EVENTS:

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Health,Longevity

Wednesday, 22nd February 2017; 10:00 (for 10:30) – 12:30, Cass Business School, 106 Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8TZ

On Wednesday, 22nd February, the International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK) and Cass Business School hosted the launch of a new report entitled 'Does living in a retirement village extend life expectancy? The case of Whiteley Village'.

The UK population over age 65 is projected to increase by more than 40% during the next 17 years to over 16 million; while the number of people in the UK over age 85 is expected to double during the next 23 years to more than 3.4 million. With the population ageing so rapidly, finding ways in which the older population can live their later lives in relative health and comfort has become an increasingly important issue in the UK.

One relatively recent development is the creation of retirement villages in the UK, to house and care for the increasing numbers of older people who are attracted to this type of communal retirement living. Until now, studies of retirement villages have sought to examine funding options or quality of life outcomes for residents. However, this new report is the first of its kind to consider whether retirement village life can extend life expectancy.

Using Whiteley Retirement Village as a case study, and utilising a century’s worth of data derived from resident records, this report examines differences in life expectancy between Whiteley Village residents compared to the general population; it also accounts for gender and socio-economic disparities in life expectancy.

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Care,Communities and Housing,Health,Quality of Life

Monday, 5th December 2016; 09:00 (for 09:30) – 11:30; London

In my role as Chief Executive of the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), I will be hosting a roundtable discussion on how the Enhanced Care Worker role can be encouraged and managed.

In June 2016, ILC-UK, kindly supported by The Department of Health, conducted research and launched a report which for the first time explored the emerging role of what was termed an Enhanced Care Worker in the adult social care sector. Whilst the title of the role differs between providers, sometimes called a Care Practitioner or Senior Care Lead, it is defined as upskilling care workers to provide enhanced clinical support to the registered nurse.

The launch event and panel discussion held in the House of Lords in July 2016 stimulated an engaging and passionate discussion, and found that there was a real desire for leaders across the care homer sector to work together to develop and move towards a standardisation of the role which would benefit both staff within the sector as well as residents themselves. Many audience members expressed the desire for this conversation to continue beyond the afternoon event.

How can this role contribute towards making nursing in the care home sector more attractive? Would a national accreditation scheme be viable and desirable? And does this role align with the newly proposed Nurse Associate role?

This is an invitation only event, if you are interested in more information, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Health,Quality of Life

Wednesday, 16th November 2016; 17:30 (for 18:00, with canapés and refreshments) – 19:15; Old Operating Theatre Museum, 9a St Thomas Street, London, SE1 9RY

The Jack Watters debate - tackling antimicrobial resistance in an ageing society, took place on the 16th November 2016 at the Old Operating Theatre Museum in London.

This event was dedicated to a long term supporter of the ILC and a pioneer in championing the health and well-being of ageing people, Dr. Jack Watters.

The debate was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) and saw the participation of the following speakers: 

  • Professor David Salisbury CB, Associate Fellow, Centre on Global Health Security Chatham House
  • Matthew Edwards, Head of Mortality and Longevity, Towers Watson
  • Michelle Bresnahan, Founder, A Life for a Cure
  • Dr Gina Radford, Deputy Chief Medical Officer

Jack Watters served as Pfizer US Vice President for External Medical Affairs. In a pharmaceutical career spanning more than thirty years, Jack pioneered the landmark Diflucan Partnership Programme; spearheaded the ‘Get Old’ campaign to promote positive attitudes and approaches to ageing, and worked tirelessly in the fields of human rights, HIV/AIDS and ageing.

To celebrate Jack’s life and contribution to public health advancements around the world, the ILC-UK organised this special debate on one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century: the threat posed to medicine by the rise of antimicrobial resistance. Fittingly held in the oldest operating theatre in Europe, the debate focused on what must be done to prevent (in the words of Lord O’Neill, Chair of the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance) medicine being plunged ‘back into the dark ages’.

Senior policymakers and patient group representatives discussed the UK, and global challenge posed by antimicrobial resistance; the specific risk posed to healthy longevity; the role of vaccination in reducing antibiotic usage; and what Government and civil society can do to meet these challenges.

Please see below for the presentation slides from the event:

 
Matthew Edwards' presentation slides:

16Nov16 - The Dr Jack Watters Debate - Matthew Edwards Slides by ILC-UK on Scribd

Health,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

The International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK), invites you to be an audience member at a high level Inquiry into the relationship between alcohol and employment in the over 50s population in the UK. The Inquiry will be led by the ILC-UK and supported by the Drink Wise Age Well partnership which brings together alcohol and ageing charities and academic institutions from across the UK.

The Inquiry will be held over three dates with each session focussing on a different theme:


Alcohol and over 50s out of work and seeking employment
Monday 18th April; 10:30 – 12:30
Committee Room 3, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, SW1A 0PW

Eventbrite - Alcohol and over 50s out of work and seeking employment


Alcohol and over 50s currently in employment
Friday 6th May; 10:30 – 12:30
Committee Room 3, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, SW1A 0PW

Eventbrite - Alcohol and over 50s currently in employment


Alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement
Monday 23rd May; 14:30 – 16:30
Committee Room 3, House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, SW1A 0PW

Eventbrite - Alcohol and over 50s transitioning to, or currently in, retirement


You are welcome to attend any one of these Inquiry sessions. To register, click on the buttons above.

Please note that due to House of Lords security regulations, you are required to register for each session you are interested in attending. You will not be permitted entry into the House of Lords if you have not registered.

Drink Wise, Age Well is a Big Lottery Funded programme, set up to address the often hidden problems surrounding alcohol-related harm in the over 50s. As well as providing targeted community interventions, the programme will also be building a robust evidence base to assess what the biggest challenges are surrounding older adults and alcohol-related harm in the UK today. Our research has found that there is an often complex relationship between employment, unemployment, retirement and alcohol amongst the over 50s in the UK which needs to be fully understood.

In light of this, we are holding an Inquiry to reach out and engage with a wide cross section of stakeholders and generate wider political and public awareness, understanding and traction on this issue. Each Inquiry session will hear from expert witnesses, and the evidence emerging will contribute to our next annual State of the Nation report on alcohol-related harm amongst the over 50s.

During each two hour session, each expert will be invited to give an overview of their experiences and views on the topic, and audience members will have an opportunity to speak or ask questions after all of our expert witnesses have delivered their evidence to the Inquiry.

We look forward to welcoming you to any or all of the Inquiry sessions into alcohol, employment and the over 50s. If you have any queries about the Inquiry please do not hesitate to contact ILC-UK on events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Global Ageing,Health,International

Thursday 21st April 2016, 12:30 – 14:30, Belgium

ILC-UK held a private lunch debate, supported by Prudential plc, for senior decision makers and policy experts to discuss how Europe can best respond to the economic and social challenges and opportunities emerging as a result of demographic change.

To introduce the debate, Richard Jackson, President of the Global Aging Institute and one of the world’s foremost authorities on ageing, explored the emerging demographic, economic, and social trends shaping the future of retirement. He discussed his most recent research findings on East Asia and the similarities and differences between the outlook there and in Europe.

ILC-UK then presented its own economic analysis of the impact of global demographic change on Europe and highlighted some of the policy implications for Member States.

During the lunch attendees debated:

  • Might Europe’s Growth Strategy be undermined by demographic change?
  • What can Europe learn from how other parts of the world are maximising the economic potential of an ageing society?
  • Is Europe’s Silver Economy well placed to benefit from the world-wide ageing trend?
  • How can initiatives (e.g. Covenant on Demographic Change) focused on helping cities and regions work best?
  • How can the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing help deliver a healthier older age?
  • What more can European policymakers do to help extend working lives and support active and productive ageing?
  • How can businesses help Europe to maximise the economic potential of an ageing society?

Please see below for a summary of the points raised at this roundtable discussion

Care,Communities and Housing,Economics of Age,Future of Age,Health,Intergenerational,Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Thursday 17th March 2016; 14:30 - 16:30; House of Lords, Westminster, London

We held an event to debate the impact of the 2016 Budget on the Future of Retirement Incomes. The debate, chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross and supported by the International Longevity Centre –UK’s (ILC-UK) Partners Programme, took place ahead of our Second Retirement Income Summit on 10th June and will feed into ILC-UK’s plans for the event.

Following the Government’s Comprehensive Spending Review in November 2015, Chancellor George Osbourne will deliver the second Budget of this Parliament’s Conservative majority Government on Wednesday 16th March 2016.

During the ILC-UK organised debate, we presented our initial analysis of the Budget, looking beyond the immediate ‘winners and losers’ commentary to consider whether the long-term challenges of low productivity, systemic under saving by private individuals and the critical underfunding of adult social care are being addressed. Ben Franklin, Head of Economics of an Ageing Society at ILC-UK presented the analysis, and was on hand to answer any questions delegates had. We also heard from Chris Noon, Partner at Hymans Robertson, and Laurence Baxter, Head of Policy & Research at The Chartered Insurance Institute (CII).

The 2015 Budget and the Comprehensive Spending Review confounded expectations through revealing a revised projected increase of public finance provisions of £27 billion by 2020 thereby enabling the Government to halt proposed tax credit cuts. It also saw the Chancellor stick to his promise of maintaining real terms spending on health, schools and defence while further cutting local government coffers. The 2016 Budget will undoubtedly contain its own surprises, including an anticipated announcement regarding the future of pensions tax relief just one year on from “pension freedoms”.


For more information about the ILC-UK Partners Programme, please click on the below hyperlink:
ILC-UK PARTNERS PROGRAMME

Members of the ILC-UK Partners Programme are Anchor, Audley, Aviva, Equiniti, Hymans Robertson, Legal & General, Partnership, Prudential and Retirement Advantage.

 

Please see below for Ben Franklin's presentations slides from the event.

 
Care,Economics of Age,Future of Age,Health,Pensions,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Tuesday, 24th November 2015; 09:00 (for a 09:30 start) – 17:00; 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

The Future of Ageing took place on Tuesday 24th November 2015 in London. For details of this year's conference, visit www.futureofageing.org.uk.

We were grateful to Eli Lilly, McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and Partnership for Change for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day.

During the conference, we painted a picture of the future of ageing and explored the challenges and opportunities ahead. Through our unique lifecourse focus we will explored the potential impact of ageing not just on today’s older population, but also on tomorrows.

We explored five key areas:

  • The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society.
  • The future of retirement income: Wealthy pensioners or persistent poverty?
  • The future of our economy in an ageing society: Adapting our economy to ageing?
  • The future of our built environment in an ageing society.
  • The future of ageing research.

We heard presentations from:

  • Baroness Altmann (Minister for Pensions);
  • Professor Sir Mark Walport (Government Chief Scientific Adviser [GCSA] and Head of the Government Office for Science);
  • Lord Willetts (Executive Chair at Resolution Foundation, and former Minister of State [Department for Business, Innovation and Skills]);
  • Lord Filkin (Chair of the Centre for Ageing Better and Chair of the House of Lords Committee on Public Service and Demographic Change);
  • Paul Johnson (Director, Institute for Fiscal Studies);
  • Jim Boyd (Director of Corporate Affairs at Partnership) - Jim Boyd stepped in at short notice for Steve Groves who was unwell;
  • Professor Jane Elliott (Chief Executive, Economic and Social Research Council);
  • Steven Baxter (Partner, Hymans Robertson);
  • Professor Ian Philp (Deputy Medical Director for Older People’s Care, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust)
  • Elaine Draper (Director, Accessibility & Inclusion, Barclays)
  • Mario Ambrosi (Head of Communications and Public Affairs, Anchor) and
  • Baroness Kay Andrews (Member of the House of Lords Built Environment Committee, Former Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) 2006-2009)

The conference was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, ILC-UK) and Lawrence Churchill (Trustee, ILC-UK). The full conference brochure, including biographies for each of speakers, is available to view here - ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference Brochure

This was a paid-for conference with an early bird rate available until a few month before the conference.
 

See below for the presentations slides from the day.


See below for an agenda from the day.

ILC-UK Future of Ageing Conference 2015 - AGENDA


 


We were grateful to Eli Lilly, McCarthy & Stone, Partnership and Partnership for Change for their sponsorship of this conference, and to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), Lipreading Practice, and the organisers of the IFA 2016 Conference for providing inserts for delegate packs on the day

 

   

   
 

    

 

 

Health,Quality of Life

Monday 2nd November 2015; 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) – 16:30; The Annie Altschul/ Agnes Hunt Rooms, 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

ILC-UK held a panel discussion to launch the Drink Wise, Age Well programme.

The event brought together important stakeholders to discuss the growing problem of alcohol misuse in the over 50s population of the UK. Supported  by the Big Lottery Fund, Drink Wise, Age Well brings together 6 strategic partners; Addaction, the Royal Voluntary Service, International Longevity Centre UK, Drugs and Alcohol Charities Wales, Addiction Northern Ireland and the University of Bedfordshire.

With at least 20% of over 50s in the UK exceeding recommended alcohol units, and alcohol related harms significantly increasing in this age group, Drink Wise, Age Well will aim to create a healthier relationship with alcohol for the overs 50s population  through a preventative approach.

As part of our programme evaluation we have recently carried out a survey of drinking behaviour in people aged 50 and over which more than 17,000 people completed.

Joining our panel to discuss this important and growing issue were:

  • Simon Antrobus, CEO, Addaction (Chair)
  • Dr Sarah Wadd, Director, Substance misuse and Ageing Research Team at the Tilda Goldberg Centre, University of Bedfordshire
  • Dr Kieran Moriarty, Consultant Physician and Gastroenterologist, Bolton NHS FT
  • Don Lavoie, Alcohol Programme Manager, Alcohol Team, Public Health England
  • Professor José Iparraguirre, Chief Economist, Age UK


The presentation slides from the event are availabe to view below.

Health

Wednesday 16th September 2015, 19:00 (for a 19:30 start), London

This private, invitation-only, dinner is to launch the first report of the Sustainable Older Society 2020 project from the International Longevity Centre - UK, with support from EY. The report, Adding Life to Years not Years to Life: Creating a Sustainable 21st Century Healthcare System, has sourced a bank of robust innovative global case studies, identified significant trends in the global health environment and assessed key influencing factors in the success and replicability of these health innovations. We believe the health and social care innovations identified all have the ability to drive improved patient and delivery outcomes with significant cost savings.

This dinner will be the UK launch of the report and will discuss how the UK, faced with the twin challenges of limited resources and an ageing population, can ensure current health provision is sustainable. This report has identified a number of trends which pose challenges including the rise of NCDs, the reactive nature of current healthcare policy and the changing nature of health spending; there are however trends which give reason for optimism including advances in healthcare technology, advances in the use of big data and integrated care.

This report has been endorsed and steered by an advisory group of high level health and social care professionals including representatives from Public Health England, a former special advisor on health and social care, Walgreens Boots Alliance, AIG and EY. For change to happen we need the right people around the same table; to discuss what the barriers are to achieving a health system which properly values prevention, innovation and integration and, most importantly, to discuss how to overcome these barriers.

Alongside the report, SOS 2020 will be releasing a ‘Manifesto for Action’. One of the primary purposes of the dinner will be to discuss how we can advance these pledges and ensure prevention and public is health is further embedded in healthcare delivery. The pledge includes calls for the adoption of personal budgets and personalised care plans, for premature mortality from NCDs to be reduced by 25% by 2025 and for NHS England to explore the cost effectiveness of expanding the diabetes prevention programme to cover the highest cost NCDs such as dementia and cardiovascular disease.

For more infomation about SOS 2020, please contact us at events@ilcuk.org.uk.

Health

Tuesday 15th September 2015; 15:30-17:00; House of Lords, Westminster, London, SW1A 0PW

ILC-UK held a launch event for a new piece of research, Rethining Cancer. The Big ‘C’: Quantifying the social and economic impact of cancer. This report, kindly supported by Bristol-Myers Squibb*, investigates the wider social and economic impact of cancer in the UK.

We heard brief presentations from the one of the authors of the report, Brian Beach (ILC-UK Research Fellow), Emlyn Samuel (Senior Policy Manager, Cancer Research UK) and Debbie Abrahms MP (MP for Oldham East and Saddleworth; Member of the Work and Pensions Committee).

Cancer is the cause of one in four deaths in the UK, ending the lives of over 160,000 people every year and causing huge damage to families and communities. Survival rates have improved significantly in recent decades. Advances in cancer diagnosis, treatment and care will enable further progress to be made. However, population ageing is likely to result in rising cancer incidence, with the annual number of diagnoses expected to rise from around 330,000 per year today to 430,000 per year by 2030.

This report highlights the benefits of increasing survival rates and illustrating the value of improving support for survivors. It also evaluates the impact of cancer deaths on our economy, through lost employment, and the damage done to communities, through the loss of volunteers and informal caregivers.

*Bristol-Myers Squibb provided financial sponsorship to cover the costs of producing the report and the event launch. The company had no input to the report and ILC retained full editorial control.

Future of Age,Health,Transport

Thursday 18th June 2015; 15:00 (for a 15:15 start) - 17:00; Westminster, London

The International Longevity Centre-UK, supported by Age UK hosted an event for the launch of new research,The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society.

Demographic change will require a rethinking of current transport strategies. New approaches are needed to ensure that our growing population of older people are able to remain active and mobile during later life. To this end ILC-UK is working with Age-UK to try to set the agenda for the future age-friendly transport policy. 

Through The Future of Transport in an Ageing Society project we have developed innovative solutions to the many transport challenges faced by older people. Combining quantitative research using the English Longitudinal Survey of Ageing with the contributions from an expert workshop held in April the report highlights the changes needed during this new Parliament.

A full agenda for this event will be available closer to the event date.

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Health,Quality of Life,Work and Retirement

Thursday 30th April 2015; Bloomsbury, London; 17:45 (for an 18:00 start) – 19:45, followed by a drinks reception.

BBC Question Time, with David Cameron, Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg, presented by David Dimbleby was shown during the drinks reception following the event.

With a week to go until the General Election took place, ILC-UK and Independent Age organised a debate on Thursday 30th April. Away from the heat and fury of the election campaign, we hoped to create a chance to have a real debate to identify the most important priorities for all political parties, if the UK is truly going to rise to the challenge of a rapidly ageing population, in the next Parliament.

Following the 2014 launch of 2030 Vision: The Best and Worst Futures for Older People in the UK, Independent Age invited more than 30 opinion formers and leading charities and think tanks to blog their views on what we need to do to get ready for demographic change. The blogs kick-started a consultation which saw over 300 people respond, sharing their own hopes and fears of growing older in the UK. The results of this consultation were published in Independent Age’s November 2014 document, ‘2030 Vision: What we have learnt’ – http://www.independentage.org/media/894910/2030visioninterim.pdf.

Six big themes emerged:

  • Ageist attitudes still exist and many people worry they will face discrimination or becoming hidden members of society
  • Older people worry about the cost of living and many fear they are being financially squeezed
  • Older people are increasingly concerned about the future quality and sustainability of health and social care services
  • Older people worry about feeling lonely, but they also have concerns about feeling cut off as digital services increasingly replace face-to-face service provision
  • Older people want to continue making a positive contribution to their neighbourhoods and communities
  • Older people have a keen sense of what’s fair and how their contributions should be rewarded in retirement, but they also worry about how their children and grandchildren will fare

During this debate we considered older people’s main concerns as identified in the consultation and identified the priority areas that any incoming government should focus on. We hope to include these in an open letter which would be sent to the leaders of the three main political parties after the election, outlining how organisations working on older people’s issues believe we can build a better future for older people in the UK.

Speakers and panellists included: Briony Gunstone (YouGov), Caroline Abrahams (Age UK), Claire Turner (JRF) and Paul Cann (Campaign Management Group Partner at Campaign to End Loneliness; CEO, Age UK [Oxfordshire]). The event was chaired by Baroness Sally Greengross (ILC-UK) and Janet Morrison (Independent Age)

Following the debate, delegates were invited to join us for wine and canapés.

This was a private event.

Briony Gunstone's presentation slides from the event are available to view below:

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Health,International,Pensions

Wednesday 5th November 2014; European and Economic and Social Committee, TRE 7701, 7th floor, Trèves Building, 74 rue de Trèves, 1040 Brussels; 14:00 (for 14:30 start) – 17:00

This event was kindly hosted by the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC).

Throughout 2014, ILC-UK, supported by specialist insurer, Partnership Assurance Group plc (Partnership), has been undertaking a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

This event, as part of the Population Patterns Seminar Series, explored Europe’s ageing demography. Europe is currently facing unprecedented changes - by 2050 it is predicted that more than a third of the European population will be over 60 years old as a result of rising life expectancies and low birth rates.

These changes pose major economic, budgetary and social challenges. In the EU, age related spending is projected to rise from an annual cost of 25% to 29% of GDP between 2010 and 2060. At the same time, there are set to be far fewer people of working age to support European ageing populations- by 2060 the dependency ratio is predicted to drop to under two working-age people for every person aged over 65.

At this event we aimed to inform further this critical debate by launching our first ‘European Factpack’ of demographic statistics. This Factpack provided statistics on a range of topics from life expectancy to housing supply, and pensions to the use of new technologies amongst today’s older generations. The ‘European Factpack’ builds on our UK Factpack initiative, by providing the public, private and third sectors with the most up-to-date information on Europe’s changing demography.

During the discussion we explored:

  • What are the ramifications of Europe’s changing demography, both for individual countries and Europe as a whole?
  • What policy changes will need to be enacted to ensure Europe’s economic sustainability?
  • How the public, private and third sectors react to findings of the ‘European Factpack’?
  • Which areas of the Factpack might be expanded to help policy-makers, journalists and opinion formers?
     

This event was chaired by Lawrence Churchill, ILC-UK Trustee. Confirmed speakers inlcuded: Fritz von Nordheim (European Commission), Jean Lambert (MEP), Maciej Kucharczyk (Age Platform Europe), Andrew Rear (Munich Re), Maureen O'Neill (European Economic and Social Committee) and Richard Willets (Partnership).

Slides from the event are available below:

The slides presented by Fritz Von Nordheim are available here.

 

Fritz Von Nordheim ILC-UK 5 Nov 2014

 

 

Communities and Housing,Equality and Human Rights,Health,Pensions,Work and Retirement

ILC-UK are currently planning our activities at the 2014 Political Party Conferences. We hope to run a series of events on topics as diverse as pensions, health, employment, care and communities as part of the main party conference fringe programme.

If you are interested in talking to us about sponsoring a fringe event, please do get in touch with David Sinclair or Jessica Watson (jessicawatson@ilcuk.org.uk / davidsinclair@ilcuk.org.uk / 0207 340 0440).

We are also planning our 2014-2015 events programme. We organise 30+ events a year, from small discussion events, through to larger conferences. Our events always “sell out”, and often, very quickly. If you are interested in talking to us about sponsoring an event, please get in touch with David Sinclair or Lyndsey Mitchell at ILC-UK (events@ilcuk.org.uk / 0207 340 0440).

The International Longevity Centre-UK is the leading think tank on longevity and demographic change. It is an independent, non-partisan think tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change.

Health

Dear Colleague,

The ILC-UK has launched a Commission seeking to address the significant and growing problem of hearing loss in the UK. Six million people in the UK experience hearing loss at a level where they would benefit from wearing a hearing aid and this is set to increase to 10 million by 2037.

This is an independent commission, with the ILC-UK providing the governance and secretariat while the Commissioners, drawn from a wide range of different sectors, will drive the agenda and findings. As part of this high level Commission, we are delighted to invite you to attend two evidence sessions at the House of Lords on the following themes:


Thursday 5th June, 14:00 – 16:00 House of Lords
1. How can we ensure that hearing loss is detected early? Many individuals live for years without either realising that they have hearing loss or because they do not seek support. We welcome submissions around the following questions:

  • How can we de-stigmatise hearing loss?
  • Whether and to what extent it is possible to improve the referral process?
  • Are there alternative models to support early detection?
  • How can technology improve early detection?


Tuesday 17th June, 15:30 – 17:30 House of Lords
2. How can we deliver better solutions to reduce the adverse impacts of hearing loss? Early detection is only one part of the jigsaw, we must also propose solutions to reduce the wide-ranging effects of hearing loss. We welcome submissions on the following questions:

  • How do we ensure wider take-up of hearing aids?
  • What forms of service delivery models are needed to meet the needs of a growing hearing impaired population?
  • How do we remove barriers to employment for the hearing impaired?
  • How do we improve health and social care for those suffering with hearing loss?
  • How do we raise public awareness about, and sensitivity to, hearing loss?


During the two sessions Commissioners will have the chance to discuss these issues with expert witnesses but there will also be the opportunity for questions from the audience. We hope that the Commission will play an important part in addressing the significant and growing problem of hearing loss in the UK and that you too can play a part. The briefing note below provides more details about the workings of the Commission and details about the Commissioners.

If you would like to attend please contact us on events@ilcuk.org.uk or 0207 340 0440. Please note that places are limited and you will need a special pass to proceed through House of Lords security on the day so do get in touch if you would like to come along, specifying which evidence session you would like attend. If you have any special requirements, please let us know.  

Kind regards
Sally Greengross
Chair of the Commission on Hearing Loss and Chief Executive of ILC-UK

The Commission on Hearing Loss: Background Briefing Note

Health

19th November 2013, 10:00 (10.30) - 12.30 (followed by a light lunch), Royal College of Nursing, 20 Cavendish Square, London, W1G 0RN

At this event hosted by the Royal College of Nursing, ILC-UK launched a new report on adult immunisation. We also presented findings of major new research on adult immunisation across Europe which was published by the SAATI coalition in November 2013. The debate considered the findings of the research and explored how policymakers should respond to the challenges highlighted in the new reports.

According to the WHO, immunisation prevents between 2-3 million deaths a year across all age groups.[1]

Immunisation should be considered as a life course issue. It is generally the oldest and youngest in society who are the worst affected by vaccine preventable diseases. Increasing the uptake of vaccination across the life-course will help prevent the spread of disease to more vulnerable groups.

In an ageing society, it is important that adult immunisation attracts increasing attention from policy makers and health professionals.

  • In the EU, between 40,000 and 220,000 deaths per year can be attributed to influenza infection, depending on the pathogenicity of the circulating viral strain[2]. The highest prevalence occurs among older adults, especially those with chronic medical conditions or immunological disorders, resulting in increased mortality[3].
  • New evidence from Scotland suggests that the majority of cases of invasive pneumococcal infection are in older age groups: 41.1% (127 cases) were aged 65 years and older and 40.5% (125 cases) were aged 35 to 64 years, with just 18.4% (57 cases) being aged 34 and under.”[4]
  • Shingles affects approximately 250,000 adults in the UK every year.[5]

The SAATI (Supporting Active Ageing Through Immunisation) coalition is a voluntary pan-European partnership of individuals who have an interest in improving the health of citizens as they grow older, and reducing the incidence of illness through effective immunisation. In November 2013 they will publish a major research report on adult immunisation across Europe.

Following the research publication in Brussels, ILC-UK will launch a new report on adult immunisation which has been funded through an unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer International Operations. The report will inform UK policy makers to build on the success of childhood immunisation programmes to create a robust programme for adult immunisation. This event provides an opportunity to present and debate the latest research from SAATI and ILC-UK and consider the policy implications.


Agenda
10:00 - 10:30
Registration
10:30 - 10:35
Welcome from Chair
10:35 - 12:25
Presentations from:
Helen Donovan (RCN)
Professor David Taylor (UCL)
Michael Corr (Immunisation Coordinator, Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust)
David Sinclair (ILC-UK)
Q&A/Discussion
12:25 - 12:30
Close from Chair
12:30 - 13:00
Light lunch available

[1]http://www.who.int/immunization/newsroom/events/immunization_week/2012/further_information/en/

[2]European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). The hard facts are often overlooked: Influenza remains a threat.http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/healthtopics/spotlight/spotlight_influenza/key_message_2/pages/full_key_message_2.aspx

[3]Influenza vaccines. Wkly Epidemiol. Rec.80,279–287 (2005). [Medline]

[4] HPS, weekly report 31 August 2011. Available at: http://www.documents.hps.scot.nhs.uk/ewr/pdf2011/1135.pdf

[5] See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8487987.stm

 

View David Sinclair's presentation below:

Care,Health,Quality of Life

Centre for Research on Ageing, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Southampton and the International Longevity Centre – UK

International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) and the University of Southampton held an afternoon tea reception in the House of Lords on Tuesday 30th April, to showcase ground-breaking interdisciplinary research in the field of social care using policy-modelling tools at the University of Southampton, which is informing policy and shaping practice.

The population of the UK is ageing. In 2012, over five million people were aged 75 and over, comprising 8% of the population; by 2031 this figure is projected to rise to 8.3m, constituting 1 in every 8 people. Older people are the major users of health and social care services and the demographic changes combined with public sector spending cuts mean that supporting older people to continue to live independently in the community is an increasingly critical issue.

Research at Southampton in the EPSRC Care Life Cycle is developing tools to assist policy makers in understanding the future demand and supply of health and social care services, facilitating them to meet the needs of an ageing population.

Two case studies were presented during the event: the first examining the demand for local authority social care services including the impact of changing living arrangements and family structures on informal support; and the second uses the example of macular degeneration treatment to examine the complex interaction between health and social care.

The papers from the event are available for download below:

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Dementia,Health

28th November 2012, The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:30 (for a 16:55 start) – 19:30

The Prime Minister’s challenge on dementia launched in 2012 stated “Dementia is one of the biggest challenges we face today – and it is one that we as a society simply cannot afford to ignore any longer. We have made some good progress over the last few years, but there’s still a long way to go. Our research knowledge on dementia lags behind other major diseases such as cancer or heart disease”.

The continued gains in longevity, with life expectancy at birth in 2010 reaching 78.2 years for men and 82.3 years for women are a particular challenge for conditions like dementia which increase rapidly with age. Dementia affects around 1 in 100 people aged 65-69 years of age but 1 in 6 of those aged 80 and over.

This event brough together speakers from academic, charity and policy sectors to address the current state of knowledge and the gaps in key areas for dementia service provision:

  • Early prevention
  • Challenges facing general practitioners and the NHS
  • Care homes and end-of-life care
  • Costs of dementia care

This was the first in a series of events being organised by the Actuarial Profession under the theme The Actuarial Profession Mortality Seminar Series: Exploring the future; defining the questions.

Agenda from the event:

16:30 – 16:55
Registration with tea/coffee

16:55 – 17:00
Welcome by co-chairs Tom Dening (The University of Nottingham) and Baroness Sally Greengross (Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre – UK)

17:00 – 17:05
Introduction, James Orr (The Actuarial Profession)

17:05 – 18:05
Presentations from:

  • Clive Ballard (Alzheimer’s Society)
  • Claire Goodman (Professor of Health Care Research)
  • Louise Robinson (RCGP National Champion for Ageing and Older People)

18:05 – 18:55
Panel discussion/debate with speakers and:

  • Martin Green (DH Independent Sector Dementia Champion)
  • Raphael Wittenberg (LSE)

18:55 – 19:00
Close by chair

19:00 – 19.30
Refreshments/wine

Members of the Actuarial Profession attending this event could claim 2 hours CPD.

View and listen to the event here.

Health,Intergenerational,Older Consumers,Work and Retirement

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London WC1V 7QJ, 16:00, 22 November 2011

A debate considering the health and employment of older workers.

Demographic change means that many organisations now employ greater numbers of older workers. Many of these older workers will carry on working for longer than employees in recent decades for a variety of reasons including rising state pension age, the scrapping of the default retirement age, financial necessity, or simply wanting to continue working.

By many measures, today’s older workers are healthier than in the past - some would even call them “younger” as they retain an active life for longer. However, many chronic health problems such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and musculoskeletal conditions are more likely to be experienced by older people. While some believe that older workers suffer more ill-health than their younger counterparts, others says older workers take less time off because they are more conscientious and do not call in sick after a night out.

Many of the health problems that older workers suffer can be prevented or managed, but doing so requires a comprehensive approach that involves many actors including the NHS, health professionals, employers and older workers themselves.

The questions that will be considered during the debate include:

  • Do older workers take more or less sick leave than their younger counterparts?
  • What kind of health problems commonly lead to older workers taking sick leave or exiting the workforce early?
  • What government policies exist to help support older workers who experience health problems?
  • What interventions or innovations can minimise or prevent ill health amongst older workers?

Agenda from the event:

16.00 – 16.30
Registration and refreshments

16:30 – 16.35
Welcome by Actuarial Profession co-chair and introduction from co-chair Baroness Sally Greengross, Chief Executive, International Longevity Centre - UK.

16.35 – 17.05
Keynote speech on trends in the health of older workers, Dame Carol Black, Department of Work and Pensions

17.05 – 17.15
Measures and policies designed to support the health of older workers, ILC-UK

17.15 – 17.25
Case study on intervention(s) to support the health of older workers

17.25 – 18.30
Questions and panel discussion with speakers

18.30
Close and drinks

 

 

Health

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 03 November 2010

Kindly supported by Sanofi Pasteur MSD

Data shows that the most common reason for forced early retirement is ill-health, and that people who retire early due to ill health tend to be those who can least afford to do so. Older workers can also find themselves forced to stop work temporarily due to ill health.

This has huge implications in an ageing society where people are working longer for a variety of reasons including the rising state pension age, poor financial provision, and the desire to continue in their chosen profession.

Increasingly, employers understand and value the contribution that older workers can make, and want to provide a working environment that supports them.
The role of preventative healthcare is rising to the top of the health policy agenda in the UK, but traditionally it has not been seen as important for older people.

However, there are many interventions that have the potential to help older people avoid or minimise illness and stay healthier for longer, thus allowing them to continue to work if they choose to do so. For example, lifestyle interventions in older people can prevent or prolong the onset of cardiovascular disease and vaccination can protect older people from vaccine preventable diseases such as influenza, pneumococcal disease and shingles.

This debate examined the role of preventative healthcare in keeping older people, in particular older workers, in good health including whether this is practical and cost effective and what it means for employers and the economy.

Some of the questions the debate addressed were:

  • In an ageing society, has preventative healthcare become an economic necessity?
  • How can the economic benefit of health prevention be assessed?
  • Is preventative healthcare cost-effective for older people?
  • At what age is preventative healthcare most effective?
  • What is the relationship between ill-health and work?
  • How can preventative healthcare contribute to employment and well-being among the over-50s?
  • How can the private sector play a role in health prevention?
  • Is prevention cheaper than cure?


Agenda from the event:

16.00-16.30
Registration and refreshments
16:30-16.35
Introduction by the Chair, Baroness Jill Pitkeathley, House of Lords
16.35-16.55
Professor Marc Suhrcke, University of East Anglia
16.55-17.15
Dr Richard Pitman, Oxford Outcomes
17.15-18.25
Expert panel response (Dr David Heymann, Health Protection Agency, Ms Maggie Rae, Wiltshire PCT, and Mr Russell Turner, Marks and Spencer) and discussion with audience
18.25-18.30
Close and drinks

Health

17 February 2010, Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh and 3 March 2010 the Actuarial Profession, London, 16:00, 03 March 2010

To accommodate an ageing population people will need to work for longer but to what extent is this happening in reality and to what extent do barriers to working longer include poor health?

Kindly supported by Prudential.

To accommodate an ageing population people will need to work for longer but to what extent is this happening in reality and to what extent do barriers to working longer include poor health? Related concerns include the future affordability of pensions and rising cost of health and social care but more generally the strategic issue of maintaining or preferably improving economic prosperity in coming decades.

Drawing on research commissioned by the Prime Ministers Strategy Unit in 2009 and undertaken by Professor Les Mayhew from Cass Business School (http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_122.pdf), this joint ILC-UK/ Actuarial Profession debate considered the economic impact of increased longevity and healthy life expectancy on the UK economy.

Using extensive data sources, among the illustrative examples it considered:

  • Whether increasing longevity is being matched by increases in healthy life expectancy;
  • the extent to which poor health is a barrier to working for longer;
  • the role prevention/health promotion could play in securing a healthier future and improved economic prospects;
  • whether planned increases in state pension age will deliver the expected large savings in public expenditure and if there are offsetting costs that need to be factored in;
  • supply-side barriers to progress including socio-economic inequality and the role of societal factors such as obesity and mental health; and
  • wider demographic considerations and consequences including population size and immigration.


A copy of the slides presented by Professor Mayhew can be downloaded here: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_121.pdf.

Responses to Professor Mayhew’s presentation came from:

  • Jemima Ayton, Life Actuarial Team, Retail Firms Division, Financial Services Authority (3 March);
  • Tom Boardman, Director of Retirement Strategy and Innovation, Prudential (17 February & 3 March, copy of his slides can be downloaded here http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_120.pdf);
  • Baroness Sally Greengross, International Longevity Centre-UK (3 March);
  • Emily Grundy, Professor of Demographic Gerontology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (3 March);
  • Robert Laslett, Private Pensions and Cross-cutting Analysis Director and Chief Economist for Pensions, Department for Work and Pensions (3 March);
  • Duncan Macniven, Registrar General for Scotland, General Register Office for Scotland (17 February);
  • David Manion, Age Concern and Help the Aged, Scotland (17 February);
  • Stewart Ritchie, Past President of the Faculty of Actuaries in Scotland (17 February); and
  • John Storey, Older People and Age Team, Equality Unit, Scottish Government (17 February).


A copy of the report from the event can be downloaded: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/record.jsp?type=publication&ID=53

Economics of Age,Health

17 February 2010, Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh and 3 March 2010 the Actuarial Profession, London, 16:00, 17 February 2010

To accommodate an ageing population people will need to work for longer but to what extent is this happening in reality and to what extent do barriers to working longer include poor health?

Kindly supported by Prudential.

To accommodate an ageing population people will need to work for longer but to what extent is this happening in reality and to what extent do barriers to working longer include poor health? Related concerns include the future affordability of pensions and rising cost of health and social care but more generally the strategic issue of maintaining or preferably improving economic prosperity in coming decades.

Drawing on research commissioned by the Prime Ministers Strategy Unit in 2009 and undertaken by Professor Les Mayhew from Cass Business School (http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_122.pdf), this joint ILC-UK/ Actuarial Profession debate considered the economic impact of increased longevity and healthy life expectancy on the UK economy.

Using extensive data sources, among the illustrative examples it considered:

  • Whether increasing longevity is being matched by increases in healthy life expectancy;
  • the extent to which poor health is a barrier to working for longer;
  • the role prevention/health promotion could play in securing a healthier future and improved economic prospects;
  • whether planned increases in state pension age will deliver the expected large savings in public expenditure and if there are offsetting costs that need to be factored in;
  • supply-side barriers to progress including socio-economic inequality and the role of societal factors such as obesity and mental health; and
  • wider demographic considerations and consequences including population size and immigration.

A copy of the slides presented by Professor Mayhew can be downloaded here: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_121.pdf.

Responses to Professor Mayhew’s presentation came from:

  • Jemima Ayton, Life Actuarial Team, Retail Firms Division, Financial Services Authority (3 March);
  • Tom Boardman, Director of Retirement Strategy and Innovation, Prudential (17 February & 3 March, copy of his slides can be downloaded here http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/files/pdf_pdf_120.pdf);
  • Baroness Sally Greengross, International Longevity Centre-UK (3 March);
  • Emily Grundy, Professor of Demographic Gerontology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (3 March);
  • Robert Laslett, Private Pensions and Cross-cutting Analysis Director and Chief Economist for Pensions, Department for Work and Pensions (3 March);
  • Duncan Macniven, Registrar General for Scotland, General Register Office for Scotland (17 February);
  • David Manion, Age Concern and Help the Aged, Scotland (17 February);
  • Stewart Ritchie, Past President of the Faculty of Actuaries in Scotland (17 February); and
  • John Storey, Older People and Age Team, Equality Unit, Scottish Government (17 February).

A copy of the report from the event can be downloaded: http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/record.jsp?type=publication&ID=53

Health,Work and Retirement

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, WC1V 7QJ, 16:30, 28 November 2007

The increasing proportion of very old people in the population means that how to 'age well', even in later old age, is now an important issue for policymakers and researchers, as well as for older people themselves.

This debate began with a presentation from Dr Sarah Smith of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and will consider what it means to ‘age well’ and whether the extent of social interaction is associated with later health and well-being among the oldest old.

Panel and audience discussions explored the following questions:

  • What role should social activities have in preventive health among older people?
  • How can social activities be facilitated among the oldest cohorts?
  • What is the right balance between the statutory sector, voluntary sector and the individual in enabling social interaction among those in late old age?


The panel comprised:

  • Dr Leila Lessof OBE, former Director of Public Health, Kensington Chelsea & Westminster Health Authority
  • Simon Goodenough, Director of 'Upstream' Healthy Living Centre
  • Ann Bowling, Professor of Health Services Research, UCL
  • Dr Donna Lamping, Department of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine


You can download a copy of the ILC-UK policy brief here.

Health,Work and Retirement

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, 16:00, 05 December 2006

Age and Work in Health and Care: lessons from a European project

This seminar featured a presentation by Professor Phil Taylor of the Faculty of Business and Enterprise at Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne. The title of the seminar was “Age and Work in Health and Care: lessons from a European project”.

Professor Taylor is widely recognised as a leading international expert on ageing workforces, and was until recently Executive Director of Cambridge University’s Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Ageing.

Health,Longevity

The Atrium, 4 Millbank, Westminster, 28 July 2006

"The State of Ageing in Europe" Report - jointly authored by ILC-UK and The Merck Institute

We are delighted to have been working with the Merck Institute on Aging and Health to create the latest in the renowned 'State of Ageing' series. The report brings together into a single document the key indicators for the demographic, health, social and policy issues faced by the new EU-25.

Download a copy of the report here.

Communities and Housing,Health,Nutrition and Hydration

Stranger's Dining Room, House of Commons, Westminster, 16:00, 17 May 2006

The majority of malnutrition occurs in the community; older people are at particular risk and much of malnutrition is preventable.

The European Nutrition for Health Alliance, BAPEN - British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, and the International Longevity Centre–UK, in conjunction with the All Parliamentary Food and Health Forum, consulted a wide range of stakeholders to produce ‘Malnutrition among Older People in the Community: Policy Recommendations for Change’.

This report is intended as a Call to Action to UK policymakers across health, social and community care.

A reception, hosted by Lord Soley of Hammersmith on behalf of the European Nutrition for Health Alliance, was held at this launch of the final report.

Health

The Actuarial Profession, Staple Inn Hall, High Holborn, London, 16:00, 20 December 2005

The Personalised is Political: Pharmacogenetics and medical futures.

This ILC-UK and Actuarial Profession joint seminar featured a presentation from Dr Adam Hedgecoe, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Sussex. His published work includes 'The Politics of Personalised Medicine: Pharmacogenetics in the Clinic'.

Pharmacogenetics, the use of genetic testing to help develop and prescribe drugs, is trumpeted as heralding a revolution in healthcare, yet the speculative nature of many of the claims made for this technology mean that policymakers are operating in something of a 'vacuum' when it comes to thinking about regulation.

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