EVENTS:

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Global Ageing,Health,International

Thursday 21st April 2016, 12:30 – 14:30, Belgium

ILC-UK held a private lunch debate, supported by Prudential plc, for senior decision makers and policy experts to discuss how Europe can best respond to the economic and social challenges and opportunities emerging as a result of demographic change.

To introduce the debate, Richard Jackson, President of the Global Aging Institute and one of the world’s foremost authorities on ageing, explored the emerging demographic, economic, and social trends shaping the future of retirement. He discussed his most recent research findings on East Asia and the similarities and differences between the outlook there and in Europe.

ILC-UK then presented its own economic analysis of the impact of global demographic change on Europe and highlighted some of the policy implications for Member States.

During the lunch attendees debated:

  • Might Europe’s Growth Strategy be undermined by demographic change?
  • What can Europe learn from how other parts of the world are maximising the economic potential of an ageing society?
  • Is Europe’s Silver Economy well placed to benefit from the world-wide ageing trend?
  • How can initiatives (e.g. Covenant on Demographic Change) focused on helping cities and regions work best?
  • How can the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing help deliver a healthier older age?
  • What more can European policymakers do to help extend working lives and support active and productive ageing?
  • How can businesses help Europe to maximise the economic potential of an ageing society?

Please see below for a summary of the points raised at this roundtable discussion

Economics of Age,Future of Age,Global Ageing,International

Wednesday 20th April 2016,12:30 (for 13:00 start) – 14:30, London

ILC-UK held a private lunch debate, supported by Prudential plc, for senior decision makers and policy experts to discuss how the UK can best respond to the economic and social challenges and opportunities emerging as a result of demographic change.

To introduce the debate, Richard Jackson, President of the Global Aging Institute and one of the world’s foremost authorities on ageing, explored the emerging demographic, economic, and social trends shaping the future of retirement. He discussed his most recent research findings on East Asia and the similarities and differences between the outlook there and in Europe.

ILC-UK then presented its own economic analysis of the impact of global demographic change on the UK and highlighted some of the policy implications.

During the lunch attendees debated:

  • Might the UK’s plans for growth be undermined by demographic change?
  • What can the UK learn from how other parts of the world are maximising the economic potential of an ageing society?
  • Is the UK well placed to benefit from global ageing?
  • Is public policy in the UK adequately responding to demographic change?
  • What should the UK include within its forthcoming “fuller working lives” strategy?
  • How can business help the UK to maximise the economic potential of an ageing society?

Please see below for a summary of the points raised at this roundtable discussion

Communities and Housing,Future of Age,Health,International,Pensions

Wednesday 5th November 2014; European and Economic and Social Committee, TRE 7701, 7th floor, Trèves Building, 74 rue de Trèves, 1040 Brussels; 14:00 (for 14:30 start) – 17:00

This event was kindly hosted by the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC).

Throughout 2014, ILC-UK, supported by specialist insurer, Partnership Assurance Group plc (Partnership), has been undertaking a series of events to explore the relationship between our changing demography and public policy.

This event, as part of the Population Patterns Seminar Series, explored Europe’s ageing demography. Europe is currently facing unprecedented changes - by 2050 it is predicted that more than a third of the European population will be over 60 years old as a result of rising life expectancies and low birth rates.

These changes pose major economic, budgetary and social challenges. In the EU, age related spending is projected to rise from an annual cost of 25% to 29% of GDP between 2010 and 2060. At the same time, there are set to be far fewer people of working age to support European ageing populations- by 2060 the dependency ratio is predicted to drop to under two working-age people for every person aged over 65.

At this event we aimed to inform further this critical debate by launching our first ‘European Factpack’ of demographic statistics. This Factpack provided statistics on a range of topics from life expectancy to housing supply, and pensions to the use of new technologies amongst today’s older generations. The ‘European Factpack’ builds on our UK Factpack initiative, by providing the public, private and third sectors with the most up-to-date information on Europe’s changing demography.

During the discussion we explored:

  • What are the ramifications of Europe’s changing demography, both for individual countries and Europe as a whole?
  • What policy changes will need to be enacted to ensure Europe’s economic sustainability?
  • How the public, private and third sectors react to findings of the ‘European Factpack’?
  • Which areas of the Factpack might be expanded to help policy-makers, journalists and opinion formers?
     

This event was chaired by Lawrence Churchill, ILC-UK Trustee. Confirmed speakers inlcuded: Fritz von Nordheim (European Commission), Jean Lambert (MEP), Maciej Kucharczyk (Age Platform Europe), Andrew Rear (Munich Re), Maureen O'Neill (European Economic and Social Committee) and Richard Willets (Partnership).

Slides from the event are available below:

The slides presented by Fritz Von Nordheim are available here.

 

Fritz Von Nordheim ILC-UK 5 Nov 2014

 

 

International

Wednesday 29th October 2014; 14:00 (for a 14:30 start) – 16.00; Local Government House, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ

We were delighted to hold the ILC Global Alliance Robert Butler Memorial Lecture at the Local Government Association on the afternoon of 29 October 2014.

This event took place as part of the ILC Global Alliance visit to the UK.

Robert Butler, founder of ILC US, was a passionate believer in the importance of health and productive ageing and we were honoured that Dr Ros Altmann, government’s Business Champion for Older Workers agreed to give the Lecture this year.

The Lecture also provided an opportunity to meet and chat with the members of the ILC Global Alliance.

Baroness Sally Greengross

Dr Altmann's presentation slides can be viewed below:

International

Wednesday 29th October 2014; 08.30 (for a 09.00 start) – 12.00; Local Government House, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ

This event was a half day symposium which showcased international research by ILC Global Alliance members on frailty and mobility in old age.

This event took place as part of the ILC Global Alliance visit to the UK.

Speakers at the event included:

Rosy Pereyra – ILC-Dominican Republic: Sarcopenia: A forgotten cause of mobility problems in old age
Susana Concordo Harding – ILC-Singapore: Are we living longer and healthier? Exploring gender differences in health expectancy among older Singaporeans 
Sebastiana Kalula – ILC-South Africa: Prevalence and risks factors for falls, and the impact on mobility in later life: The Cape Town study
Didier Halimi – ILC-France: MOBILAGE: how to maintain frail people mobility? An ongoing experiment at Broca Hospital in Paris.
Kunio Mizuta – ILC-Japan: Long-term care prevention in Japan: To maintain older people’s mobility
Lia Daichman – ILC-Argentina: Loss of mobility, loss of Autonomy, loss of quality of life
Iva Holmerová – ILC-Czech Republic: Local and national initiatives to support active ageing and improve quality of long-term care in the Czech Republic.

Panel members at the event included: Marieke van der Waal – ILC-Netherlands; Jayant Umranikar – ILC-India

The presentation slides from the event are available to view below.

International

In celebration of International Women’s Day,  ILC-UK held an afternoon tea in the House of Lords on the subject of older women, on Thursday the 7th March 2013.

The event saw the launch of our Compendium of Essays penned by politicians, academics, journalists and representatives from the private and voluntary sector entitled:  Ageing and Women – Has the sisterhood forgotten older women?

While it is widely acknowledged the world is ageing, the intersection of age with gender has been historically ignored. Invariably women and men, as they age, share many of the same fundamental needs, yet, as is acknowledged in many parts of the world, older women are not only subject to specific challenges, but also critically, as noted above make significant contributions to their family, communities and wider society that are often overlooked.

Therefore, on the eve on Interntational Women's Day, and with female only speakers,  this event was an opportunity to discuss how we can progress the needs and rights of older women at both the UK and International level.

This event was kindly supported by Pfizer.

Communities and Housing,International

March 28/29 2011, Church House, Westminster, London, 28 March 2011

Economic and Social Research Council/Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science/International Longevity Centre

The aim of the Symposium was to examine the impact of demographic change on major cities in Japan and the UK, many of whom will have populations of 30 per cent or more aged 60 and over by 2020. The ageing of urban populations will present a major challenge for areas such as: transportation; technology; design and planning; housing; and the organisation of health and social care. The Symposium will bring together researchers and policy makers from both countries involved in developing new approaches to improving the quality of life of older people living in urban environments. The Symposium drew upon case studies from the World Health Organisation's 'Age Friendly Cities' programme which has active involvement from cities in Japan and the UK:

The Symposium was organised around four main themes:

  • State of the art reviews of research in Japan and the UK on urbanisation and ageing populations
  • Case studies of initiatives designed to improve the 'age friendliness' of urban environments
  • Assessment of the main policy challenges around urbanisation and ageing.
  • Potential research collaborations between Japan and the UK on ageing and the urban environment (workshops).

Location: Church House Conference Centre, London

http://www.churchhouseconf.co.uk/corporate_events/rooms/bishop_partridge_hall

If you are interested in further information about this event please contact info@vistaevents.co.uk