April 2011: 16.00-19.00
ILC-UK, 11 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB

The foreword to the Government’s Vision stated that they “want people to have the freedom to choose the services that are right for them from a vibrant plural market”. Of course, for this to be possible there has to be adequate funding to support the development of a care market.

This seminar explored the role of the private sector in paying for care. We explored the different options for private sector engagement in care funding in the future. We considered how these models of engagement can be best made to work and consider what Government needs to do to facilitate. We explored the role of insurance and of equity release.

Les Mayhew presented his paper on the “Role of Private Finance in Paying for Long Term Care”. Chris Horlick from Partnership Assurance highlighted current and potential innovations in insurance. Andrea Rozario from Safe Home Income Plans (SHIP) explored issues relating to asset decumulation while Nick Starling from the ABI contributed with his comments on the role insurers play in care planning and Martin Green of the English Community Care Association (ECCA) responded from the perspective of a private sector care provider.

Agenda from the event:

4.10pm
Introduction from Baroness Greengross

4.15pm
Professor Les Mayhew “The Role of Private Finance in Paying for Long Term Care”

4.45pm
Chris Horlick, Partnership Assurance. “The role of insurance in paying for care”

5pm
Andrea Rozario, SHIP “The role of Equity Release”

5.10pm
Nick Starling, ABI

5.20pm
Martin Green, ECCA and ILC-UK trustee “The current role and the potential of the private sector to deliver diversity, quality and choice in health and social care services”

5.30pm
Discussion and debate

6.15pm
Refreshments


Professor Les Mayhew's full paper reference: Mayhew, L., M. Karlsson, and B. Ricklayzen, B. (2010) The Role of Private Finance in Paying for Long Term Care. The Economic Journal, Vol 120, Issue 548, F478–F504, November 2010

The presentations from this event are available to view below.

 

Care

Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:00, 10 November 2009

Supported by the Nuffield Foundation

It has finally happened. After many years in the political wilderness, the issue of long-term care funding has entered the mainstream of political debate. Despite the global recession and ‘credit crunch’, it is increasingly recognised that one of the biggest challenges confronting the UK remains how to best fund long-term care for older people.

In February 2008, the ILC-UK published “A National Care Fund for Long-term Care”. This report proposed a state-sponsored insurance fund to pool the risk of needing care for the post-retirement phase, into which individuals with sufficient means would contribute whether as a lump-sum at 65, through income payments or as a charge on their estate.

July 2009 saw the publication of the Government’s Green Paper on social care: “Shaping the Future of Care Together“. This ambitious and far-reaching document sets out a vision for a ‘National Care Service’ with reforms proposed across social care delivery, organisation and the funding of older people’s long-term care.

The Green Paper set out three different options regarding care funding, but which exclude consideration of the ‘hotel costs’ of residential care. The first ‘partnership’ model continues the current system of means-tested co-payment state support, but with disability benefits reallocated via the proposed ‘National Care Service’ and levels of support more precisely proportional to need.

The second and third options both propose state-sponsored insurance schemes for the retirement phase with individuals given full flexibility in when and how to pay, including lump-sums paid on retirement or as a charge on their estate. One option would be mandatory, which would ensure maximum coverage and enable progressive contributions, but would pose a political challenge. The other option proposes a voluntary approach to insurance, together with the possibility of individuals using a private sector market for long-term care insurance products, rather than a state-sponsored insurance fund.

However, in recent weeks, this agenda has taken a surprising turn with the Government announcing a policy of free personal care in the home for individuals with the ‘highest needs’.

Days later, the Conservative Party proposed a voluntary insurance scheme: individuals would pay an £8000 lump-sum at 65 to insure against all potential residential care costs, albeit ignoring the cost of personal care in the home. The Conservatives say this insurance could be operated by existing private-sector insurers using branded products.

This debate explored the questions:

  • Should the state adopt a mandatory or voluntary approach to insurance for long-term care?
  • Should insurance be left to a private sector market or organised by the state? What are the likely benefits of each approach, such as levels of take-up?
  • Should insurance schemes for long-term care focus on personal care, residential care, or both?
  • What are the trade-offs between a national and locally organised system of care funding?
  • How can means-testing eventually be eliminated from the long-term care funding system so that everyone has an incentive to save for retirement?
  • What are the opportunities and pitfalls associated with long-term care funding becoming a mainstream political issue?


Speakers/ Panel included:

  • Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK;
  • Ian Sissons, Actuary, Munich Re;
  • James Lloyd, Senior Research Fellow, Social Market Foundation and author of “A National Care Fund for Long-term Care”;
  • Professor Julien Forder, University of Kent and co-author of the Wanless social care review: “Securing good care for older people: Taking a long-term view”;
  • Stephen Burke, Chief Executive, Counsel and Care; and
  • Sue Regan, Chief Executive, Resolution Foundation.


A copy of the following presentations can be downloaded:

Care

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:30, 28 April 2009

This seminar featured new research evaluating ‘care coordination services’ and its potential for creating preventative savings in health and social care.

This is a critical period for the English social care system. This year will see the publication of a Green Paper setting out the Government’s vision for social care reform. Simultaneously, public finances are under unprecedented strain. Like all aspects of public spending, the social care system faces a period of intense budgetary pressure, regardless of projected increases in demand for social care associated with population ageing.

Now is therefore an excellent time to explore how changes in service design and delivery can achieve cost savings across the health and social care system. There has long been interest in whether the identification of potentially vulnerable older people at risk of unnecessary hospital admission, together with the provision of more holistic packages of support and information, could be effective in preventing higher levels of need and costs.

This seminar featured a presentation of new research from the Cass Business School evaluating care coordination services developed in the London Borough of Brent under the aegis of the Department of Health’s ‘Partnerships for Older People’s Projects’. This presentation can be found by clicking 'Download a PDF' at the bottom of this page.

The audience comprised of service commissioners from health and social care, academics, policy makers, civil servants, Actuaries, academic researchers, insurers, the third sector, a journalist and people that actually deliver the service the care coordinators and a GP.

The event explored:

  • How should resources be directed at low-level types of support, which do not qualify as health or social care, but which can generate savings?
  • What types of delivery agents from across the public, private and third-sectors are appropriate for delivering preventative interventions?
  • If cost-savings are possible from the right kind of preventative interventions, how can policymakers align the interests of those agencies funding such services and those seeing the benefits?


Speakers included:

  • Professor Les Mayhew, Cass Business School
  • Guy Robertson, National Programme Lead - Prevention and Early Intervention Older People and Dementia Division Social Care, Local Government & Partnerships, Department of Health
  • Christabel Shawcross, Assistant Director of Community Care, London Borough of Brent
  • Thirza Sawtell, Director of Strategic Commissioning, NHS Brent
  • Stephen Burke, Chief Executive, Counsel & Care


A paper published December 2008 online by the Health Care Management Science journal entitled ‘On the effectiveness of care co-ordination services aimed at preventing hospital admissions and emergency attendances’ by Professor Mayhew was available at the event and can be downloaded at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_86.pdf.

‘The economic, health and social benefits of care co-ordination for older people- The Integrated Care Co-ordination Service (ICCS)’, published by the Cass Business School was also available at the event and can be downloaded at http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_85.pdf.

Care

RSA, 8 John Adam Street, London, WC2N 6EZ, 15:30, 17 September 2008

The launch of major new research into the effects of care provision, made possible by the Nuffield Foundation.

As the UK population ages, demand for personal care within society will increase. However, the majority of care will continue to be provided as ‘unpaid care’ by family members, with the growing demand for care expected to fall increasingly on older cohorts.

This means that understanding the experience of older carers and the effects of caring on their lives has never been more important.

"Living and Caring? An Investigation of the Experience of Older Carers" uses detailed quantitative analysis to compare the lives of carers and non-carers across multiple domains such as quality of life, health, income and housing.

This research will be launched at an event at the RSA on Wednesday September 17th, 2008. Following a presentation of key findings, a panel will discuss the implications of the research, including:

  • As demographic change takes hold, how much can society rely on the provision of unpaid care by older people?
  • How can public policy build on the capacity of individuals and their families to cope and adapt to periods of care provision?
  • What do differences in the experience of carers suggest for the future direction of policy?


Agenda from the event:

15.15 - 15.30
Registration and Coffee
16.30 - 15.35
Welcome by Chair, Mervyn Koehler, Help the Aged
15.35 - 16.15
Presentation:

  • Andy Ross, Senior Researcher, NatCen
  • James Lloyd, Head of Policy & Research, ILC-UK

16.15 - 16.45
Panel Response:

  • Anne McDonald, Programme Director - Community Wellbeing, Local Government Association
  • Caroline Bernard, Policy + Communications Manager, Counsel and Care
  • Madeleine Starr, Strategic Projects Manager, Carers UK

16.45 - 17.25
Debate
17.25 - 17.30
Close by Chair
17.30
End

This event was free and open to all; however, registration was required.

Care

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:30, 26 February 2008

The future funding of long-term care for older people is one of the biggest public policy challenges confronting the UK Government.

This challenge has been brought on by an urgent need to increase spending on long-term care to raise standards, as well as demographic change, which will see demand for care steadily rising in coming decades.

Debate around these issues has usually focused on some form of state-funded universal free long-term care for older people, so that the risk of needing long-term care is shared across the whole population, with every individual insured up to a minimum level of provision.

Within such a model, there has always been a tension around wealthier older people with sufficient means to buy into some form of long-term care insurance, whether publicly or privately organised, becoming entitled to free care paid for by taxpayers.

However, in recent years, house price inflation has seen the wealth of older cohorts increase dramatically, while younger cohorts have conversely become one of the most indebted generations in history. The tension within the model of state-funded universal free care has therefore been amplified enormously.

This debate addressed the following questions:

  • Can models of universal free long-term care for older people paid for by the state still be described as 'fair'?
  • If the fairness of such models has been undermined by changes in patterns of wealth across the generations, what new models of long-term care funding are available?
  • Is it possible to overcome these issues without losing the best aspects of universal free care, such as guaranteed minimum levels of provision?


Agenda from the event:

16.00 - 16.30
Registration and tea
16.30 - 16.40
Welcome and introduction:

  • Stewart Ritchie, President of the Faculty of Actuaries
  • Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, ILC-UK

16.40 - 17.20
Presentation by James Lloyd, Head of Policy & Research, ILC-UK
17.20 - 17.35
Panel Response:

  • Professor Ruth Hancock, School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, University of East Anglia
  • Nicholas Barr, Professor of Public Economics, London School of Economics

17.35 - 18.25
Debate
6.25 - 18.30
Close by Baroness Sally Greengross, ILC-UK
18.30
Drinks

This event was free and open to all; however, registration was required.